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Bobby Portis’ Time to Shine

Bobby Portis talks to Basketball Insiders about his increased role on offense, the Bulls’ young core of talent and more.

David Yapkowitz

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When the Chicago Bulls acquired Dwyane Wade and Rajon Rondo in the summer of 2016, it was assumed that they were gearing up for another strong season and a playoff appearance. Fred Hoiberg had just finished up his first season as head coach and the team ended with a decent 42-40 record, albeit missing the playoffs.

They struggled the following season, however,but snuck into the postseason as the eighth seed in the Eastern Conference with a 41-41 record. They put a brief scare into the Boston Celtics in the first round, but Bulls management ultimately decided to move in another direction. They traded franchise cornerstone Jimmy Butler, bought out Wade’s contract and allowed Rondo to sign elsewhere.

The departure of their veteran players opened up minutes and opportunities for the younger guys on the team, in particular, Bobby Portis. Currently, in his third year with the Bulls, Portis was surrounded by veteran guys during his first couple of years in the league. It’s a different type of environment now in Chicago.

“We went from a veteran-led team, very experienced team, to now having guys on the team here who have never played in the playoffs,” Portis told Basketball Insiders. “It’s a different team, but at the same time we’re gonna grow together and get better together.”

A McDonald’s All-American coming out of Hall High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, Portis was one of the best college basketball players in the nation during the 2014-15 season. He was named the SEC Player of the Year and he declared for the NBA Draft after his sophomore season at the University of Arkansas.

He was selected with the 22nd overall pick in the 2015 draft but having joined a team that had serious playoff aspirations, he saw only sporadic playing time as a rookie. His second year in the NBA, he started seeing increased playing time, but he still had a string of DNP’s throughout the year. His role changed this season when the Bulls front office started heading down the rebuilding path.

“I’m just playing more minutes and actually having a defined role on the team. I don’t have to come in worried if I’m gonna play or not, I know I’m gonna play,” Portis told Basketball Insiders. “That’s the biggest thing for me. Also, the coaching staff having the utmost confidence in me to go out there every night and do what I do.”

This season, he’s emerged as one of the young Bulls most dependable reserves. He’s averaging a career-best 21.3 minutes per game while putting up 13 points on a career-high 10.7 field goal attempts and shooting 47.5 percent from the field. He’s also improved his outside shooting, connecting on 34.7 percent of his attempts from the three-point line.

With many of the Bulls top scoring options gone, Portis has had to take on a much bigger role in the Bulls’ offense. On Thursday night against the Philadelphia 76ers, he dropped a career-high 38 points on 57.7 percent shooting and 6-9 shooting from beyond the arc. In the Bulls’ 22 games since Jan. 1, he’s only failed to reach double-figures in scoring in seven of those games.

“I always say my role is to bring energy and toughness off the bench. Now I feel like my role has changed a little bit,” Portis told Basketball Insiders. “I have to be more aggressive on the offensive end, even more so than last year. Going out there and trying to make my teammates better, moving the basketball, sharing the basketball, trying to lead by example.”

Although he’s been playing better personally, he’s also seen a change in the team as a whole as the season has progressed. The Bulls dug themselves into a hole to begin the season, losing 17 of their first 20 games. They had a much better stretch during their next 20 games, winning 11 of them, including seven consecutively.

“We’re learning how to close games out, learning how to finish games. That’s something we didn’t do earlier in the season, we let other teams come back and win,” Portis told Basketball Insiders. “We’re learning some of each other’s tendencies with the basketball. Having chemistry on the court is always big.”

And as the Bulls move forward with their rebuilding project, they seem to have found at least one player in Portis who can be a part of that. He still has another year left on his contract before he can become a restricted free agent in the summer of 2019. He likes what he sees from the Bulls’ young core, and it’s something he’d like the continue to be a part of.

“Guys are going out there and getting minutes,” Portis told Basketball Insiders. “That’s the biggest thing in this league, you play more minutes you get more experience. It’s having an opportunity.”

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NBA Daily: Trade Watch: Atlantic Division

The season is still young but there are already trade possibilities brewing. Ben Nadeau takes a look at the Atlantic Division.

Ben Nadeau

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With each team in this division spiraling off in their own unique direction, the upcoming trade season should offer plenty of intrigue and mystery. For a contender like the league-leading Toronto Raptors, there likely won’t be much movement, certainly not in the case of moving somebody heavily entrenched in their presently-dominating rotation. But for the other four — two of them legitimate contenders as well — some interesting narratives have presented themselves already after a single month.

So whether these five franchises are looking to tank out, move an expiring contract or prepare for a deep postseason run, these are the players in the Atlantic Division worth keeping an eye on as the season unfolds.

Boston Celtics — Terry Rozier

Of course, Terry Rozier would end up here.

When Bill Simmons’ report about Rozier’s potential frustration went out to the masses about a week ago, it whipped up NBA Twitter into an immediate frenzy. For what it’s worth, general manager Danny Ainge quickly shot down those rumors on the radio, citing that Rozier would’ve come to him or head coach Brad Stevens with any playing time-related matters. Still, the overarching issue here remains that Rozier will be a restricted free agent this summer and there’s no clear road to the major minutes a young player like him deserves.

The Celtics committed a healthy sum to Marcus Smart last offseason following a semi-long standoff, while Kyrie Irving all but stated his intentions to stick around for the foreseeable future. Toss in Jaylen Brown, Gordon Hayward and Jayson Tatum as the other frequent ball-handling cornerstones, and there may just be too many mouths to feed. The Celtics have Finals-or-bust expectations, however, so they’re not going to move Rozier without getting substantial pieces in return. Throughout this brilliantly navigated, rapid-moving rebuild, Ainge has always had things fall into place perfectly — right place, right time — but this Rozier situation is far from being resolved.

Brooklyn Nets — Kenneth Faried

When Kenneth Faried and his expiring contract ended up with the Nets this July, it looked like a win-win situation for everybody involved. Brooklyn — a team that frequently offered up offensive rebounds for the opposition at the worst possible times last season — had acquired a low-risk, high-energy athlete who was once renowned for his work on the boards. And yet, Faried has been out of head coach Kenny Atkinson’s rotation from the very get-go, sharply behind Jared Dudley, Ed Davis, Jarrett Allen and second-round rookie Rodions Kurucs.

The final year of Faried’s 2014 extension is worth around $13.7 million, so any interested team would have to send back another big contract to grab the infrequently-used forward. The Nets are very much looking toward their gobs and gobs of free cap space this summer, so they’d have to be persuaded to make such a move. On the other hand, general manager Sean Marks has never shied away from a deal and even managed to move Tyler Zeller for a second-round pick last year — so Faried’s situation is an unusual one. As the 10th-worst rebounding team in the NBA currently, it’s surprising that Faried, who sports a career average of 8.2 boards per game, can’t find meaningful minutes. If Faried stays in Brooklyn and simply expires, that’s a win for the Nets, but if Marks can spin him into a future asset without taking back any big commitments — that’s also something to keep an eye on.

Brooklyn Nets — DeMarre Carroll

Given that the Nets’ once bright-seeming season is on the fritz following the brutal injury to Caris LeVert, a name to keep an eye on here is DeMarre Carroll — Brooklyn’s junkyard, do-it-all veteran. Carroll was incredible last season, rejuvenating his career — and shedding the tag of a salary dump once and for all — to the tune of 13.5 points, 6.6 rebounds and two assists per game on 41.4 percent shooting from the floor. At 6-foot-8, Carroll can guard multiple positions and contribute as a stretch four as well. Should the Nets decide that the waters are too choppy without their breakout star, Carroll becomes an absolute prime candidate to trade.

Similarly to Faried, the Nets will gladly let Carroll’s contract worth $15.4 million expire this summer and continue to stack that free agent piggy bank — but, inversely, Brooklyn could receive something valuable in return for the 32-year-old. Matching salaries in a cash-strapped league is always difficult, but postseason contenders will always need hard-nosed defense, gritty hustle and consistent three-point shooting. As of now, Carroll brings all three to the table for a Nets team that may not need it depending on the franchise’s chosen path.

New York Knicks — Courtney Lee

Unfortunately, Courtney Lee hasn’t featured for the Knicks yet in 2018-19 as recurring neck spasms have kept the 11-year professional out since training camp. Still, even if Lee was well enough to play, it’s tough to see where he fits in longterm with this young, rebuilding Knicks squad. If Lee can return to health, New York would certainly prefer to move his cap hit, worth about $25 million over the next two years, to a contender that needs a shooter. As the Knicks gear up to chase marquee free agents this upcoming summer — ahem, Kevin Durant — they’d really benefit from clearing out Lee by the trade deadline.

Lee, 33, averaged 12 points, 2.9 rebounds and 2.4 assists on 40.6 percent from three-point range last season for New York and the shooting guard has been a model of reliability over his solid career. At this point, Lee would be competing with Tim Hardaway Jr., Frank Ntilikina, Emmanuel Mudiay and undrafted sensation Allonzo Trier for minutes, but the Knicks are committed to developing their growing bunch of future pieces and they don’t seem opposed to losing as many games as possible. Given in the added bonus of joining the Durant Lottery this offseason — which became far more interesting this week — and Lee’s eventual movement seems set in stone.

Philadelphia 76ers — Furkan Korkmaz

And then there’s Furkan Korkmaz, who may or may not desire to still be traded following the Sixers’ acquisition of Jimmy Butler. Through the first few weeks of the campaign, Korkmaz was averaging well-south of seven minutes per game, even racking up seven DNPs for good measure. Now into his second stateside season — and with Philadelphia declining his team option at the end of October — Korkmaz has been searching for answers. Korkmaz’s contract situation is not dissimilar to that of his former teammate, Jahlil Okafor, who had his team option declined and then got traded to Brooklyn during the 2017-18 season. Thanks to Philadelphia’s decision, any team that adds Korkmaz this year can only offer a new contract at his declined rate of about $2 million, thus putting any potential suitors in a tough place to keep him.

But the departure of Dario Saric and Robert Covington has invariably opened up some playing time for the Turkish sharpshooter. Since the deal on Nov. 10, Korkmaz has played 15 or more minutes in three of his four contests, even posting 16 points and four rebounds in a mid-week 10-point win over Miami. There’s been no public recanting of his trade request, but if the minutes stay steady, that whole thing could be water under the bridge soon enough. The 76ers’ bench is a weak spot in particular, so both Kyle Korver and the aforementioned Lee make plenty of sense as potential options. But while Philadelphia will surely look to add some pieces, their outgoing trade bait is running thin at the moment.

If Korkmaz’s moment in the sun is ultimately fleeting — it shouldn’t be — and the Sixers feel the need to upgrade, then the second-year player may finally get his wish.

With a little less than three months until the trade deadline, the trade market will only get spicier from here on out. Between the rotation crunch, salary dumps and expiring contracts, the Atlantic Division has a slew of players that could be on the move before all is said and done. While everybody is chasing the Raptors as of now, the Celtics and 76ers are in prime position to improve their respective rosters as well. The New York-based teams will have their gaze set firmly on those humid summer months once more, but can they bolster their future plans between now and February?

Only time can tell, but this is shaping up to be another excellent race to the trade deadline for every team in the Atlantic Division.

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NBA Daily: Lamb’s Opportunity In Charlotte Is Here

Spencer Davies chats with Charlotte Hornets guard Jeremy Lamb and first-year head coach James Borrego about the 26-year-old’s starting role.

Spencer Davies

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A short few games into the Charlotte Hornets’ season, James Borrego pulled Jeremy Lamb aside to talk.

Why haven’t you been a starter in this league?

Together, the first-year head coach and former UConn standout discussed the topic at length, identifying specific areas and reasons as to why that was.

I believe you can be if you want to be.

The question Borrego posed was a fair one. Lamb is in his seventh year in the league. As the 12th overall selection in the 2012 NBA Draft, there were high hopes for the Huskies sophomore to transition seamlessly into the professional ranks.

It wasn’t quite as cut and dry as some may have thought it would be.

The Houston Rockets picked him in that draft, but it wasn’t long before they sent Lamb to the Oklahoma City Thunder in the infamous James Harden trade, mere days before the season began.

During his three-year stint with the Thunder, Lamb showed plenty of flashes of what he could become at this level. However, with the likes of Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook in front of him, among others, his chances to do so were sporadic.

“Everybody’s road is different,” Lamb told Basketball Insiders. “Me, when I first got in the league, I was playing behind All-Stars. I wasn’t in a position to play at that time. I wasn’t big enough to play.”

Knowing the situation he was in, Lamb made it a priority to soak up all the advice and information he could. Oklahoma City’s roster was loaded with “the greatest players in the game” when it came to veteran leadership.

Guys like Derek Fisher, Caron Butler, Kendrick Perkins and Nick Collison—along with Serge Ibaka and Thabo Sefolosha—guided Lamb every day he was there. The Thunder coaching staff kept him motivated to stay ready.

In the summer of 2015, Oklahoma City traded Lamb to the Hornets. He quickly signed a contract extension after the deal was made and has been with the franchise since.

When the move happened, Lamb knew his time was coming. All of those lessons he learned from the vets were going to pay off, and he took them with him in the next step of his career.

“All the stuff they told me, I lived by that and it stuck with me,” Lamb told Basketball Insiders. “Just trying to get better every year, just trying to never be satisfied, trying to work on my weaknesses, trying to keep working on the things I was good at. I don’t know, just trying to stay focused and be the best player that I can be.”

One month into year seven as a pro, Lamb has secured a role with the starting five in Charlotte. And while he has started games in the past, things are different this time.

He’s looked more confident when he’s been out on the court. He’s getting into the paint at a high rate. He’s shooting a career-high three-point percentage.

And the most encouraging part of his game that’s improved? The defensive focus.

“Being a starting two-guard in the league is not easy,” Borrego said. “You gotta guard every single night, can’t take a night off. So I give him a lot of credit. He’s grown up a lot this season. I’m proud of him and I think he’s growing every single game.”

When asked why it’s taken Lamb longer than others to adapt to the NBA, the answer wasn’t an easy one to give for Borrego. It could be as simple as opportunity or a different type of learning curve, but there is no singular reason.

“It takes time,” Borrego said. “It just takes time to grow and mature and learn the game and figure out who you are and where you fit in this league. Sometimes it takes one year, two years and obviously here he is, seven years in, and he has his opportunity now.

Asking Lamb the same thing directly, he believes it comes down to applying the knowledge he’s gained and taking it year by year. While acknowledging that some in his draft class may have grown up at a fast rate, the 26-year-old also pointed out the chunk of players who are no longer a part of the association.

“Am I just getting comfortable in the league? I’m not just getting comfortable, but with every year you get more comfortable, more experience,” Lamb told Basketball Insiders. More years, you know how the league is, you know how things go. So I’m not just now getting comfortable, but I get more and more comfortable every year for sure. It’s a blessing to be able to be in my seventh year.

“Nobody, including myself, thought that I would be in the league this long. And it’s just been a huge blessing and I’m trying to take advantage of it.”

Looking at Lamb’s success, it’s gone hand-in-hand with the new system Borrego has implemented. The Hornets are playing smart and defending well, and the players are buying in.

“Just trying to be aggressive, just trying to keep working,” Lamb told Basketball Insiders of his success. “Take what the defense gives me. I play off of Kemba [Walker]. They converge on him, I just try to knock down the shot.

“I think he really put [an] emphasis on threes and getting to the rim, and I feel like getting to the rim, good things happen. That’s one thing about his system. He really caters it to getting to the rim. So that’s why we’re getting more threes, we’re getting to the free throw line, we’re getting a lot of points in the paint, getting out in transition. It’s good.”

As per usual, Walker is on a tear, averaging over 26 points and getting up a team-high 10 threes per game for the first time in his career. He’s leading the Hornets on the floor and in the box scores. It’s almost as if the locker room should be endorsing the KeM-VP campaign.

“I think he is,” Lamb told Basketball Insiders. “He been playing at that level right now and the sky’s the limit for him. That’s funny you say KeM-VP. That’s hilarious. But all his hard work is paying off. He’s been playing great and it’s been fun to watch.”

As one of the brighter young minds in the NBA, Borrego, a longtime San Antonio Spurs assistant and one-time Orlando Magic interim head coach, has brought a palpable liveliness and enthusiasm to the Hornets this year.

“It’s definitely been different,” Lamb told Basketball Insiders. “It’s a new energy. Everything is different. I think we’ve adjusted well to the new system and [are] playing well.”

Borrego doesn’t necessarily think that there was a chemistry issue before he arrived. He and his staff only had one goal, and that was to make sure the guys on the roster played a selfless brand of basketball.

“When you have a healthy culture, when you have guys that believe in each other, like being around each other, they trust each other, they’re unselfish—I’ve seen what that does for a team,” Borrego said. “And it’s not always easy to change that.”

Attending Charlotte’s shoot-arounds in the past, at least from this writer’s perspective, you’d rarely hear the team as engaged as it was Tuesday morning in Cleveland.

Before media availability, curtains are closed and practices are private for the road team. But these guys were counting in unison as they battled each other in a team vs. team three-point contest.

It was the first to five or ten in each matchup. In the process, you could hear how much of a blast it was for everybody involved.

“These players are like, they’re kids,” Borrego said. “They get into it. They love it. They’re competitive. And that’s kind of the way to get them going in the morning. They don’t want to hear me talk about Cleveland or shoot-around or this or that.

“This group is really having fun this year. They’re excited. They like playing with each other. They like playing for one another. They like competing against each other in these games. So we believe we have a healthy locker room right now and a healthy group out there.”

A mixture of age groups on the roster could be a big reason why. Lamb thinks that the older guys who have been there and done that can help the youth develop. By the same token, those younger players provide the energy to practices and in the games, which can give the veterans a boost.

Lamb was approached with the term, “loose” to describe the mood of the team. He disagrees with that, but he senses the togetherness.

“We try to have fun,” Lamb told Basketball Insiders. “I didn’t know it’d be that much smiling at shoot-around because people be wanting to be in their bed. But no, we definitely try to make the most out of it. Every time we get, we try to get better.”

During Borrego’s time in San Antonio, he got to coach a man in a similar predicament. His name was Patty Mills, and, as we know, he’s turned into one of the most reliable players in this league for Gregg Popovich.

“He earned it,” Borrego said. “He grew over time and figured out his role in this league and he’s established himself.”

Now at the head of the ship in Charlotte, Borrego sees a similar path for Lamb.

“He’s not going anywhere,” Borrego said. “This is a guy that believes he belongs. He believes he can be a starter now, and I expect him to only grow from here.

“Once you get a taste of being a starter, you want to stay a starter, you want to keep that mentality—stay hungry, stay focused. So he has that ability to do that.”

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NBA Daily: Trade Watch Central Divison

Which players could be on the move in the Central? Shane Rhodes names a list of candidates.

Shane Rhodes

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It has been quite the up and down start to the season for the Central Division.

On one hand, the Milwaukee Bucks have stormed out of the gates, while the Indiana Pacers have, at times, looked like one of the best teams in the Eastern Conference. On the other, the Detroit Pistons, Chicago Bulls and Cleveland Cavaliers have combined to start a dismal 13-29.

It may be early in the season but, as the Philadelphia 76ers have shown with their recent acquisition of Jimmy Butler, it is never too early to think about trades that could improve the team. If these teams make themselves out to be wheelers and dealers, what could they add or subtract? Which players could be on the move?

Milwaukee Bucks – John Henson

The play of Brook Lopez has made John Henson, and the near $10 million he is due next season, expendable. Lopez has started every game this season for the Bucks to the tune of 12.5 points, 3.1 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.6 blocks per game. He has also played a major role in the three-point wave that washed over Milwaukee upon Mike Budenholzer’s arrival; Lopez has taken seven three-point attempts per game and is knocking them down at a 41.8 percent clip.

Henson, meanwhile, hasn’t done much off the bench.

With most of the big minutes split between Lopez and Ersan Ilyasova, Henson hasn’t seen the floor much. While he has played in all 14 games, he has averaged only 13.5 minutes per to go along with 5.6 points and 5.1 rebounds per game. He is shooting a career-high 35.5 percent on 2.2 three-point attempts per game (also a career high), but that alone isn’t enough to take minutes away from Lopez.

At this point, a trade would not only seem logical but beneficial for both parties as well. Henson could latch on with a team that would make use of his services. Meanwhile, the Bucks would clear some cap space and open up more minutes for third-year center Thon Maker.

Ideally, Milwaukee would acquire another shooter to provide Giannis Antetokounmpo with maximum spacing as well.

Indiana Pacers – Myles Turner

Myles Turner looked like he needed a change of scenery last season. Then, the Indiana Pacers gave him a four-year, $80 million extension over the offseason.

Not much has changed for Turner in 2018. While he has posted an impressive 2.4 blocks per game, Turner has averaged just 10.9 points and 4.8 rebounds in 26.7 minutes per game, down from the 12.7 points and 6.4 rebounds he posted a season ago.

More importantly, Turner has continued to play ahead of Domantas Sabonis.

In his second season with the Pacers, Sabonis has averaged 14.1 points, 8.8 rebounds and 2.5 assists in 24.1 minutes per game off the bench. While he isn’t the versatile defender Turner is, Sabonis has shown that he has much more to offer on the offensive end.

As was the case last season, Turner has the look of a player that could use a change of scenery. His departure would allow the Pacers to move Sabonis into the starting lineup, alleviate some spacing issues and clear the way for offseason-signee Kyle O’Quinn to see some minutes off the bench.

Detroit Pistons – Langston Galloway

In back-to-back years, the Detroit Pistons have used their top draft selection on a shooting guard: Bruce Brown in 2018 and Luke Kennard in 2017.

So, why is Langston Galloway still on the books?

Galloway would seem the odd man out in a crowded two-guard rotation in Detroit, one that includes Kennard, Brown and Reggie Bullock. Not only is he the most expensive of the bunch with a $7 million cap hit this season, but he hasn’t exactly made waves when on the court. While he has seen a major bump in playing time — 24.5 minutes per game compared to 14.9 last season — his contributions haven’t changed all that much; Galloway has averaged 9.6 points, 2.8 rebounds and 1.3 assists per game this season compared to 6.2 points, 1.6 rebounds and one assist per game last season.

It doesn’t make sense to take any time away from Bullock, the starter, or stunt the potential growth of Kennard and Brown. If Detroit can flip Galloway and clear the money on his contract, or find some competent forward depth behind Blake Griffin, Stanley Johnson and Glenn Robinson III, they should jump at the chance.

Chicago Bulls – Robin Lopez

This one is simple.

The Chicago Bulls are rebuilding and Robin Lopez is, at worst, a serviceable rotation player on a potential playoff team. Outside some mentor-like responsibilities, he only serves to take minutes away from the Bulls’ youth.

His playing time has dipped this season; Lopez has averaged 15.3 minutes per game after he saw 26.4 a season ago. With Lauri Markkanen expected back in the next few weeks, it would only seem destined to dip further. The best course of action for Chicago would be to move Lopez to a team desperate for an interior presence.

While there is light at the end of the tunnel in Chicago, they should keep in mind that they are still in the midst of a rebuild. The Bulls should acquire assets whenever they can to further things along wherever they can, and this seems like a prime opportunity.

Cleveland Cavaliers – Is Anyone Not On The Table?

The Land has fallen on hard times.

With the departure of LeBron James, so too has winning basketball departed from the Cleveland Cavaliers. The team has dealt with their share of injuries, but the Cavaliers looked bad at the start of the season when they were healthy. With Kevin Love out for the foreseeable future, no one should expect things to get much better.

There are a number of players that Cleveland could look to move: Love, J.R. Smith, George Hill, Kyle Korver. The list goes on. The only player one could think to be “off limits” would be rookie point guard Collin Sexton, and even he could probably be had for the right price.

Such is the life of the NBA bottom feeder.

The Cavaliers would be wise stockpile whatever future assets they can. Expect their phones to be some of the busiest in the country between now and the February trade deadline.

As teams continue to soldier on through the season, they will look to make deals. Whether they approach the table as buyers or sellers, every team will look to improve themselves either in the now or with an eye on the future.

Basketball Insiders has already looked at some of the potential trade candidates in the Northwest and Southwest divisions. Keep an eye out for our trade candidates in the Southeast, Atlantic and Pacific divisions as well.

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