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Four For Five: Untold Personal Observations From Covering The NBA

In this NBA Sunday, Moke Hamilton shares some of his favorite personal encounters from covering the NBA.

Moke Hamilton

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Tracy McGrady’s 13 points in 33 seconds, Kobe Bryant’s 81 points and even Giannis Antetokounmpo’s leapfrogging Tim Hardaway, Jr. in a professional basketball game—those moments are why I watch the game.

Aside form the obvious, other moments often end up being the reason why I cover it.

As fans of professional sports and those that cover the game, we spend so much of our time sitting through expected occurrences just in case something exceptional happens.

Kyrie’s three-pointer to sink the Warriors in the 2016 NBA Finals and Ray Allen’s three-point shot to give the Miami HEAT new life back in the 2013 NBA Finals are two examples, but the truth of the matter is that moments of grandeur occur fairly often. Obviously, though, the higher the stakes are the more those moments will resonate as time progresses.

What I’ve appreciated most over the past five seasons, however, have been the moments that occurred behind the scenes and away from the public eye. As journalists and those that follow the game, we have a front row seat to both the action that occurs on the basketball court, but also many of the things that happen off of it.

Here are a few that will stay with me forever.

Dwyane Wade and Kevin Durant’s Rendezvous

In 2012, with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh by his side, for the first time in his career, LeBron James knew what it felt like to hoist the Larry O’Brien trophy. Little did he or Kevin Durant know that it would be the first of a few times that they would be doing battle for the right to sit atop the NBA’s iron throne.

It’s been a long six years for James. Dating back to 2011, he’s made eight consecutive trips to the NBA Finals, emerging victorious in three of them. One could argue, however, that the past six years have been even longer for Durant.

Back in 2012, the basketball viewing public was still euphoric at the thought of James, the mercenary, still being winless.

In many ways, the 2012 NBA Finals featured the HEAT—a team that many felt were attempting to “buy” their way to a championship—against the team that had come to embody all that was right about professional sports. Along with Durant, Sam Presti and the Oklahoma City Thunder had an organic program that featured players that had been drafted by the franchise. From Russell Westbrook to James Harden, Serge Ibaka and the oft-used Reggie Jackson, the marketing tale of the 2012 NBA Finals was one of good versus evil.

Still, after the HEAT somewhat easily dispatched the Thunder in five games, the contrast between the upstart Thunder and the veteran-laden HEAT was stark. The HEAT turned American Airlines Arena into a South Beach nightclub, while Durant and Westbrook sat silently in their locker room after Game 5 had concluded. I stood over Durant’s shoulder for about 10 minutes. He said nothing, but found refuge in his iPhone. In all likelihood, it appeared that he was finding a way to cope with the loss and responding to the hundreds of text messages he’d received that were each attempting to reassure him.

None of those text messages, however, probably resonated with him as much as his chance encounter with Dwyane Wade.

The two had an impromptu rendezvous as Wade’s media availability ended. Standing in a white tee-shirt that smelled of Dom Perignon champagne, after going up and addressing the media, Wade spent about five minutes chatting with Durant while I stood about 10 feet away.

In the conversation, Wade told Durant to keep his head up and assured him that as long as the Thunder stayed together and remained dedicated to one another, that they too would be winning multiple championships.

For the most part, Durant simply nodded, even as Wade instructed him to never be afraid of failure. Wade held the Larry O’Brien trophy in his left hand and embraced Durant with his right.

The two eventually went their separate ways and, interestingly enough, would never see one another in the playoffs again.

Years later, in our last one-on-one conversation, Wade, then a member of the Bulls, discussed Durant and his defection to Golden State with me at length. Wade drew comparisons between his experience with James and what Durant would experience in Oakland and advised him to not try to play into the villain role.

Now a two-time champion, Durant can obviously do things his way. But I’ll always remember how he appeared in Wade’s embrace after the 2012 NBA Finals.

Humble and meek, the young Durant has come a long way.

Greg Oden’s Triumphant Return

Just as it’s impossible to mention the name of Michael Jordan without thinking of Sam Bowie, it’s equally difficult to think of Kevin Durant without Greg Oden.

Oden was believed to be the second coming of Bill Russell back when he was dominating college basketball, and for the Portland Trail Blazers, the decision to use the first overall pick in the 2007 NBA Draft to select Oden (instead of Durant) was easy enough to understand.

Unfortunately for Oden, he would play just 82 games over his first five years in the league and would eventually be waived by the Blazers after undergoing a fifth micro fracture knee surgery in February 2012.

After spending the 2012-13 season away from the game, after an edict to curb spending had come from the Miami HEAT’s ownership group, the club made the decision to trade Joel Anthony to the Boston Celtics in what amounted to a salary dump. The departures of Anthony and Mike Miller—two vital contributors to the HEAT’s championship success—played an indirect role in James departing for Cleveland some years later, but that’s another story for another day.

Part of the reason why the HEAT opted to send Anthony packing was because they thought they could get similar production from the 25-year-old former first overall pick. Best part? Oden would only cost the HEAT about one-fifth of what Anthony would, including luxury tax charges.

Internally, the HEAT kicked the idea around a bit before deciding to take a flier on Oden. He was still just 25 years old and Miami only needed him to give them some spot minutes here and there.

During the 2013 preseason, Oden wasn’t able to get on the floor on this particular night at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center, but he was kind enough to chat with me, anyway. I met Oden outside of the locker room after the game was over. In our one-on-one conversation, the center told me what he’d endured over the past few years. He hadn’t been traveling with the Blazers and cited only the love of his family and his dream of salvaging somewhat of a career as the things that kept him from self-destructing.

In the years since, Oden has battled depression and has done his best to remain close to the game, even though his knees have consistently reminded him that they have other ideas.

What I’ll remember most about my conversation with Oden that night was his conviction and the simple answer he provided when I asked him exactly what he hoped to get out of his tenure with the HEAT.

“…to walk off healthy,” is what he told me.

Sadly, it simply wasn’t meant to be.

Oden went on to play just 23 games for the HEAT. He played about seven cumulative playoff minutes for the club en route to their succumbing to the Spurs in five games in the 2014 NBA Finals.

Polite and reserved, Oden had a slight limp when he walked toward me at Barclays Center on that October night. And as we parted ways, I remembered hoping that it all worked out for him.

It didn’t.

Years later, after attending the NBA’s 2015 Las Vegas Summer League, I ran into Oden at McCarren International Airport. We exchanged pleasantries, but he wasn’t interested in conversing with me.

I had a feeling I knew why.

Visiting Kemba Walker In Charlotte

A city with a proud basketball tradition, Mo Bamba and Cole Anthony will now carry the cross for Gotham.

If they’re lucky, they’ll follow in the footsteps of Kemba Walker.

For as long as I’ve known Walker, he’s been quiet and humble, but when I paid him a visit in Charlotte back in January 2015, I was startled by the tremendous growth he’d experienced—both physically and mentally.

After Steve Clifford wrapped up practice, Walker found me in the corner of the team’s practice facility and we shared memories of the night he was drafted. That night, in New York City, Walker assured me that he would put everything he had into proving to Michael Jordan that his team had made a smart decision in drafting the undersized UConn product.

In the years that followed, Walker lived up to those expectations, and more. Despite relocating his family to Charlotte, he remained connected with his hometown of the Bronx and made it his personal duty to pave the way for New York City’s next torchbearer.

What stood out most about the encounter with Walker was the pride that he had when he told me all about what it took for him to secure the funds necessary to refurbish courts in the Sack-Wern housing development where he grew up in the Soundview section of the Bronx.

I told Walker that there were quite a few that expected him to be named an All-Star in the coming years, and he shrugged the thought off. Walker assured me that what was most important to him was simply being renowned as a kid who works hard and one who serves as an inspiration to his teammates, his family and, most importantly, those in New York City that were told that they were too small or not good enough. 

Speak with Walker today and ask what motivates him, he’ll surely tell you it’s memories of his parents going to work under all circumstances. A first-generation American with Caribbean lineage, like my parents, Walker’s came to America many moons ago with nothing but summer clothes and dreams.

Growing up in the Bronx, Walker could relate, except that his dreams were draped in a bubble coat.

Walker’s eyes opened wide and he beamed at me before admitting that it wasn’t until sometime after he participated in the McDonald’s All-American game in 2008 that he thought he had a chance…

On draft night, he assured me that he’d make the most of it, and seven years later, in Charlotte, it was obvious that he had.

As fate would have it, in 2017, Walker and I found ourselves standing at center court at Madison Square Garden shortly after he’d received the phone call letting him know that he’d been named an All-Star for the first time in his career. It was fair to say he’d live up to his billing. Of all places, it was in Madison Square Garden—where he’d become a household name during the 2011 Big East tournament—that Walker reflected.

There’s still much further for Walker to go, but observing him lead his team on the practice floor and do all that he could to be exemplary on a regular afternoon back in January 2015—it was refreshing. And it sure was memorable.

Hanging Out With Jeff Hornacek

Perhaps it was Phil Jackson’s affinity for the triangle, or maybe it was the belief that he wasn’t ready to return to the professional coaching ranks, but Jeff Hornacek’s being hired as head coach of the New York Knicks back in 2016 caught everyone by surprise.

Especially those, including me, who hung out with Horancek during the NBA’s Draft Combine in 2016.

The Combine took place just three months after Derek Fisher had been surprisingly fired by the Knicks, and questions as to who his successor would be were rampant.

In this day and age, it’s difficult to move in stealth, but, to their credit, the Knicks and Hornacek managed to do exactly that.

Days after the combine, Hornacek was named head coach of the Knicks, and after doing a little digging, it was easy to connect the dots and get confirmation of the fact that he was interviewing with the club’s brass in Chicago. That and the fact that he maintained close relationships with other team personnel is probably what brought Hornacek to Michael Jordan’s Steakhouse at the Intercontinental Hotel on Chicago’s Magnificent Mile.

For a few hours, after the duties of the day had ended, writers had filed their stories, scouts had sent in their reports and agents had finished their socializing. For those few hours, dozens of men of different disciplines were united by their love of basketball, and all were equal.

I was a part of a group of a half-dozen who spent a few hours socializing with Hornacek. Soft spoken and friendly, he didn’t make the conversation about him, and interestingly enough, nobody bothered to ask what he was doing there.

He told a story about how his wife had given him a clever idea as to how to teach young players proper shooting mechanics. The tactic involved tape and, without giving away his secret, using it to tape certain fingers together in order to dissuade improper finger manipulation of the basketball.

He talked about his playing days in Utah, told some stories of Karl Malone and overall, admitted to missing coaching.

Hornacek probably knew that he had a big payday coming from the Knicks, because although he was only drinking tonic water, he paid a pretty hefty bill for many in attendance, including myself.

There aren’t many media guys who can boast that they’ve been bought drinks by the head coach of the New York Knicks.

Even though we didn’t find out about Hornacek’s hiring until a few days later, it still counts.

*****

Just as NBA players lace up their sneakers, hard-working journalists put on their walking shoes. As fans of the game, we spend an incalculable amount of time watching and observing with the hope of seeing something incredible happen. That’s why we continue watching when our favorite teams are down by 20 points or continue watching a playoff series when a team finds itself in an 0-3 hole.

The thrill of the chase and the fortunate of witnessing the improbable—that’s why most of us are here.

For someone like me, it’s often the opportunity to cover the game from up close and the ability to find oneself in a moment or a situation where you hear or see something that stays with you forever.

Fortunately, I’ve found myself in those situations a few times over the past five seasons.

These are four of many. And if I’m lucky, in the future, there will be many, many more.

Moke Hamilton is a Deputy Editor and Columnist for Basketball Insiders.

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NBA Daily: Will Philadelphia Struggle From Downtown?

Do the Philadelphia 76ers have enough outside shooting talent to spread the floor on the offensive end? Jordan Hicks takes a look.

Jordan Hicks

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It’s only been one game, and this could likely be an overreaction, but will the Philadelphia 76ers struggle this season from beyond-the-arc? With the departure of two highly capable shooters in Marco Belinelli and Ersan Ilyasova, it might not be insane to say this could turn into a large problem throughout the season.

Last season for the 76ers, Belinelli finished 38.5 percent from three and Ilyasova finished at 36.1 percent. While neither of those percentages is staggering, both sit above the league average, and those players shoot and make threes at a consistent pace. Neither player was necessarily streaky from downtown, so you knew what to expect from them on a nightly basis.

What the two players brought more than anything was gravity. Each game, teams had to strategically plan how to stop them from making three-point shots. Players had to maintain certain spots on the floor defensively, which in turn left offensive players in advantageous positions. Losing both Belinelli and Ilyasova allows defenses to suck in closer to the paint so they can better defend Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons at what they do best – attack the rim.

This is precisely what the Boston Celtics did to the 76ers on Tuesday night, and the final score definitely told the tale. The Celtics ended up winning, 105-87. Boston is a talented squad, and playing at the TD Garden is never an easy task, but the 76ers are too good to lose by high double-digits.

Apart from Boston’s stellar defense, Philadelphia’s mark from the perimeter paints a clear picture of what they might struggle with throughout the season. They finished 5-for-26, good for 19.7 percent.

It’s not like they don’t have any help from three. Robert Covington led the NBA in catch-and-shoot three-point percentage last season and J.J. Redick shot a scorching career 41.5 percent from deep. Their third option from three is likely Dario Saric, who finished last season at 39.3 percent. But after those three the drop-off is significant. Embiid might come in next, and he shot a poor 30.8 percent last season.

By the end of the season, the top three scorers for Philadelphia could likely be Simmons, Embiid and last year’s first-round pick, Markelle Fultz. Not one of those players can shoot the three consistently, certainly not at an efficient mark. Simmons and Fultz have never even made a three-point field goal in their young careers.

All three of those players have the ability to score efficiently around the rim, and they’ll likely get their buckets. But with fewer players on the roster to worry about as a deep threat, teams will mirror Boston’s success and crowd the paint.

If Brett Brown continues to play Saric, Covington and Redick in limited minutes – they played just eight minutes together on Tuesday – most of their lineups will only ever feature two above average three-point shooters. This can begin to get highly problematic for the 76ers as the season progresses. As previously mentioned, teams will just stuff the area around the hoop with great rim protectors and only worry about crashing the boards when mid-range jumpers clank off the basket.

Teams that had the most success last season, à la the Houston Rockets and Golden State Warriors, had at minimum three high-level deep threats on the floor at all times. This allowed them to spread the offense, keep defenses guessing and find an open shooter after throwing the ball around from player to player or cutting to the basket. With the fact that multiple shooters on the court can spread out the defense and essentially keep them on their toes, all it takes is an intelligent cut or a crafty pass to find someone open at the rim. If teams don’t have enough efficient shooters on the floor, defenses can just suck in and stop players going to the hoop.

But when there are three or more plus shooters on the court, defenders have a really difficult decision to make. Do you try and play help defense by attempting to stop the shot at the rim? This can leave your opponent open for an easy three. Will help defense get there in time to defend the three? Maybe, but then another quick pass can find another open shooter. So do you stay on your man? Sure, but then you give up an easy basket at the rim.

That last paragraph was elementary. Most teams and fans understand this concept. The importance of efficient shooters in today’s league is at an all-time high. The 76ers have a very talented, young team. Simmons and Embiid are a phenomenal duo to build around. But their lack of players that hold any sort of gravity from three-point land could really give them struggles.

Alas, we are only one game into the season. A handful of teams have yet to play, so there is still plenty of basketball to be had. The 76ers are still monstrous on defense and can obviously generate baskets on the offensive end. Thanks in part to Simmons, they are one of the most electric teams in transition, and can often score with ease around the hoop.

Are the 76ers a playoff team? That’s essentially a lock. Can they go deep in the playoffs? It certainly appears so. But in order for them to make a legitimate run to the Finals, they’ll need to find more efficiency from the three-point line. Not simply because they could use those points, but because they need that spacing for their offense to function at an elite level.

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NBA Daily: Warriors Depth Shines on Opening Night

The Warriors have lost some key veterans but opening night showed they still have the depth to reign supreme, writes David Yapkowitz.

David Yapkowitz

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With the Golden State Warriors emerging victorious on ring night behind big performances from Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry, and the summer addition of DeMarcus Cousins, it’s easy to see why many have penciled them in for a three-peat.

When Cousins returns to the court, the Warriors will be able to play a lineup of five All-Stars with Durant, Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green. With all of that star talent they possess, it’s easy to overlook the surrounding depth that they’ve managed to accumulate.

A successful organization like the Warriors becomes successful because they have a great front office in place who can identify talent and a good coaching staff who can develop that talent. Having superstars in place certainly helps, but all championship teams need to have that key depth.

Last night, the Warriors showed that they don’t just consist of their superstars, they’ve got some weapons on the team that are very capable of having big nights of their own.

The past few seasons, the Warriors depth in the frontcourt consisted of older veterans such as Zaza Pachulia, JaVale McGee and David West. Pachulia and McGee signed elsewhere while West retired. With Cousins still recovering, that leaves the majority of the frontcourt minutes to younger, more inexperienced players such as Damion Jones and Kevon Looney.

Neither Jones nor Looney has seen much action during their first few seasons in the league. Looney had his fourth-year contract option declined a year ago, and this summer he received very little interest in free agency before re-signing with the Warriors. Prior to last night, it seemed as if Jones would follow the same fate as the team has until Oct. 31 to pick up his fourth-year option.

If last night was any indication, however, the Warriors would be wise to keep both around for as long as possible.

Making his first ever career start, Jones passed his initial test. He looked like a perfect compliment to the Warriors All-Stars. He ran the pick and roll to perfection, finishing with 12 points on 6-7 shooting from the field. He can finish around the rim, and he also had three assists.

Defensively, he blocked three shots and matched up well with Steven Adams all night.

Coming off the bench, Looney had a productive game of his own. He had a double-double with ten points and ten rebounds. Eight of his rebounds came on the offensive end, helping the Warriors gain extra possessions. He also had two assists and two blocked shots.

Both big men, Jones in particular since he’s the starter, will have a few more tests coming up as the Warriors travel to Utah and Denver. Rudy Gobert and Nikola Jokic await them. It will be interesting to see how they respond to that. For the duration that Cousins remains out, the Warriors will be relying quite a bit on their young big men.

Should either one falter at any point, the Warriors still have Jordan Bell waiting in the wings. Bell proved to be a second-round steal last season, but only saw six minutes of action on opening night. Bell brings a bit of a different skill set to the table than Jones and Looney. He’s a versatile big who can guard multiple positions.

As the season goes on, what was once thought of as an area of weakness for the Warriors, might turn out to be a position of strength. And if that occurs, that bodes ill for the rest of the league.

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NBA Daily: Instant Reactions From Day One

With the NBA beginning its new season last night, Matt John analyzes all that’s happened so far in the season’s first two NBA games.

Matt John

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The NBA is BACK everybody!

After an agonizing five-month wait, the 2018-2019 season was born Tuesday night. As always, the NBA likes to start off the season with only two games, but with four teams who should play a big role in how this season turns out.

This year, it was Boston against Philadelphia and Golden State against Oklahoma City. The best part about it is that, this time, nobody had to leave with a season-ending leg injury five minutes into the game, so it’s already better than last year’s opening night!

Now, of course, it’s a long season – which to every NBA junkie is a good thing – but since we only got a taste of what this year could bring, it’s only appropriate to air out some knee-jerk reactions after day one of the new NBA year.

Some of these reactions will be about the players. Others will be about the team in general.

Game One: Boston Celtics 105, Philadelphia 76ers 87

The Atlantic Division rivals had a rematch of last year’s Eastern Conference semifinals. Despite what the final score may say, this was a tight game until Boston pulled away in the fourth. Both teams had the jitters, as the very first shot this season was an airball three-point attempt by Robert Covington. Boston missed its first five shot attempts, and Philadelphia made only one of its first six tries.

When both finally shook off the rust, it was a game of runs. When one team got going, the other followed suit. The Celtics may have led for most of the game, but the Sixers refused to back down.

What’s to think of how these teams did in their season opener? Let’s take a look.

Philadelphia 76ers

  • Ben Simmons looked every bit like the reigning Rookie of the Year. In 43 minutes, Simmons put up a near-triple-double, scoring 19 points, corralling 15 rebounds and dishing out eight assists. He didn’t do much to disprove the skeptics who constantly point at his almost non-existent jump shot, but Simmons is such a freight train in transition that it might not even matter.
  • Joel Embiid put up a usual Joel Embiid stat line – 23 points, 10 rebounds and two blocks, but he coughed up five turnovers and even committed a frustration foul or two. Aron Baynes and Al Horford always seem to give Embiid fits because they make him earn his buckets. If the Sixers hope to get past the Celtics, Embiid has to overcome their pesky defense.
  • Markelle Fultz looked a bit out of place. Putting up five points on 2-for-7 shooting, committing three turnovers and recording the lowest plus-minus with a minus-16 isn’t a good look for him. Still, he wasn’t a complete disaster, and Philadelphia knows he’s a work in progress.
  • The real disaster for the Sixers was their turnovers. Philadelphia led the league in turnovers last year with 16.4 per game. If they hope to improve on that, Tuesday night wasn’t the best start, as they surrendered 16 giveaways.
  • As talented as they are, the Sixers have some holes that need to be filled, primarily with their shooting. Marco Belinelli and Ersan Ilyasova gave the Sixers more floor spacing to help them go on that late-season surge last season. With them gone, the Sixers might have a spacing problem if neither Mike Muscala nor Wilson Chandler fills the void.

Boston Celtics

  • Coming into the season, many believed the Celtics’ calling card would be their depth, and the opening game showed why. The most notable statistic for them: Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward combined for 6-for-26 from the field, yet Boston still won by 18 points against a team many believe will be its toughest opponent in the conference.
  • While Irving looked off his game, Hayward definitely looked rusty. It’s been said that Hayward still lacks explosion off his left foot, and it definitely looked that way. Still, Hayward hit a few long jumpers and showed hustle and great defense. Even if he won’t be 100 percent from the get-go, the Celtics can afford to be patient.
  • Another telling statistic: The Celtics top nine rotation guys were in the game on a range from 19 to 30 minutes. If this is is what their minutes output will look like this season, then the Celtics’ stamina will be at an unfairly high level when the playoffs come around.
  • Both Jayson Tatum and Terry Rozier continue to prove that their performance from last postseason was no fluke. Tatum continued to demolish any defender Philadelphia threw at him. Rozier, on the other hand, played well enough that Brad Stevens decided to go with him in the finishing lineup instead of Irving. To be fair, Irving couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn.
  • The Celtics’ versatility also shined. Their starting lineup was Irving, Tatum, Hayward, Horford, and Jaylen Brown. To start the second half, they replaced Hayward with Baynes. Before Philadelphia waved the white flag, the Celtics’ finishing lineup was Horford, Hayward, Tatum, Rozier, and Marcus Smart. Should they stay healthy, the Celtics have limitless options.

Game Two: Golden State Warriors 108, Oklahoma City Thunder 100

We got round three of Russell Westbrook vs. Kevin Durant. The only problem? No Westbrook, as he sat out to rest his knee. Despite missing both Westbrook and Andre Roberson, the Thunder made the Warriors work for the win. Though the game looked like a typical Warriors route in the beginning, the Thunder impressively kept up with the reigning NBA champions until the very end.

The Warriors won because, well, they’re the Warriors. They’re a ridiculously talented team that shouldn’t be slowing down anytime soon. Although, this matchup should become all the tighter when the Thunder become fully healthy. Onto the reactions!

Oklahoma City Thunder

  • The headline for these guys: Moral Victory. OKC gave Golden State all they could handle – even taking the lead at one point – down to the final minute. That’s not an easy task when you’re down your best player and arguably your best defender. Even if the season started with a loss, the Thunder can only build off of this.
  • Goodness, the Thunder might just be the most athletic team in the league. Aside from world-class athletes such as Westbrook and Paul George, OKC has some high-flyers including Terrance Ferguson, Jerami Grant, Nerlens Noel and Hamidou Diallo. No matter how good they’ll be this season, we should brace ourselves for some exciting dunks from the Thunder this season.
  • Props should go to George, Steven Adams, and Dennis Schroder for not backing down in their time of adversity – especially Schroder. Filling in for a former MVP candidate on a good team is no easy task, so his performance should really excite Thunder fans.
  • While the Thunder are in salary cap hell and it may be difficult, they need to do everything in their power to get more shooting. Last season they tied for No. 24 in three-point shooting percentage at 35.4 percent from deep. The only team that ranked lower was the Spurs. If they want to make noise, they need a pure shooter on that team. It could open up so many possibilities for them.
  • Billy Donovan could find himself on the hot seat this season. Since Kevin Durant’s departure, the Thunder have only mustered three playoff wins in the last two years. Now that George is committed long-term and the Thunder have re-tooled, he has to feel good about himself after their game against the Warriors.

Golden State Warriors

  • No matter how much fans outside of the Bay Area hate them together, Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant make beautiful basketball together. On their ring night opener at Oracle Arena, they combined for 59 points on 20-for-41 shooting and 15 assists. It may be frustrating, but it has always been a spectacle. Even if this is the last year they play together, Durant and Curry should go down as one of the league’s most potent scoring duos to ever play together.
  • Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for Klay Thompson or Draymond Green – at least in regards to this game. Neither of them was impressive to start the season. Thompson had 15 points on 5-for-20 shooting, including 1-for-8 from the perimeter. Green had two points on 1-for-6 shooting with six turnovers. His 13 rebounds made up for it, but it still was not his best performance.
  • Who would have guessed that centers Damian Jones and Kevon Looney would play a big part in the Warriors toppling the Thunder? The two of them combined for 22 points and 13 rebounds on 11-for-18 shooting. If either of them has a legitimate role on the team, then the Warriors may have more frontcourt depth than we might’ve thought.
  • It feels weird to say that the Warriors aren’t actually fully healthy at the moment with DeMarcus Cousins out indefinitely. It’s almost as if him being on the team is overkill. Though the Warriors’ act has grown tiresome, thinking of what this team could be with Cousins should excite any basketball junkie out there.

Overall, it was a satisfactory day one for the young season. The biggest takeaway is that the NBA has returned, which should make everyone as giddy as can be.

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