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Kevin Durant and Lessons Learned on the NBA’s Easy Road

Kevin Durant may be learning a lesson that LeBron James already taught us, writes Moke Hamilton.

Moke Hamilton

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It’s June 1, 2017.

There he stood.

Isolated against his muse, Kevin Durant looked LeBron James in the eyes as he dribbled. At center court, as Oracle Arena erupted into a frenzy, Durant knew that five years after James had robbed him of his glory, the only thing separating him from finally wrapping his long, slender fingers around the Larry O’Brien trophy were 78 seconds.

Durant attempted a crossover, but trembling with excitement, he nearly lost control of the ball. He regained it only momentarily before being stripped by LeBron. Still, with the Warriors ahead by 11 points, his final turnover of the game would ultimately become just a meaningless footnote in the throes of Durant’s to this point tragic history.

On the ensuing play, after a Kyrie Irving miss, with arms heavy as lead, Durant’s heart raced faster than Russell Westbrook on a breakaway.

As he crossed halfcourt, with tears streaming down his face, Durant wiped his eyes with his jersey before doubling over.

The game he’d given everything to had finally repaid him.

It took a tap on the back from Andre Iguodala to remind Durant that the game was still going on, and before he knew it, Stephen Curry’s final made three-pointer caused him to raise his arms to the heavens.

The confetti rained and the champagne showered. After winning his first NBA title, Durant would eventually make his way to the podium cradling the Bill Russell Finals MVP trophy.

Seemingly a tad nervous, he meekly asked a strange question.

“Can I sit this right here?”

After he’d received approval, Durant, the 2017 NBA Finals MVP, nodded appreciatively of the fact that he didn’t have to let his trophy out of his sight.

From that moment forth, he told anyone who’d listen his story.

From nothing, he’d come. A lack of self-confidence and uncertainty of his supremacy, Durant silently and begrudgingly existed in the shadows as an inlier. He watched Kobe Bryant and LeBron James get the adulation he’d longed for and grew weary of the shadows cast over him by Stephen Curry and even Russell Westbrook, his own teammate.

He eventually took his backpack, a pair of Nikes and the enormous chip on his shoulder to Oakland in search of validation and vindication. Now, on this day, 11 months later, he’d found it.

“It was 55 seconds left,” Durant said in 2017.

“I went over to half court and I bent down. I’m like, ’Is this really happening?’ And Draymond was like, ‘Keep playing to the end.’ Andre is like, ‘Keep playing, we have like 50 seconds left.’ And I’m like, ‘Bro, we’re about to win the title…’

“You can call us a super team, but it’s been a lot of super teams that hasn’t worked. We came together and we continued to just believe in each other. We sacrificed, and we’re champions now.”

His voice raised slightly as he finished his thought.

Champion.

It had a nice ring to it.

As Durant looked around the room at some familiar faces and many new ones, he probably thought that this was something he could get used to.

Just one year later, it’d seemed he had.

* * * * * *

History often repeats itself, but nothing is perfect, not even the basketball gods.

Game 3 of the 2018 NBA Finals was no exception.

The Warriors, despite struggles from Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson, were improbably leading the desperate Cleveland Cavaliers by three points.

As LeBron James darted into the paint with a minute remaining in a game his team had to find a way to win, Durant stood within an arm’s length of Kevin Love, who was helplessly relegated to floor-spacing duties on the right wing.

Durant watched James put his season in the hands of Tristan Thompson, and when Thompson failed to deliver in the biggest moment, Durant again found the ball in his hands. Again, he was staring James in the eyes. Tired and badly beaten, though, the 33-year-old king was only a remnant of the superhero we’d grown accustomed to witnessing.

As Durant instructed his teammates to clear out and allow the duo to go one-on-one, he got the satisfaction of knowing that LeBron wanted no part of him.

Rodney Hood did James a favor and switched onto Durant. Without hesitation, Durant took one dribble to his left and drilled a three-pointer from downtown Cleveland.

Those final three points weren’t the last ones scored in Game 3, but they were the last ones that mattered.

As Durant clinched Game 3 for his Warriors, he was apathetic. He exhaled and began to slowly walk toward his bench as Stephen Curry and Draymond Green danced around him like a totem pole.

One game later, after completing the sweep, there were no tears of joy. As Durant accepted the Bill Russell Finals MVP trophy yet again, he slapped hands with his teammates, but his body language was unmistakable.

Been there, done that.

Somewhere from that time to his visit to the podium shortly thereafter, Durant must have lost track of his MVP trophy. Unlike the year prior, when he carried it around like a loaf of fresh baked bread, this time, he discarded it like an empty eggshell.

As the two-time MVP took his seat, Draymond Green retrieved the trophy and plopped it on the table in front of him. He looked at it, smiled, and used his left hand to slide it away.

“When you experience something for the first time and you do it again, those emotions aren’t going to be there as they were the first time,” Durant said during his press conference.

He touched on a range of topics before providing an answer that was truly insightful.

“Two years in a row MVP. How are you feeling about that?”

“It feels great to go out there and win a championship with these guys,” Durant said.

“I’m just so happy for Nick Young, Quinn Cook, their first championships. It feels great that we can go out there and give an experience to guys that haven’t been here before, just like they did to me last year…

“It feels great that we can do that. Just the brotherhood that we have in that locker room, and just the family atmosphere that we take on the road, not just the players, but support staff and everybody in the organization…

“It feels good to kind of win it for them.”

In that moment, somewhat contrary to what has been said about Durant, he sounded nothing like a player who felt like he needed to win for himself.

Not anymore, anyway.

“Former players and players now that got a lot to say about what I did, they know how I play,” Durant said defiantly.

“They know exactly what I bring. They know. They know. They understand when they get on the court with me or they check up with me. They know what it is.”

Kevin Durant, two-time champion, looked and sounded every bit like someone who had exorcised his demons. On this journey, though, he’s probably realized that there’s a difference—both in public perception and personal satisfaction—in winning with the deck stacked in your favor versus winning in spite of insurmountable odds.

* * * * * *

Six years ago, in Miami, LeBron James’ eyes lit up as he himself cradled the Larry O’Brien trophy for the first time.

Coincidentally, it was Kevin Durant who he toppled.

Durant sat in the locker room of the American Airlines Arena and sobbed with James Harden and Russell Westbrook.

James, on top of the world, carried his Finals MVP trophy around with him, just like Durant would five years later.

Like a child who’d just met his new puppy for the first time, in Miami, it was Christmas morning. James hugged everyone he knew as he made his way to the podium, and on the way back to the locker room, as he struggled with carrying the heavy hardware, he was asked if he needed a hand.

“Nope, I got it,” James said.

He’d carried all the weight for all these years. It was only fitting he carried the fruit.

The next year, when his Miami Heat defeated the San Antonio Spurs to capture back-to-back NBA Championships, James had grown up. No longer an excited child cradling his newfound puppy, he seemed more interested in simply protecting his turf.

Four years later, though, we saw a completely different scene.

With Kyrie Irving by his side, as James became the first Finals MVP to lead his team back from a 3-1 series deficit against these same Warriors, James collapsed to floor at Oracle Arena and cried uncontrollably.

He embraced Irving and told him he loved him and kept repeating aloud that they’d done it, almost as if he himself couldn’t believe that they had.

“I set out a goal, two years when I came back, to bring a championship to this city,” James said in his teary-filled monologue.

“I gave everything that I had. I put my heart, my blood, my sweat, my tears into this game…

“Against all odds.”

When LeBron met with the media after that Game 7, he was asked whether that championship meant more to him than those won in Miami.

“Absolutely,” he said without hesitation.

“Just knowing what our city has been through, northeast Ohio has been through… Our fans, they ride or die, no matter what’s been going on, no matter the Browns, the Indians, the Cavs and so on, and all other sports teams. They continue to support us. And for us to be able to end this, end this drought, our fans deserve it. They deserve it.

“It was for them.”

It took a circuitous journey for LeBron to learn an important lesson: true victory isn’t just a destination that one needs to get to, it’s every bit as much about the route one takes and the terrain one traverses.

On more than one occasion, Durant admitted James to be the only player he’s met that he considered his peer. The two continue to have a relationship that is every bit as friendly and unique as it is competitive and professionally hostile.

Of all NBA players, James is the only one who faced the level of scrutiny he has and mostly lived to fulfill the gargantuan expectations had of him. He can relate to Durant in ways nobody else can, so don’t be surprised if one day, off on the side, Durant asks him if he’d trade the two championships he won for Miami for the one he won for Cleveland.

Despite what James may say publicly, anyone who knows him knows the truth.

* * * * * *

With two championship rings in tow, Durant trails LeBron in the medal count, and since great players measure themselves by hardware, Durant knows he’ll need at least two more rings to be the rightful successor to the king’s throne.

At that point, should the Warriors have achieved their four titles and have done it anywhere nearly as dominantly as they have these past two seasons—they’ve gone 32-6 in the playoffs—his competitive itch may need to be scratched.

No, the Warriors didn’t ruin the NBA, but they did ruin its competitive balance. And while that might be good for ratings, it’s not good for much else, and certainly not for what true greats need more than anything else—real competition.

To a competitor, succeeding in the face of daunting odds is what oxygen is to fire. It’s necessary fuel. And although there’s no shame in succeeding with the deck stacked in your favor, there’s similarly no joy.

Sure, Durant passed the exam. It just happened to be an open-book test to which he had the answers.

When he spoke of the likes of Nick Young and Quinn Cook—those who hadn’t yet been to the mountaintop—one couldn’t help but to wonder whether he thought of those left behind in Oklahoma City.

We now know for sure that LeBron was thinking about those in Cleveland.

Sure, Kevin Durant may have nothing left to prove, but strangely, something about his second championship seemed off.

Deep down inside, he realized that while there are many routes to success, the easiest isn’t necessarily the most fulfilling.

The next time Durant finds himself isolated with LeBron James, hopefully, it’ll be behind closed doors.

And then, without question, James will reveal to him that this is the greatest lesson he’s ever learned.

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NBA Daily: Tyronn Lue is the Right Coach for the Clippers

Is Lue the right coach for the Los Angeles Clippers? David Yapkowitz thinks so.

David Yapkowitz

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When Doc Rivers was first hired by the Los Angeles Clippers in 2013, the expectation was that he would be the one to guide the franchise into respectability. A laughingstock of the NBA for pretty much their entire existence, marred by bad coaching, bad management and bad ownership, Rivers was supposed to help change all of that.
For the most part, he did.

Rivers arrived from the Boston Celtics with the 2008 championship, and he helped the Celtics regain their standing as one of the NBA’s elite teams. The Clippers were a perennial playoff contender under him and were even in the conversation for being a possible championship contender. The Lob City Clippers led by Chris Paul and Blake Griffin certainly were talked about as being a title contender, and this season’s group led by Kawhi Leonard and Paul George were definitely in the mix as well.

Not only did Rivers steady the team on the court though, but he was also a very steadying presence off the court. He guided the franchise through the Donald Sterling controversy and he was a positive voice for the team as they navigated the bubble and the ongoing charge for social reform in the country.

But when things go wrong with a team, the coach is usually the one who ends up taking the fall. While Rivers did bring the Clippers to a level of respectability the franchise has never known, his record was not without blemishes. Most notably was his team’s inability to close out playoff series’ after holding three games to one on advantages two separate occasions.

In 2015, the Clippers had a 3-1 lead over the Houston Rockets only to squander that lead and lose Game 7 on the road. In Game 6, their shots stopped falling and neither Paul nor Griffin could do anything to halt the Rockets onslaught.

This season, in an incredibly similar fashion, the Clippers choked away a 3-1 lead over the Denver Nuggets and ended up getting blown out the second half of Game 7. Just like before, the offense stalled multiple games and neither Leonard nor George could make a difference.

There were also questions about Rivers’ rotations and his seeming inability to adjust to his opponents. In the end, something had to change, and whether it’s right or wrong, the coach usually ends up taking the fall.

Enter Tyronn Lue. Lue, like Rivers, is also a former NBA player and has a great deal of respect around the league. He came up under Rivers, getting his first coaching experience as an assistant in Boston, and then following Rivers to the Clippers.

He ended up joining David Blatt’s staff in Cleveland in 2014, and when Blatt was fired in the middle of the 2015-16 season, Lue was promoted to head coach. In the playoffs that year, Lue guided the Cavaliers to victory in their first 10 playoff games. They reached the Finals where they famously came back from a 3-1 deficit against the 73-9 Golden State Warriors to win the franchise’s first championship.

The Cavaliers reached the Finals each full year of Lue’s tenure as head coach, but he was let go at the start of the 2018-19 season when the team started 0-6 after the departure of LeBron James.

In the 2019 offseason, Lue emerged as the leading candidate for the Los Angeles Lakers head coaching job, before he ultimately rejected the team’s offer. After rejoining Rivers in LA with the Clippers for a year, he once again emerged as a leading candidate for multiple head coaching positions this offseason before agreeing to terms with the Clippers.

Following the Clippers series loss to the Nuggets, many players openly talked about the team’s lack of chemistry and how that may have played a factor in the team’s postseason demise. Adding two-star players in Leonard and George was always going to be a challenge from a chemistry standpoint, and the Clippers might have secured the perfect man to step up to that challenge.

During his time in Cleveland, Lue was praised for his ability to manage a locker room that included James, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love. In Game 7 against the Warriors, Lue reportedly challenged James at halftime and ended up lighting a fire that propelled the Cavaliers to the championship.

Lue’s ability to deal with star egos isn’t just limited to his coaching tenure. During his playing days, Lue was a trusted teammate with the Los Angeles Lakers during a time when Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant weren’t seeing eye to eye. He also played with Michael Jordan during Jordan’s Washington Wizard days.

Now, he’ll be tasked with breaking through and leading the Clippers to a place where no Clipper team has ever been before. He’ll be expected to finish what Rivers was unable to accomplish and guide the Clippers to an NBA championship.

For one, he’ll have to change the Clippers offensive attack. This past season, the Clippers relied too much on an isolation heavy offense centered around Leonard and George. That style of play failed in the playoffs when after failing to adjust, the Clippers kept taking tough shot after tough shot while the Nuggets continued to run their offense and get good shots.

With the Cavaliers, Lue showed his ability to adjust his offense and work to his player’s strengths. In the 2018 Playoffs, Lue employed a series of off-ball screens involving Love and Kyle Korver with James reading the defense and making the correct read to whoever was in the best position to score.

When playing with James, the offense sometimes tends to stagnate with the other four players standing around and waiting for James to make his move. Lue was able to get the other players to maintain focus and keep them engaged when James had the ball in his hands. Look for him to try and do something similar for when either Leonard or George has the ball in their hands.

He’s already got a player on the roster in Landry Shamet who can play that Korver role as the designated shooter on the floor running through off-ball screens and getting open. Both Leonard and George have become efficient enough playmakers to be able to find open shooters and cutters. That has to be Lue’s first task to tweak the offense to find ways to keep the rest of the team engaged and active when their star players are holding the ball.

The defensive end is going to be something he’ll need to adjust as well. The Clippers have some of the absolute best individual defensive players in the league. Leonard is a two-time Defensive Player of the Year, George was a finalist for the award in 2019 and Patrick Beverley is a perennial All-Defensive Team selection.

When the team was locked in defensively this season, there wasn’t a team in the league that could score on them. The problem for them was they seemingly couldn’t stay engaged on the defensive end consistently enough. The other issue was Rivers’ inability to adjust his defense to his opponent. Against the Nuggets, Nikola Jokic had a field day whenever Montrez Harrell was guarding him.

Lue’s primary task will be to get this team to maintain their defensive intensity throughout the season, as well as recognize what matchups are and aren’t working. Both Ivica Zubac and JaMychal Green were more effective frontcourt defenders in the postseason than Harrell was. Look for Lue to play to his team’s strengths, as he always has, and to trot out a heavy dose of man-to-man defense.

Overall, Lue was the best hire available given the candidates. He’s got a strong rapport among star players. He’s made it to the finals multiple times and won a championship as a head coach. And he already has experience working with Leonard and George.

Given the potential free agent status of both Leonard and George in the near future, the Clippers have a relatively small window of championship contention. Lue was in a similar situation in Cleveland when James’ pending free agency in the summer of 2018 was also a factor. That time around, Lue delivered. He’ll be ready for this new challenge.

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NBA Daily: The Lakers’ Third Scorer Is By Committee

The Los Angeles Lakers have a whole unit of third scoring options – and that’s why they’re one win from an NBA Championship.

David Yapkowitz

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One of the biggest questions surrounding the Los Angeles Lakers once the NBA bubble began was who was going to pick up the mantle of being the third scoring option.

Even before the 2019-20 season began, it was obvious that LeBron James and Anthony Davis would be the primary offensive weapons, but every elite team with championship aspirations needs another player or two they can rely on to contribute on the offensive end consistently.

The obvious choice was Kyle Kuzma. In his third year in the NBA, Kuzma was the lone member of the Lakers’ young core that hadn’t been shipped elsewhere. His name had come up in trade rumors as possibly being included in the package to New Orleans for Davis, but the Lakers were able to hang on to him. He put up 17.4 points per game over his first two seasons and had some questioning whether or not he had All-Star potential.

For the most part this season, he settled into that role for much of this season. With Davis in the fold and coming off the bench, his shot attempts dropped from 15.5 to 11.0, but he still managed to be the team’s third scorer with 12.8 points per game.

But here in the bubble, and especially in the playoffs, the Lakers’ role players have each taken turns in playing the supporting role to James and Davis. Everyone from Kuzma to Alex Caruso, to Dwight Howard, to Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, to Markieff Morris and even Rajon Rondo have had games where they’ve given the team that additional scoring boost.

Earlier in the bubble, James himself said they need Kuzma to be the team’s third-best player to win, but Kuzma himself believes that it’s always been by committee.

“We don’t have a third scorer, that’s not how our offense is built. Our offense is really AD and Bron, and everyone else plays team basketball,” Kuzma said on a postgame media call after Game 4 of the Finals. “We’ve had a long season, hopefully by now, you’ve seen how we play. Everyone steps up at different times, that’s what a team does.”

On this particular night, when the Miami HEAT got a pregame boost with the return of Bam Adebayo and wealth of confidence from their Game 3 win, it was Caldwell-Pope who stepped up and assumed the mantle of that third scoring option.

He finished Game 4 with 15 points on 50 percent shooting from the field and 37.5 percent from three-point range. He also dished out five assists and grabbed three rebounds. Perhaps his most crucial moments of the game came late in the fourth quarter with the Lakers desperately clinging to a slim lead and the Heat not going away.

He hit a big three-pointer in front of the Miami bench with 2:58 to go in the game, and then followed that up with a drive the rim and finish on the very next possession to give the Lakers some breathing room.

Caldwell-Pope has been one of the most consistent Lakers this postseason and he’s been one of their most consistent three-point threats at 38.5 percent on 5.3 attempts. He was actually struggling a bit with his outside shot before this game, but he always stayed ready.

“My teammates lean on me to pick up the energy on the defensive end and also make shots on the offensive end…I stayed within a rhythm, within myself and just played,” Caldwell-Pope said after the game. “You’re not going to knock down every shot you shoot, but just staying with that flow…Try to stay in the rhythm, that’s what I do. I try not to worry about it if I’m not getting shots. I know they are eventually going to come.”

Also giving the Lakers a big offensive boost in Game 4 was Caruso who had a couple of easy baskets at the rim and knocked down a three-pointer. He’s become one the Lakers best off the ball threats as well, making strong cuts to the rim or drifting to the open spot on the three-point line.

He’s had his share of games this postseason when it’s been his turn to step up as the Lakers additional scoring threat. During Game 4 against the Houston Rockets in the second round, Caruso dropped 16 points off the bench to help prevent the Rockets from tying the series up. In the closeout Game 6 of the Western Conference Finals against the Denver Nuggets, he had 11 points and finished the game in crunch time.

For him, it’s about staying ready and knowing that the ball is eventually going to come to whoever is open. When that happens, it’s up to the role players to take that pressure off James and Davis.

“Our third star or best player is whoever has the open shot. We know what AD and LeBron are going to bring to the table every night. They’re going to get their attention, they’re going to get their shots,” Caruso said after the game.

“It’s just about being ready to shoot. We have two of the best passers in the game, if not the best, so we know when we are open, we are going to get the ball. We have to be ready to do our job as soon as the ball gets to us.”

And if the Lakers are to close out the series and win the 2020 NBA championship, head coach Frank Vogel knows that it’s going to take a collective effort from the rest of the team, the way they’ve been stepping up all postseason.

“We need everybody to participate and contribute, and we’re a team-first team,” Vogel said after the game. “Obviously we have our two big horses, but everybody’s got to contribute that’s out there.”

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NBA Daily: Alex Caruso: The Lakers’ Unsung Hero

The Los Angeles Lakers are two wins from an NBA championship and Alex Caruso is just happy to play his role and contribute.

David Yapkowitz

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Alex Caruso has technically been an NBA player for three years now, but this season is his first on a regular NBA contract.

After going undrafted out of Texas A&M in 2016, he began his professional career as with the Philadelphia 76ers in summer league. He managed to make it to training camp with the Oklahoma City Thunder but was eventually cut and acquired by their the G League team, the Blue.

In the summer of 2017, he joined the Los Angeles Lakers for summer league, and he’s stuck with the team ever since. A strong performance in Las Vegas earned him the opportunity to sign a two-way contract with the Lakers for the 2017-18 season, meaning he’d spend most of his time with the South Bay Lakers in the G League.

The Lakers re-signed him to another two-way contract before the 2018-19 season. Restricted to only 45 days with the Lakers under his two-way contracts, Caruso played in a total of 62 games over those two years.

It wasn’t until the summer of 2019 that the Lakers finally signed him to a standard NBA contract worth $5.5 million over two years. And he’s become a key player off the Lakers bench, especially in the playoffs.

Despite not getting much of an early opportunity, Caruso continued to put in the work in anticipation of when his number would finally be called. He always was confident that it would come.

“It’s been the story of my career, no matter what level I’m at, the more time I have on the court, the better I’ve gotten,” Caruso told reporters after the Lakers eliminated the Denver Nuggets. “I’ve been waiting for an opportunity, I was two years on two-ways…finally I played well enough to get a contract, and over the course of the year it’s the same thing, anytime I can get out there on the court, I get better.”

Caruso’s stats may not jump off the page, he put up 5.5 points per game this season on only 41.2 percent shooting from the field, 33.3 percent from three-point range, 1.9 assists and 1.9 rebounds, but his impact has gone far beyond statistics.

His playoff numbers are up slightly at 6.8 points on 43.6 percent shooting to go along with 2.9 assists and 2.3 rebounds, but he’s become an invaluable member of the team’s postseason run. The defensive intensity and energy he brings to the court have been instrumental in playoff wins.

In this postseason alone, he’s seen himself matched up defensively with Damian Lillard, James Harden, Russell Westbrook, and one of the bubble’s breakout stars in Jamal Murray. Each time, he hasn’t backed down from the challenge and has even provided solid man to man defense on each of them.

“Looking and diving into the basketball aspect, series by series, just finding different ways that I know I can be effective, watching past games against opponents, just knowing their tendencies,” Caruso said on a recent media call. “The defense and the effort thing is something I’m always going to have. You can see that in the regular season when I might be more excited on a stop or defensive play on somebody than the rest of the team in game 45 or 50 in the season.”

While his main contributions have been his defense and his hustle, he’s found ways to be effective on the offensive end as well. While not shooting particularly well from three-point range percentage-wise in the playoffs at only 26.9 percent, he’s hit some timely ones during Laker runs to either pull closer to their opponent or to blow the game open.

He’s also been able to get the rim off drives and get himself to the free-throw line, and he’s made strong cuts off the ball to free himself up for easy layups. Playing with the second unit, he’s played a lot of off-ball with Rajon Rondo as the main facilitator, or with LeBron James as the only starter on the floor.

“For me, I think it’s about being aggressive. At any time I can put pressure on the paint whether it’s to get to the rim to finish or to draw fouls or make the defense collapse and get open shots for teammates, that’s really an added benefit for us to have multiple guys out on the court,” Caruso said.

“So whenever I’m out there with Rondo or with LeBron, to not have the sole focus be on one of them to create offense for everybody, it makes us a lot more balanced.”

The trust that Lakers head coach Frank Vogel and the rest of the team have in Caruso has been evident this whole postseason. Perhaps no bigger moment came for him than in Game 6 against the Nuggets in the Western Conference Finals when Vogel left him on the court to close out the game.

He’s also become one of the team’s vocal leaders on the court during gameplay, on the sidelines in the huddle and the locker room. On a team with a lot of strong personalities, Caruso’s ascendance as a locker room leader is something that just comes naturally for him. It’s something he’s done his entire basketball career.

“Being vocal has always been easy for me. Outside of this team, I’ve usually been one of the leaders on the team, one of the best players on my team growing up at different levels of basketball. Being vocal is pretty natural for me,” Caruso said.

“I got the trust of my teammates, they understand what I’m talking about. I say what I need to say and it doesn’t fall on deaf ears. I’m really competitive and if there’s something I think needs to be said, I’m going to do it. I leave no stone unturned to get the job done.”

Now in the NBA Finals, as the Lakers seek to win their first championship since 2010 and No. 17 overall, Caruso has reprised his role as a defensive irritant and glue guy who makes winning plays. For the team to win this series, they need to continue to get timely contributions from him.

And with each step of the way, he’s just soaking it all up and is thrilled to be able to have this opportunity alongside some of the NBA’s best.

“It’s a journey I’ve been on my whole life just to get to this point. It’s really cool, I don’t know how to state it other than that,” Caruso said. “It’s just super cool for me to be able to have this experience. To play meaningful minutes and play well, and be on the court with LeBron in big-time moments.”

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