Connect with us

NBA

Kevin Durant and Lessons Learned on the NBA’s Easy Road

Kevin Durant may be learning a lesson that LeBron James already taught us, writes Moke Hamilton.

Moke Hamilton

Published

on

It’s June 1, 2017.

There he stood.

Isolated against his muse, Kevin Durant looked LeBron James in the eyes as he dribbled. At center court, as Oracle Arena erupted into a frenzy, Durant knew that five years after James had robbed him of his glory, the only thing separating him from finally wrapping his long, slender fingers around the Larry O’Brien trophy were 78 seconds.

Durant attempted a crossover, but trembling with excitement, he nearly lost control of the ball. He regained it only momentarily before being stripped by LeBron. Still, with the Warriors ahead by 11 points, his final turnover of the game would ultimately become just a meaningless footnote in the throes of Durant’s to this point tragic history.

On the ensuing play, after a Kyrie Irving miss, with arms heavy as lead, Durant’s heart raced faster than Russell Westbrook on a breakaway.

As he crossed halfcourt, with tears streaming down his face, Durant wiped his eyes with his jersey before doubling over.

The game he’d given everything to had finally repaid him.

It took a tap on the back from Andre Iguodala to remind Durant that the game was still going on, and before he knew it, Stephen Curry’s final made three-pointer caused him to raise his arms to the heavens.

The confetti rained and the champagne showered. After winning his first NBA title, Durant would eventually make his way to the podium cradling the Bill Russell Finals MVP trophy.

Seemingly a tad nervous, he meekly asked a strange question.

“Can I sit this right here?”

After he’d received approval, Durant, the 2017 NBA Finals MVP, nodded appreciatively of the fact that he didn’t have to let his trophy out of his sight.

From that moment forth, he told anyone who’d listen his story.

From nothing, he’d come. A lack of self-confidence and uncertainty of his supremacy, Durant silently and begrudgingly existed in the shadows as an inlier. He watched Kobe Bryant and LeBron James get the adulation he’d longed for and grew weary of the shadows cast over him by Stephen Curry and even Russell Westbrook, his own teammate.

He eventually took his backpack, a pair of Nikes and the enormous chip on his shoulder to Oakland in search of validation and vindication. Now, on this day, 11 months later, he’d found it.

“It was 55 seconds left,” Durant said in 2017.

“I went over to half court and I bent down. I’m like, ’Is this really happening?’ And Draymond was like, ‘Keep playing to the end.’ Andre is like, ‘Keep playing, we have like 50 seconds left.’ And I’m like, ‘Bro, we’re about to win the title…’

“You can call us a super team, but it’s been a lot of super teams that hasn’t worked. We came together and we continued to just believe in each other. We sacrificed, and we’re champions now.”

His voice raised slightly as he finished his thought.

Champion.

It had a nice ring to it.

As Durant looked around the room at some familiar faces and many new ones, he probably thought that this was something he could get used to.

Just one year later, it’d seemed he had.

* * * * * *

History often repeats itself, but nothing is perfect, not even the basketball gods.

Game 3 of the 2018 NBA Finals was no exception.

The Warriors, despite struggles from Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson, were improbably leading the desperate Cleveland Cavaliers by three points.

As LeBron James darted into the paint with a minute remaining in a game his team had to find a way to win, Durant stood within an arm’s length of Kevin Love, who was helplessly relegated to floor-spacing duties on the right wing.

Durant watched James put his season in the hands of Tristan Thompson, and when Thompson failed to deliver in the biggest moment, Durant again found the ball in his hands. Again, he was staring James in the eyes. Tired and badly beaten, though, the 33-year-old king was only a remnant of the superhero we’d grown accustomed to witnessing.

As Durant instructed his teammates to clear out and allow the duo to go one-on-one, he got the satisfaction of knowing that LeBron wanted no part of him.

Rodney Hood did James a favor and switched onto Durant. Without hesitation, Durant took one dribble to his left and drilled a three-pointer from downtown Cleveland.

Those final three points weren’t the last ones scored in Game 3, but they were the last ones that mattered.

As Durant clinched Game 3 for his Warriors, he was apathetic. He exhaled and began to slowly walk toward his bench as Stephen Curry and Draymond Green danced around him like a totem pole.

One game later, after completing the sweep, there were no tears of joy. As Durant accepted the Bill Russell Finals MVP trophy yet again, he slapped hands with his teammates, but his body language was unmistakable.

Been there, done that.

Somewhere from that time to his visit to the podium shortly thereafter, Durant must have lost track of his MVP trophy. Unlike the year prior, when he carried it around like a loaf of fresh baked bread, this time, he discarded it like an empty eggshell.

As the two-time MVP took his seat, Draymond Green retrieved the trophy and plopped it on the table in front of him. He looked at it, smiled, and used his left hand to slide it away.

“When you experience something for the first time and you do it again, those emotions aren’t going to be there as they were the first time,” Durant said during his press conference.

He touched on a range of topics before providing an answer that was truly insightful.

“Two years in a row MVP. How are you feeling about that?”

“It feels great to go out there and win a championship with these guys,” Durant said.

“I’m just so happy for Nick Young, Quinn Cook, their first championships. It feels great that we can go out there and give an experience to guys that haven’t been here before, just like they did to me last year…

“It feels great that we can do that. Just the brotherhood that we have in that locker room, and just the family atmosphere that we take on the road, not just the players, but support staff and everybody in the organization…

“It feels good to kind of win it for them.”

In that moment, somewhat contrary to what has been said about Durant, he sounded nothing like a player who felt like he needed to win for himself.

Not anymore, anyway.

“Former players and players now that got a lot to say about what I did, they know how I play,” Durant said defiantly.

“They know exactly what I bring. They know. They know. They understand when they get on the court with me or they check up with me. They know what it is.”

Kevin Durant, two-time champion, looked and sounded every bit like someone who had exorcised his demons. On this journey, though, he’s probably realized that there’s a difference—both in public perception and personal satisfaction—in winning with the deck stacked in your favor versus winning in spite of insurmountable odds.

* * * * * *

Six years ago, in Miami, LeBron James’ eyes lit up as he himself cradled the Larry O’Brien trophy for the first time.

Coincidentally, it was Kevin Durant who he toppled.

Durant sat in the locker room of the American Airlines Arena and sobbed with James Harden and Russell Westbrook.

James, on top of the world, carried his Finals MVP trophy around with him, just like Durant would five years later.

Like a child who’d just met his new puppy for the first time, in Miami, it was Christmas morning. James hugged everyone he knew as he made his way to the podium, and on the way back to the locker room, as he struggled with carrying the heavy hardware, he was asked if he needed a hand.

“Nope, I got it,” James said.

He’d carried all the weight for all these years. It was only fitting he carried the fruit.

The next year, when his Miami Heat defeated the San Antonio Spurs to capture back-to-back NBA Championships, James had grown up. No longer an excited child cradling his newfound puppy, he seemed more interested in simply protecting his turf.

Four years later, though, we saw a completely different scene.

With Kyrie Irving by his side, as James became the first Finals MVP to lead his team back from a 3-1 series deficit against these same Warriors, James collapsed to floor at Oracle Arena and cried uncontrollably.

He embraced Irving and told him he loved him and kept repeating aloud that they’d done it, almost as if he himself couldn’t believe that they had.

“I set out a goal, two years when I came back, to bring a championship to this city,” James said in his teary-filled monologue.

“I gave everything that I had. I put my heart, my blood, my sweat, my tears into this game…

“Against all odds.”

When LeBron met with the media after that Game 7, he was asked whether that championship meant more to him than those won in Miami.

“Absolutely,” he said without hesitation.

“Just knowing what our city has been through, northeast Ohio has been through… Our fans, they ride or die, no matter what’s been going on, no matter the Browns, the Indians, the Cavs and so on, and all other sports teams. They continue to support us. And for us to be able to end this, end this drought, our fans deserve it. They deserve it.

“It was for them.”

It took a circuitous journey for LeBron to learn an important lesson: true victory isn’t just a destination that one needs to get to, it’s every bit as much about the route one takes and the terrain one traverses.

On more than one occasion, Durant admitted James to be the only player he’s met that he considered his peer. The two continue to have a relationship that is every bit as friendly and unique as it is competitive and professionally hostile.

Of all NBA players, James is the only one who faced the level of scrutiny he has and mostly lived to fulfill the gargantuan expectations had of him. He can relate to Durant in ways nobody else can, so don’t be surprised if one day, off on the side, Durant asks him if he’d trade the two championships he won for Miami for the one he won for Cleveland.

Despite what James may say publicly, anyone who knows him knows the truth.

* * * * * *

With two championship rings in tow, Durant trails LeBron in the medal count, and since great players measure themselves by hardware, Durant knows he’ll need at least two more rings to be the rightful successor to the king’s throne.

At that point, should the Warriors have achieved their four titles and have done it anywhere nearly as dominantly as they have these past two seasons—they’ve gone 32-6 in the playoffs—his competitive itch may need to be scratched.

No, the Warriors didn’t ruin the NBA, but they did ruin its competitive balance. And while that might be good for ratings, it’s not good for much else, and certainly not for what true greats need more than anything else—real competition.

To a competitor, succeeding in the face of daunting odds is what oxygen is to fire. It’s necessary fuel. And although there’s no shame in succeeding with the deck stacked in your favor, there’s similarly no joy.

Sure, Durant passed the exam. It just happened to be an open-book test to which he had the answers.

When he spoke of the likes of Nick Young and Quinn Cook—those who hadn’t yet been to the mountaintop—one couldn’t help but to wonder whether he thought of those left behind in Oklahoma City.

We now know for sure that LeBron was thinking about those in Cleveland.

Sure, Kevin Durant may have nothing left to prove, but strangely, something about his second championship seemed off.

Deep down inside, he realized that while there are many routes to success, the easiest isn’t necessarily the most fulfilling.

The next time Durant finds himself isolated with LeBron James, hopefully, it’ll be behind closed doors.

And then, without question, James will reveal to him that this is the greatest lesson he’s ever learned.

Advertisement




Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

NBA

NBA Daily: Buyers Or Sellers – Southwest Division

Ben Nadeau continues Basketball Insiders’ “Buyers or Sellers” series with a break down of the Southwest Division.

Ben Nadeau

Published

on

Today is the day! Dec. 15. is finally here.

There are still a few weeks until Christmas, but this particular date marks another major holiday in NBA circles. As of 12:01 EST, players that signed new contracts in the offseason are eligible to be traded at long last. Although we won’t see a flurry of moves by any means, the old rumor mill should be up and running in no time. To commemorate the yearly occasion, Basketball Insiders dusted off the timeless Buyers or Sellers series and this entry will bring the ride to the ever-reliable Southwest Division.

For more trade chatter: Steve Kyler on the league-wide landscape, Spencer Davis covered the Central Division, David Yapkowitz broke down the Northwest, Drew Maresca tallied the Atlantic and Shane Rhodes grabbed the Southeast. With plenty of basketball behind us already, it’s time to take stock within the NBA’s most exciting division.

Spoiler alert: They’re all in it to win it, as always.

Dallas Mavericks

Through nearly 30 games, the Mavericks are right where they hoped to be — right in the thick of things. Before the season began, many wrote off Dallas — not because of their overall roster skill, but simply because the stingy Western Conference is no easy beast to conquer. Of course, they’re far from safe and a losing streak can spell trouble for any franchise, but the Mavericks have the correct balance of young assets and veteran leadership to make these good times last. Dirk Nowitzki made his long-awaited season debut on Thursday night against Phoenix, veterans like DeAndre Jordan, Harrison Barnes and Wesley Matthews have kept the ship steady and then there’s Luka Dončić, the rookie that’s set the league on fire.

Flanked by an experience-heavy bench, the Mavericks have exceeded expectations thus far and clearly won’t be sellers headed into trade season. Although, beyond that, it’s hard to envision Dallas finding a true way to considerably upgrade. Matthews’ expiring contract worth $18 million is intriguing, but his 39 percent mark from three-point range has been invaluable. Same, basically, with Jordan’s looming, consistent presence in the paint. And it’s hard to believe that many teams would bite on paying Barnes and his deal worth $25 million in 2019-20. Dončić and Nowitzki aren’t going anywhere either — duh — so that leaves Dennis Smith Jr. as perhaps the Mavericks’ most expendable piece right now.

Smith Jr. is averaging 13 points and 4 assists, a slight decline on his rookie season numbers, but the Mavericks would be wise to stick with the 21-year-old that went No. 9 overall so recently. If Dallas is serious about making a postseason push — and they should be — look for them to make a minor, bench-fortifying move between now and February.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Ryan Broekhoff, Devin Harris, DeAndre Jordan, Salah Mejri, Dirk Nowitzki

Houston Rockets

It’s begun to feel like beating a dead horse, but the Rockets are certainly in trouble.

In the crowded conference, Houston has done just enough not to be completely buried and forgotten about. Still, it’s also difficult to find an easy path back into this season as the legitimate contenders they once were. It’s well-documented by now, but the losses of Trevor Ariza and Luc Mbah a Moute loom large and their replacements — including the already-departed Carmelo Anthony — have failed to replicate their contributions. The Rockets balked at making a panic splash for Jimmy Butler and now they’re just hoping to slowly figure things out. Salary cap complications may have caused the offseason exodus, but the Rockets have lost their bite and defensive identity from a massively successful 2017-18 campaign.

As expected, James Harden, Chris Paul and Clint Capela have been remarkably robust again, but their depth takes a hard nose-dive from there. With so much money already committed to the core, Houston has no choice but to be buyers moving forward. Recent rumors have linked the franchise to Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, a useful defender and scorer who is, most importantly, obtainable. Badly in a need for a wing, Caldwell-Pope and his expiring contract worth $12 million would be a solid fit both rotationally and financially for the Rockets. Outside of that, Houston could shift around the likes of P.J. Tucker, Gerald Green, Marquese Chriss and Michael Carter-Williams, but would likely need to attach some picks in order to actually upgrade in a considerable way.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Michael Carter-Williams, James Ennis, Gerald Green; Jan. 15: Clint Capela, Chris Paul

Memphis Grizzlies

Sixth place! Memphis basketball is back, baby!

Just when we all thought the Grizzlies might be finally, officially dead, they go and rope us right back in. Helmed by head coach J.B. Bickerstaff, the 16-12 surprise squad is squarely involved in the postseason race. In fact, as of posting, the Grizzlies simultaneously lead the Southwest Division and only merely outpace the aforementioned disappointing, 13th-place Rockets by two games in the loss column. On the other hand, Memphis is just three behind Denver and Golden State for that elusive top spot, so, yes, the Grizzlies should be buyers in no uncertain terms.

(In fact, they nearly acquired Kelly Oubre Jr. earlier this morning…)

The early returns on recent additions like Kyle Anderson, Garrett Temple and Omri Casspi are promising, but there’s still a discernable gap between Memphis and the perennial powers that oppose them. Furthermore, they probably lack the type of big offer it’ll take to acquire somebody like Bradley Beal, but that doesn’t mean they’re totally limited here either.

J.R. Smith and Courtney Lee could be intriguing options for a roster that badly needs more shooting from deep. If Memphis wants to roll the dice, the Hawks’ Kent Bazemore — who is owed $19.2 million in 2019-20 — would be a culturally strong fit for the on-court brand as well. Ultimately, there are targets here for the taking if they’re willing to move on from JaMychel Green following the fast emergence of rookie phenom Jaren Jackson Jr. Green, 28, will be an unrestricted free agent in July and might be an enticing prospect for any franchise looking to clear up a chunk of cap space.

Assuming that Marc Gasol and Mike Conley Jr. are both invested for the long haul, the Grizzlies will remain firmly in the win-now column. Now, if only they could find a taker for that Chandler Parsons contract…

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Kyle Anderson, Omri Casspi, Shelvin Mack

New Orleans Pelicans

The Pelicans have Anthony Davis, so their designation should be awfully clear: Buyers.

It’s all about Davis, obviously, and the future Hall of Famer is eligible for a supermax contract in the 2019 offseason. If the Pelicans want to keep their once-in-a-generation star, there’s no time like the present to prove your undying commitment. Naturally, that’s why the Pelicans are one of the trade market’s most active teams right now, according to Brian Windhorst of ESPN. Similarly to Memphis, New Orleans lacks the high-ceiling prospect or hefty expiring contract that a significant upgrade in this scenario would entail. However, given that Pelicans must do whatever it takes to appease Davis, their trove of untouched draft picks should be available this winter.

Julius Randle has proven to be a quality signing, while Elfrid Payton was contributing nicely prior to fracturing his finger in November. Nikola Mirotic, E’Twaun Moore and Davis have all missed a sampling of games as well, leading the Pelicans to some unpredictable performances. Attempting to tread water out west is a dangerous game, so New Orleans may feel compelled to jump in the deep end sooner rather than later. Whether it’s small trade or a blockbuster effort, keeping Davis happy is one of the NBA’s most intriguing narratives as the superstar quickly hurdles toward potential free agency in 2020.

Although they’ve been marred by lingering injuries, this Pelicans team is clearly talented — but can they afford to wait much longer without adding reinforcements?

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Ian Clark, Jahlil Okafor, Elfrid Payton, Julius Randle, Kenrich Williams

San Antonio Spurs

This is a Gregg Popovich-led franchise still — so the Spurs, who haven’t missed the postseason since 1996-97, aren’t about to sell their assets and tank out anytime soon.

Sure, it’s been slow-going at times for an injury-riddled roster that’s now deep into their first full season with Kawhi Leonard at the helm. Granted, the breakup was indeed messy — but adjusting an entire scheme to a different superstar is not always an easy task. To his credit, DeMar DeRozan is soaring in San Antonio, averaging a career-high in both rebounds and assists through the first 29 games. Beyond that, Manu Ginobili retired, Tony Parker signed in Charlotte and Kyle Anderson left in free agency — all of sudden, everything had changed.

Toss in the brutal injuries to Lonnie Walker, Dejounte Murray and Pau Gasol, it’s easy to see why the Spurs have struggled out of the gate.

Since long-time wing Danny Green was part of the DeRozan-Leonard swap in July, the Spurs have sorely missed a defensive contributor at that spot. The just-moved Ariza would have been a flawless fit for Popovich and the Spurs, but there are plenty of veterans on the market for them snap to up if they’re willing. There’s a question of whether or not a healthy San Antonio team is a contender anyway — but as long as that legendary head coach is still in charge, they’ll be competing until the very end.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Marco Belinelli, Dante Cunningham, Rudy Gay, Quincy Pondexter; Jan. 15: Davis Bertans, Bryn Forbes

It’s business as usual in the Southwest Division and that won’t be changing in the near future. Between the hungry superstars and talented head coaches, selling at the trade deadline seems like a near impossibility. Although it’s still early, all five teams are entrenched in both the division and postseason battle, so get used to seeing them slug it out until April. The volatile Western Conference means that four of them could easily miss out — but the smart money says that it’ll be a close race until the very end.

Davis, Popovich, Dončić, Conley and the reigning conference runner-ups — how could you bet against any of them? For now, the best we can do is keep an eye on this space and watch the stars shine.

Continue Reading

NBA

NBA Daily: Buyers Or Sellers – Southeast Division

Shane Rhodes continues Basketball Insiders’ “Buyers or Sellers” series with a break down of the Southeast Division.

Shane Rhodes

Published

on

The trade market has been an active one this season and, on December 15, trade chatter should only increase; players that signed contracts prior to September 15 will become eligible to be traded.

While some big names have already been moved — Jimmy Bulter, Kyle Korver, George Hill, etc. — anything could happen between now and the February Trade Deadline. One team could go on a hot streak and look to add talent, while another could watch their season nose dive and look to acquire assets to either retool or rebuild. But which teams should look to buy and which should look to sell?

Basketball Insiders has started a “Buyers and Sellers” series to find out just that. We’ve already looked at the Atlantic, Central and Northwest divisions, and today we will focus in on the Southeast.

So, which teams are poised to make a postseason run and which should look to strip down the roster?

Charlotte Hornets

The Charlotte Hornets are in a tough spot.

Kemba Walker has played at an MVP level this season and any team with that kind of talent should be able to grab a top-eight seed with ease in the weaker Eastern Conference. However, the Hornets aren’t exactly a powerhouse; while they sit atop the Southeast Divison and sixth in the conference, they do so with just a 14-13 record. Their roster is middling at best, and most in their position would look to retool for next season, if not start a complete teardown.

But they can’t exactly do that now.

The Hornets made a win now move this offseason when they brought Tony Parker aboard. If they decided to tear it down now, not only would it be a slap in the face to Parker, but to the fans and, most importantly, Walker as well. Walker is on the last year of his deal and will look to cash in next offseason. If Charlotte can’t win some games, they could hurt their chances of retaining that All-Star point guard.

So, what should the Hornets prioritize as trade season looms? Rebounding.

Charlotte is eighth in the NBA in points per game and, while their defense could use some work, they are good enough that it shouldn’t be their top priority. However, they have some serious rebounding issues; Cody Zeller is the Hornets leading rebounder with just 5.6 per game. As a team, they are 21st in the NBA with just 43.8 per game.

The Hornets have plenty of bigs on the roster — Zeller, Marvin Williams, Willy Hernangomez, Bismack Biyombo — but none of them are having a big impact on the glass. If the team has an opportunity to swap out one of the duds for an interior threat, they should take it while they can.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Tony Parker

Orlando Magic

Like the Hornets, the Orlando Magic are at best a middling roster that, as of now, is vying for a playoff spot. But, unlike the Hornets, they aren’t in a position where the need to win now.

The future in Orlando resides with Aaron Gordon, Jonathan Isaac and Mohamed Bamba, but they aren’t already to make an impact at the highest level. So, at 13-15, the Magic should go into asset collection mode and sell off some pieces while they still have value. Draft compensation should be the primary goal, but it wouldn’t be the worst if Orlando took a chance on some young could-be contributors.

Nikola Vucevic, an unrestricted free agent next season, has increased his value with a dominant season thus far and could return some premium assets. His departure would open up heavy minutes to be split amongst Isaac and Bamba, which could be a major boon to their development, and it would provide the Magic with some sort of return rather than losing him for nothing next offseason.

Evan Fournier is another piece that could be a major boost for a contender — the 26-year-old has averaged 14.9 points, 2.9 rebounds and 3.9 assists this season — and could probably be had for a reasonable return. With the Magic expected to find their home in the lottery in a forward-heavy draft, the absence of Fournier could open up immediate playing time for whomever they select.

D.J. Augustin, Terrance Ross and Jonathon Simmons are just a few of the other role players that could be had from the Magic roster.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Isaiah Briscoe

Miami HEAT

The Dwyane Wade farewell tour, thus far, has been a success. The same can’t be said for the Miami HEAT season.

After they made the postseason a year ago, the HEAT find themselves at just 11-16 on the year. And, with no major reinforcements on the way, things probably won’t get much better from here. That being said, they have some quality pieces they could move for future assets.

Goran Dragic could be a major addition for any team looking for point guard help. While the contract may be tough to stomach, Hassan Whiteside could be a major force inside if active and engaged on both ends. James Johnson, Dion Waiters and Kelly Olynyk could provide major depth for any team looking to make a playoff push.

Josh Richardson, Justise Winslow and Bam Adebayo are a solid core to build around and, while it may be sad to see the last season of Wade squandered, it would be best for the HEAT to focus on those three and build around them for the future. If they can add another young, impact guard to the mix — either via trade or the draft — that future could be a bright one.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Wayne Ellington, Udonis Haslem and Derrick Jones

Washington Wizards

The sky was falling for the Washington Wizards at the start of the season. Things haven’t improved much since, but they have perked up a bit.

The Wizards are in a No Man’s Land of sorts; the postseason is within reach — and they have the NBA talent to get there — but how far could they really go? John Wall hasn’t looked himself at times, but he and Bradley Beal are still one of the better one-two punches in the NBA. But, while the rest of the roster may do enough to get them to the postseason, it may not do enough to push much further.

So what should the Wizards do? It starts with Otto Porter Jr.

The Wizards signed Porter to a max-deal in 2017, and their return on investment hasn’t been great; Porter averaged 14.7 points, 6.4 rebounds and shot 44.1 percent from three in the first year of his new deal, but has seen the majority of his numbers — most importantly, his scoring numbers and shooting percentages — dip this season.

Porter has to prove to the Wizards that he is worth the money, and the Wizards have to push Porter to be the best player he can be. If one or the other can’t do their job, then a split may be best for both parties.

Beyond that, the Wizards have plenty of other problems to deal with. They rank just 27th in the NBA in three-point percentage and 28th in rebounding — that has to change if they want to compete. The sheer amount of money already tied into Wall, Beal and Porter will make any significant upgrades difficult, but the Wizards will have to try something; if they don’t, a roster reboot will be waiting for them.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Dwight Howard and Jeff Green

Atlanta Hawks

The Atlanta Hawks are bad. They know it, the league knows it. If anyone on their roster, outside the trio Trae Young, Taurean Prince and John Collins, isn’t able to be had for a future asset, they are doing this rebuilding thing wrong.

The Hawks should be hunting for draft picks, but looking for some depth on the wing wouldn’t be a bad idea, either. Vince Carter is 41 going on 1 million, Kent Bazemore should be on the move and Justin Anderson and DeAndre Bembry are lower-level rotation players at best. There are some solid pieces in place, but the Hawks have a long way to go before they are buyers again.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on Dec. 15: Vince Carter, Alex Len and Daniel Hamilton

Trade season is long, and there is plenty of time for things to go the other way for some of these teams. And this is only the Southeast; teams all over the NBA could see their fortunes reversed between now and February. Either way, an interesting few months lie ahead, and they could have a major impact on the NBA landscape come seasons end.

Be on the lookout for the rest of our “Buyers or Sellers” breakdowns as well.

Continue Reading

NBA

NBA Daily: Buyers Or Sellers – Atlantic Division

Drew Maresca continues Basketball Insiders’ “Buyers or Sellers” series with a break down of the Atlantic Division.

Drew Maresca

Published

on

While teams are technically allowed to trade prior to December 15, NBA trade season really heats up on that day. And with trade season comes lots of goodies like rumors to sort through, player activity on Twitter and other social media sites and – most importantly – the changes to rosters across the league.

December 15 is the line of demarcation because as of then, free agent signees from last offseason are eligible to be traded. This means teams that may have buyer’s remorse can move on from deals they regret and other teams that may have missed on a free agent target get a second chance to land their player.

The Atlantic Division features three teams in a full-on arms race – Boston, Philadelphia and Toronto – and two others preparing their rosters to make a run at free agents this coming offseason.

The Sixers already drew first blood with their trade of Robert Covington and Dario Saric for Jimmy Butler. Meanwhile, the Raptors are sitting pretty with the league’s best record through 30 games and the Celtics, at 7-3 in their last 10 games, seem to have figured out the rotational issues that have plagued them thus far.

We at Basketball Insiders began a new series examining each NBA team by division and identifying which teams should be looking to move or add salary as we quickly approach December 15. Let’s take a closer look at the teams in the Atlantic Division. 

Boston Celtics

The Celtics roster is still in a delicate state. They just recently began playing consistently good basketball. They have a gluttony of talent, but there is probably limited interest in moving any of their core pieces for anyone not named Anthony Davis – as evidenced by their apprehension to involve themselves in dealings with the Pacers for Paul George prior to last year or with the Timberwolves for Jimmy Butler prior to his trade to Philadelphia.

The one player that they should seriously consider moving, however, is Terry Rozier. Rozier is due for a raise. They could issue him the qualifying offer after the season and match the offer sheet he chooses to sign, but it is virtually an inevitability that someone will make him a lucrative offer – and one the Celtics would probably prefer to avoid paying due to luxury tax implications.

If the Celtics truly feel that Kyrie Irving is the long-term solution at point guard and that he will re-sign as he said he will, then they need to cash in Rozier. While his stock isn’t quite as high now as it was coming off of his play in the 2018 NBA Playoffs, he did nothing to hurt the perception of him. The Celtics could still probably pry some assets away from a team desperate for a point guard of the future. And considering the four first-round draft picks they control in 2019 and how onerous onboarding four rookies would be for a veteran team, the prudent move may be to package Rozier and picks for someone that fits better with the roster its timeline.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on December 15: Aron Baynes, Jabari Bird and Brad Wanamaker

Brooklyn Nets

The Nets are in prime position to be sellers as they try to scrape together as much cap space for the free agency gold rush of 2019 as possible. Gone are the days of taking on overpaid role players in exchange for draft picks and other assets – even though they look to be a fringe playoff team and would love to get their young stars some playoff experience.

They must fight that urge. And for now, the Nets will probably stand pat. I’m sure they would like to get out from the Allen Crabbe contract considering is effect on their cap space moving forward, but that’s a tough pill for any team to swallow without sending out additional assets.

Like the Celtics, the Nets have two quality point guards and should considering moving one. The Celtics situation is far more cut and dry, though. The Nets need to first identify who they hope to build around – D’Angelo Russell or Spencer Dinwiddie. Russell will cost more, but Dinwiddie is a bit more of a scoring point guard than a facilitator. Dinwiddie just signed an three-year, $34 million extension Thursday. While they could re-sign Russell and retain both guys, it would be prohibitive to their plans in free agency. And losing Russell for nothing would be a real missed opportunity to return future assets.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on December 15: Ed Davis, Treveon Graham and Shabazz Napier

New York Knicks

The Knicks plan to try their hand at shopping soon, too, but not yet. Now is actually prime time for the Knicks to be sellers. The team would obviously like to sign at least one superstar – if not more – this offseason. While they will likely have enough cap space to do so, part of their pitch will likely be the ability to sign a few contributors.

To make that a reality, the Knicks must trade either Courtney Lee or Tim Hardaway Jr. Hardaway has been more productive this season than ever before, but he is owed more money on a longer deal, so it’s more likely that Lee is the easier of the two to trade.

When healthy, Lee is still a productive and efficient wing who can still defend and who has shot at least .400 from three-point range in each of the last three seasons. He would be a welcome addition to virtually any contender.

Furthermore, the Knicks have at least one too many point guards. Moving on from or including either Trey Burke or Emmanuel Mudiay in a Courtney Lee trade would be ideal. While moving on from Burke or Mudiay doesn’t clear future cap space, they could make taking a gamble on Lee more appealing to a team like the Spurs or 76ers.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on December 15: Mario Hezonja, Luke Kornet and Noah Vonleh

Philadelphia 76ers

The 76ers just added Jimmy Butler to their roster in a blockbuster deal on November 11. They are 19-10 overall and 10-4 since adding Butler. They should be happy with their roster and should fight the urge to infuse it with more, new players.

I seriously doubt that the 76ers will make any other major deals. But don’t be surprised if Markelle Fultz’s name remains in trade rumors right up to the trade deadline. As recently as Thursday, Fultz was mentioned as a target of the Detroit Pistons by the Detroit Free Press. Both Fultz and the 76ers seem ready to move on. A Fultz trade seems likelier now than ever before.

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on December 15: Amir Johnson and J.J. Redick

Toronto Raptors

The Raptors’ major move came over the summer when they dealt DeMar DeRozan and netted Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. The team has played even better this season than they did last year when they were the number one seed in the Eastern Conference playoffs. What more do they need? They boast the best record in the league (23-7), they swept the defending champion Golden State Warriors in their season series (including a win Wednesday night sans Leonard) and they own the second-best margin of victory in basketball.

While crazier things have happened, don’t expect Toronto to make any trades. They do need more time together, though. They will continue to improve as they learn each other’s preferences and tendencies. How scary of a thought is that?

Players whose trade restrictions are lifted on December 15: Lorenzo Brown and Greg Monroe

The Atlantic Division is among the most interesting given the depth of top-tier talent. One move can swing the balance of power in the division – and the conference – considerably. It will be interesting to see if any of the division’s juggernauts make any major moves, or if either of the New York-area teams can either nab a star or clear more space.

Make sure to follow along here at Basketball Insiders with the rest of the divisions as well as any trade news and reactions as they happen.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

NBA Team Salaries

Advertisement

Insiders On Twitter

NBA On Twitter

Trending Now