Connect with us

NBA

NBA AM: James Jones Guarantees Chris Bosh Return

Chris Bosh’s former teammate, Cavs forward James Jones, is adamant the All-Star will return to action.

Lang Greene

Published

on

The Miami HEAT’s summer, in many ways, was a prelude to the future and an unexpected departure from the past. The team locked up future building blocks Hassan Whiteside and Tyler Johnson to new multi-year deals, but lost part of their past with future Hall of Fame guard Dwyane Wade bolting to Chicago in free agency. Just over two months later, nearing training camp, the team announced All-Star forward Chris Bosh failed a physical. A few days later, the franchise publicly admitted Bosh’s tenure with the organization is likely over.

Wade’s departure came down to perceived disrespect during contract negotiations, while Bosh’s tenure in Miami is up in the air due to a recurring medical condition. Bosh has had his last two seasons cut short around the All-Star break due to a blood clot diagnosis. According to multiple reports, the second blood clot diagnosis this past February led Miami team doctors to inform the forward his professional playing career was likely over. 

Cleveland Cavaliers forward James Jones played six seasons in Miami, from 2008 to 2014, and won two championships with the franchise alongside Bosh and Wade. The veteran was shocked by the latest developments in Miami – specifically that Bosh or Wade won’t be in a HEAT uniform this season.

Jones says he has talked with Bosh since the failed physical and is totally confident the 11-time All-Star will eventually be cleared to play the game he loves at a high level.

“Chris will play again,” Jones confidently told Basketball Insiders. “I’ve always said there’s something about that group in Miami. Every single guy down there, in a unique fashion, had overbearing, overwhelming desire to succeed. We did some special things down there namely because those guys (Wade and Bosh) willed their way to it.

“From a health perspective, I know [Chris] will do everything in his power and medicine these days is amazing. He’ll find a way to get back. No way will he allow the game to be taken away from him for a medical reason. But like always, he’s methodical, he’s very very patient and he’ll figure it out. We’re all pulling for him because this is a brotherhood. Not only because this is the NBA but by playing on a team like that, it’s a brotherhood, and you always want to see your brother’s dreams and legacies fulfilled.”

For now, optimism aside, Bosh is playing the waiting game. The veteran is under contract through 2019 and is owed $76 million – all of which is guaranteed. But Miami may be able to generate some financial freedom from Bosh’s deal. With this coming February marking a full calendar year since the second blood clot diagnosis, the HEAT can begin to take steps in order to remove Bosh from the salary cap. Insurance would then cover a large amount of the remaining money owed on the deal. Bosh could then become a free agent and attempt to get medically cleared by another franchise. Of course, Bosh could become a free agent sooner if the veteran negotiates a buyout for significantly less money, which isn’t likely.

To his credit, Bosh has been reluctant to give life to any notion that his career may be over in a series of taped video interviews on uninterrupted.com.

“I want to tell Miami, everybody in Miami, this not how I planned it to be,” Bosh said in episode four of the taped video series. “They don’t want to hear Dwyane’s gone. They don’t want to hear, ‘Oh, yeah, Chris is never going to play for the Miami Heat again.’ I just feel for the fans. I wanted to give them more. I wanted to give them something better. Because they deserve better than what they’re getting right now.”

Lang Greene is a senior NBA writer for Basketball Insiders and has covered the NBA for the last 10 seasons

Advertisement




Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

NBA

NBA Daily: Trade Targets – Southwest Division

The Southwest Division offers many intriguing options heading toward the annual trade deadline, Ben Nadeau writes, but how the chips fall is still anybody’s best guess.

Ben Nadeau

Published

on

The NBA landscape is oddly unfamiliar at this point in the season.

The Milwaukee Bucks are ruthlessly destroying everything in sight, the Golden State Warriors are headed toward a top-five draft pick in June and the New York Knicks are struggling to keep their heads afloat after a mid-season coaching change. OK, fine, that last one might ground us in reality, honestly — but things are looking up, at long last!

And yet, that one constant looms large: Feb. 6 and the annual trade deadline. Buyers, sellers — or wherever your favorite franchise might be — now is the time to push all-in, press the eject button or purchase a super-rare opal from a sketchy diamond salesman that may or may not give a player improved basketballing prowesses.

But if such an uncut gem is unavailable to front offices across the league, then they could do worse than to move for these Southwest Division-based players ahead of next month’s all-important deadline.

The Soft Resetters

Courtney Lee — $12,759,670
Solomon Hill — $12,758,781
E’Twaun Moore — $8,664,928
Marco Belinelli — $5,846,154

All four veterans total nearly 40 combined NBA seasons, offering experience, shot-making abilities and locker room leadership. Further, to some, they could represent cap relief. If a team is a deadline seller — the aforementioned Knicks, Cleveland Cavaliers or Detroit Pistons, for example — then these contract-ready players could help them tread water, shed longer deals or gain draft pick collateral. So for the Marcus Morris, Kevin Love and Andre Drummond-type contributors on the market, they won’t come without some deal-matching gymnastics — that’s where players like Lee, Hill and Moore can come in handy, too.

Hell, it’s also why the Houston Rockets got in trouble earlier this year for giving Nene a two-year deal worth $20 million in bonuses, thus making the long-time man the ideal trade fodder. Instead, the NBA voided the deal, ruling that any trade with the Brazilian would only be worth $2.6 in outgoing salary. The Rockets, in salary cap hell, would’ve loved to use Nene in a mid-season deal — perhaps for a name further down on this list, Andre Iguodala — but their creative deal-making was ultimately stymied.

Elsewhere, Moore, 30, has started 29 games for the New Orleans Pelicans in 2019-20 — at a steady 10.2 points per contest, nonetheless — but with Zion Williamson set to return next week and a full youth movement underway, he’s expendable. Better, he’s affordable for those looking for a perimeter punch (39.1 percent from three-point range) or a more cap space in the summertime.

Lee, on the other hand, has struggled to find time in a backcourt led by Luke Doncic. With he has a massively-expiring deal and a fantastic reputation behind-the-scenes, it’s not hard to imagine Lee moving elsewhere in the next 20 days as the Mavericks try to bolster their postseason chances.

Belinelli, 33, has been less effective in his older age, but boasts 65 career postseason games and a low-risk contract. Should the San Antonio Spurs pull the plug — head coach Gregg Popovich likely feels strongly otherwise — then Belinelli and others could be intriguing trade targets.

As for Hill, who has labored to stay healthy in recent seasons, he has another bloated expiring deal — although he’ll likely be most valuable to Memphis as freed up cap space come June.

The Calculated Risks

Andre Iguodala — $17,185,185
Jae Crowder — $7,815,533

The time has finally come: Free Andre Iguodala, you cowards!

Since the former NBA Finals MVP was dealt to the Grizzlies last summer, he’s been stuck in the mud. In an old fashioned standoff, Iguodala hasn’t appeared yet for the rebuilding franchise, while Memphis hasn’t budged from their first-round-pick-or-no-deal mindset from the offseason. Will they budge? Which teams will blink first?

The Los Angeles Lakers, always in need of more playoff-poised athletes to put next to LeBron James, might be willing. Houston, still in luxury cap hell, probably can’t finagle adding $17 million in cap space without obliterating its already-teetering-off-the-edge-of-the-abyss built roster.

Last time Iguodala was featured for the Warriors, the 35-year-old averaged just 5.7 points and 3.7 rebounds, but his defensive abilities and postseason record speaks for itself. The expectation is that Iguodala will be moved — but to whom and for how much? Well, that’s the six-month-old question on everybody’s mind, even today.

Iguodala, of note, will be an unrestricted free agent come June.

Crowder, 29, is on his fifth team since 2012 but, by and large, he’s impressed at every stop thus far. In 2019-20, the veteran standout has started all 38 games for Memphis, tallying 10.4 points and 6.1 rebounds per contest on a paltry (and expiring) $7.8 million dollar deal. Should the Grizzlies clear the deck, Iguodala included, Crowder has 50 games of postseason experience and won’t come with an outrageous price tag — both in regards to outgoing cost or future commitments.

The Leap Of Faiths

DeMar DeRozan — $27,739,975
Jrue Holiday — $26,131,111

This would be the all-in push. The all-or-nothing swing. The so-called leap of faith. Two stars in two different places in their careers — both equally excellent trade candidates for different reasons.

DeRozan, 30, is still chugging along as the leader of San Antonio, and he’ll likely finish with an average over 20 points per game for the seventh consecutive season. Healthy as they come, the high-flyer has played in 72-plus games during every campaign since 2014-15 — and he still knows how to enact a healthy dose of revenge, too. DeRozan won’t be a cheap option for many franchises, but might he be the final missing piece somewhere?

Such a move, naturally, would have to come with Popovich’s blessing and acceptance that the Spurs aren’t postseason-bound for the first time since 1997. At 17-22, San Antonio currently ranks 9th in a stingy Western Conference with five teams within three games of them as of Jan. 16. Betting against Popovich is a sin, but those odds, for the first time in a long time, aren’t looking fantastic for the perennial stalwarts.

Should the Spurs look to jumpstart a mini-rebuild — Dejounte Murray, Derrick White, Lonnie Walker and Keldon Johnson in tow — then there will certainly be suitors for DeRozan.

As for Holiday, he’s the division’s big-ticket item — if he’s still available, of course. Last the world had heard, the Pelicans had retreated from the offseason position of an unmovable Holiday, the new leader and cornerstone post-Anthony Davis. And yet, the Pelicans are one of those teams within breathing distance of the Spurs and a postseason trip for their budding core, so moving Holiday may not behoove them anymore.

Given Williamson’s assumed presence in the season’s second half, Brandon Ingram’s rise to stardom and Lonzo Ball’s newfound settledness, Holiday might be best served to stay put. Still, David Griffin, New Orleans’ executive vice president of basketball operations, is no stranger to the wheelin’ and dealin’ nature of February, and everybody has a price.

Holiday — 19.6 points, 6.5 assists and 1.7 steals per game, plus a back-to-back member on an All-Defensive Team — would elevate any roster in the league. If the 10-year veteran is, in fact, on the table, Griffin has likely been fielding offers for quite some time already. Should Williamson’s introduction to the rotation go seamlessly and the Pelicans firmly cement themselves as postseason contenders, however, then Holiday will be the perfect player to get them there.

With less than a month to go before the NBA’s trade deadline, the proceedings will only get wilder from here. While the entirety of the Southwest Division is still involved in a hectic playoff chase, far too much could change over the remaining weeks. Who will push all-in? Who will pull back? Are the Spurs going to concede their historic streak of postseason appearances? And how will the Pelicans look with Williamson in the fold?

These are questions without answers at this point.

In another month, we’ll have seen the future and then some — but which way it falls now is still anybody’s best guess.

Continue Reading

NBA

NBA Daily: RJ Barrett Calming Down, Playing With Poise

Jordan Hicks recently caught up with RJ Barrett near the end of a grueling road trip for the New York Knicks, discussing poise, confidence and dealing with injury.

Jordan Hicks

Published

on

The New York Knicks have struggled out of the gate, again. In fact, they haven’t had a season in the last five-plus years that you’d consider commendable. If there was even more salt to rub in the wound, the Knicks haven’t reached the Eastern Conference Finals since the 1999-00 season.

It’s safe to say there have been much, much better days in Madison Square Garden — but fortunately for Knicks fans, they finally have something to look forward to.

RJ Barrett – a product of Duke University – was selected with the third overall pick in the 2019 NBA Draft. After averaging 22.6 points, 7.6 rebounds and 4.3 assists per game in college, Barrett would have been the hottest commodity had he not played side-by-side with Zion Williamson, one of the most captivating prospects in the last 20 years.

Highly-touted coming out of college, Barrett was ranked as one of the top options from all major publications. And those rankings weren’t simply a guaranteed-star-is-born type deal – but the key intangibles have always been there. The New York-savior has a solid frame, smooth shooting stroke and the ability to get to the basket. He’s lengthy at 6-foot-7 and, combined with his agile demeanor, it allows him to comfortably create his own shot on offense.

Barrett hasn’t consistently shown Rookie of the Year-worthy flashes this season, but much of that can’t be placed solely on his shoulders.

So far, he’s tallied a respectable 14.1 points per game but doing so on an effective field goal percentage of just 43.5 percent. Those shooting percentages were a tad higher in college, however, it’s a facet of his game that he’ll strive to improve upon so that he can live up to the expectations of the Knicks’ franchise.

As he continues to develop his game and become more comfortable with the pace of the NBA, there’s little doubt his shooting will improve. At 31 minutes per game, Barrett is proving durable and capable, he just needs to see the ball go in the bucket more often and build up confidence.

Recently, New York was wrapping up a brutal road trip in which they finished against the Los Angeles Clippers, Los Angeles Lakers, then a back-to-back against the Utah Jazz. Still, despite the trials and tribulations, Barrett is taking things as they come.

“[I learned] just how to play hard no matter what,” Barrett told Basketball Insiders. “We are in the mountains, can’t breathe, still gotta play hard. It doesn’t matter.”

And that effort definitely showed.

Against Utah, the Knicks were without Julius Randle and Marcus Morris, their top-two scorers. Rather than simply fold, Barrett toughed out 10 points and two rebounds, despite feeling tired from the previous night’s game.

With the way the Jazz have been playing, facing the struggling Knicks on a back-to-back was almost a guaranteed win, but Barrett still learned a lot from his opponent.

“Experience is really an advantage, a team that has been together for that long you can tell,” Barrett said. “They know where each other [is], they’re knocking down shots, cheering for each other.

“A team like that, you hope one day we could get something like that too.”

The Knicks’ latest retool is still in its infancy stages, but with a few more draft picks and signings — added to a suddenly-budding core of contributors and expectations will rise quickly. But, until then, Barrett can only take his lumps, push to grow and adapt to the much more challenging NBA landscape, both on the court and on the road.

“I be chilling, to be honest, I’ve kind of learned that, you know, the game is just going to be the way it is and you can’t force it or you can’t get too down, can’t get too high,” Barrett told Basketball Insiders.

“Stay even-keeled every game. I’ve been more poised, more calm — it’s been working out a little better for me.”

From there, the conversation turned toward his former college teammate and close friend, Zion Williamson. When asked about how he feels about Williamson’s injury situation, he offered some sterling advice.

“I hate seeing him hurt. I hate not seeing him be able to play the game he loves, but at the same time, I think, we are 19, so he has a long career ahead of him,” Barrett said. “At this point I really just want him to continue to get better and get healthy and not try and rush back but, just come back when he’s ready.”

Wise words from someone who is only, as he said, 19 years of age. Together, although now apart, both have so much room to grow professionally. Even better, the former allies have used each other as a springboard half a coastline away.

“We keep in touch from time to time, picking each other‘s brains a little bit,” Barrett continued. “The one thing I like is that he’s happy, he doesn’t get too down on himself, he knows he has a long career ahead of himself, just gotta get healthy.”

Barrett mentioned the season is almost halfway over and, luckily for the Knicks, he’s been playing with more and more confidence. Preparation is key in the NBA, obviously, and the sooner players like Barrett can evolve, both mentally and physically, the better off his career will be.

“Just being more poised,” Barrett reiterated to Basketball Insiders about his new-found confidence. “[Knowing] how the defenses are going to play me so I’m just trying to figure out how to play within that.”

Needless to say, the Knicks have a slog ahead of them before they can rejoin the playoff conversation. Still, Barrett, prospect and skill-set wise, is about as good of a start as they come. Of course, he’s young and extremely raw in some categories — but he certainly doesn’t lack confidence and he has plenty of attributes necessary to be a star in the league.

When asked what needs to be done for the Knicks to get back on the right track, Barrett quickly responded, “Go home, feel good again, regroup, get back to it.”

With Barrett continuing to improve by the day, New York, finally, might have found the leading hands they so desperately need.

Continue Reading

NBA

NBA Daily: Welcomed Returns Loom Large in January

Injuries are a part of the game and this season has been no exception. Chad Smith looks at four teams who will get a nice boost with key players who are expected to return the floor this month.

Chad Smith

Published

on

With the February 6 trade deadline less than a month away, teams around the league are gauging their rosters and their positioning to figure out which direction they need to go. Some teams are solidly in the playoffs. Some are right on the bubble and others are a sinking ship.

Kyrie Irving finally returned to action this week after missing the last 26 games for the Brooklyn Nets. They had been up and down without him, but his presence was felt during his magnificent return. Being able to solidify a position of strength is important, and the Nets can attest to that even after Spencer Dinwiddie elevated his game. There are four other guys with looming returns this month who could ultimately shape the landscape of the playoff race.

Two of these players have already played in games this season. One is set to make his season debut after suffering a brutal injury last year. One of them is a young phenom ready to take the floor for the first time in his NBA career.

Getting these players back on the court will obviously give their respective teams a boost heading into the second half of the season. Some will jump right in but others will need time to get acclimated to new teammates and/or simply getting back into game shape. Regardless, these four players will have a big impact on their team’s success in the coming weeks.

Victor Oladipo, Indiana Pacers

The biggest mid-season addition to any team this year comes in Indiana with Victor Oladipo. The Pacers will finally have their All-Star guard back on the floor for their January 29 game against the Chicago Bulls. That will be just over one full calendar year from when he suffered a devastating quad injury.

Indiana has had an outstanding season to date, considering the overhaul of its roster in addition to the absence of its franchise player. They have a 25-15 record entering tonight’s matchup in Minnesota and are in position for a top-four seed in the Eastern Conference. Getting their dynamic weapon back will be a great boost, but integrating him may take time.

Expect the Pacers to ease Oladipo back into things. The process of getting him back to elite form has many complications, but the end result is what really matters. The ideal scenario for Indiana would be for Oladipo to return to his old self after the All-Star break as playoff positioning heats up. The Pacers are incredibly deep, and their trio of Oladipo, Malcolm Brogdon and Domantas Sabonis provides a promising future, should they stay healthy.

Zion Williamson, New Orleans Pelicans

The player generating the most buzz in this group resides in New Orleans. The fan base has been salivating at the opportunity to see their shiny new franchise player, Zion Williamson, and that moment is just days away. Everyone has been itching to see what Zion can do with the kind of talent that David Griffin has surrounded him with. Having guys like Jrue Holiday, Brandon Ingram and J.J. Redick shows that they intend to win games now.

Heading into tonight’s slate of action, the Pelicans are currently just 3.5 games out of the playoffs. Looking at how their season began and taking into consideration the fact that Zion hasn’t even played a game yet, it shows the type of makeup this team has. New Orleans could easily sell off parts and pieces as they build for the future, but that is not how they are approaching things.

There is still an unknown factor that plays into all of this, but should Zion stay healthy, this franchise is sitting in a great position. Adding a generational talent like Zion would lift the ceiling for any team. With Holiday’s sustained impact and Ingram’s breakout season, the Pelicans have an opportunity to really open some eyes in the second half of the season.

Karl-Anthony Towns, Minnesota Timberwolves

The playoffs may be out of the question right now, but if things continue going south and they are unable to recover, the Timberwolves might be feeling pressure to do something with their franchise superstar. Towns has missed 14 consecutive games and the team has been shaky (at best) without him. The good news is he will finally return to the floor tonight.

Andrew Wiggins started off the season on a tear but has truly plateaued over the last month. He did miss four games due to an illness, but the fact is he has suffered a major drop off as of late. Minnesota’s lineups are constantly changing and there doesn’t appear to be a lot of team chemistry at the moment. The Timberwolves are 15-24 (5th in the division) with a pair of games against the Pacers coming up.

Towns only missed a grand total of five games over the course of his first four seasons. His last game was December 18 as his left knee has been an issue. He will make his return tonight against Indiana, but he and the Wolves will be fighting an uphill battle for the rest of the season as they fight to make a run for the playoffs.

Mike Conley, Utah Jazz

Perhaps the most intriguing player in this group is veteran guard Mike Conley. Conley was expected to put the Jazz over the top after they acquired him last summer. He was supposed to be the difference-maker that would provide the experience and playmaking on offense that Utah has so sorely lacked over the years. Unexpectedly, Jordan Clarkson has been more of a spark to Utah’s offense than Conley.

Utah underwhelmed until Conley went down with a hamstring injury. Joe Ingles was struggling until he joined the starting lineup. Since then he has flourished, shooting 51 percent from three-point range. He has been a big part of Utah’s red hot run. Utah has won 15 of its last 16 games and its only loss was a three-point contest in Miami.

The Jazz have had the top-ranked offense during this stretch, and having Donovan Mitchell running the point along with Ingles has been a big reason why. Utah’s defense continues to be spectacular with Rudy Gobert anchoring the paint and protecting the rim. The real key here is the pairing of Rudy and Conley.

Conley has spent essentially his entire career playing with pick-and-pop bigs like Marc Gasol and Jaren Jackson Jr. Obviously Gobert does not have that skillset in his game, which complicates that pick-and-roll pairing. Figuring out how to use Conley once he returns will be vital to Utah’s success. Fortunately for Utah, Quin Snyder is more than capable for figuring out how to solve that puzzle.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Online Betting Site Betway
Advertisement
American Casino Guide
NJ Casino
NJ Casino

NBA Team Salaries

Advertisement

CloseUp360

Insiders On Twitter

NBA On Twitter

Trending Now