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NBA AM: Paul Battling for 76ers Roster Spot

Brandon Paul talked to Basketball Insiders about fighting for a roster spot at Philadelphia 76ers training camp.

Alex Kennedy

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During NBA Summer League, it’s no secret that many players like have a good time. After all, many of these prospects are in their late teens or early 20s and this is the first time that they get to experience anything close to the NBA lifestyle. In fact, for some it’s the only time.

In July, Las Vegas clubs are often full of very tall men wearing NBA warm-ups (players love donning these out in public since they’re extremely comfortable and, more importantly, let everyone know, “Oh, yeah, I play for the team. No big deal…”). Even for unknown players who are just on a Summer League contract, it’s relatively easy to get V.I.P. treatment and free drinks at a club by playing the NBA card. Many players know this and enjoy their time in Las Vegas.

However, some players want nothing to do with the extracurricular activities and treat Summer League like a business trip. Take Brandon Paul, for example. At 25 years old, he played in both the Orlando Summer League and Las Vegas Summer League this year, and he entered each event with one thing on his mind: Earn an NBA contract.

Paul isn’t a wide-eyed kid who’s excited to be around the NBA festivities. He has played Summer League in the past, suited up in the NBA D-League and even had stints in Russia and Spain. For Paul, Summer League wasn’t about enjoying the Las Vegas nightlife and partying. This was his chance to show NBA executives, coaches and scouts what he can do on the court, how he carries himself and why he belongs on an NBA roster this upcoming season.

Last July, Paul wasn’t able to participate in Summer League due to a shoulder injury, making him even hungrier to shine this time around. He did just that, and his professional approach paid off.

Paul played for the Charlotte Hornets in the Orlando Summer League. He scored double digit points in his first four games, including a 17-point, 11-rebound, two-assist, two-steal, two-block outing against the Oklahoma City Thunder that impressed NBA decision-makers. He was confident and comfortable on the floor, and he carried himself like a veteran. With Charlotte, he ultimately averaged 15.3 points, 7.3 rebounds, 1.5 assists and 1.5 steals while shooting 39.1 percent from three-point range.

The Philadelphia 76ers liked what they saw and asked Paul to join them in Las Vegas. Once he arrived and got acclimated, he did well and made his presence felt all over the court. He had an 18-point, six-steal, two-rebound outing against the Brooklyn Nets. In a win over the D-League Select Team, he had 20 points, six rebounds and two steals in 24 minutes (while shooting 4-6 from three-point range). Over the final three games of Summer League with Philadelphia, Paul averaged 16.3 points, 3.3 rebounds and three steals in 25 minutes per game.

Philadelphia was so impressed that they signed Paul to a partially guaranteed contract. He will attend training camp with the 76ers on a $543,471 salary (of which $155,000 is guaranteed). It’s worth noting that Paul’s $155,000 is more money than Robert Covington, Hollis Thompson, Jerami Grant, T.J. McConnell, Shawn Long and James Webb have guaranteed to them in their own partial or non-guaranteed deals.

At first glance, it may seem like Paul is a long shot to make Philadelphia’s roster. After all, they have 20 players coming to training camp. However, a closer look reveals that only 11 of those players have a fully guaranteed deal – meaning there’s an opportunity for Paul and others to make the team and even carve out a spot in the rotation. Given the Sixers’ needs in the backcourt, Paul felt confident betting on himself with this situation.

At the very least, Paul will earn a six-figure payday for his camp commitment, which then would likely lead to a spot with the Sixers’ D-League affiliate (the Delaware 87ers) and the possibility of a midseason call-up. Philly clearly likes Paul’s game, so this could be a smart route for him to take.

After thriving in Summer League, grinding in the D-League and going abroad to Russia and Spain, the 25-year-old guard is closer to achieving his NBA dream than ever before.

Basketball Insiders caught up with Paul to discuss his professional journey, why he chose to sign with the 76ers, what he can bring to Philadelphia’s roster, what he learned overseas and much more.

Alex Kennedy: What was the moment like when you officially signed with the 76ers? I know you’ve been working toward this for a long time, so how did it feel to achieve that goal?

Brandon Paul: “It was great, real humbling. Just thinking about all of the stuff I went through and all of the hard work I put in – especially this past summer – it was just a really exciting moment. It didn’t really come as a shock, but it was hard to put my thoughts in words when I got the call from my agent, Adam Pensack. It’s a great feeling.”

Kennedy: After your performance in Summer League, there were quite a few teams showing interest in you. How did you decide on the 76ers?

Paul: “I just felt like, all around, it was the best decision for me to come in and compete. They obviously have a young roster and I kind of bring in a little bit of maturity to that roster. Obviously, I’m relatively young as well. But around those guys, I’m kind of the older one and I’m a little more seasoned because I played overseas and in the D-League. I think I can bring a little bit of toughness and maturity to the roster.”

Kennedy: You played in Russia and Spain. How was your experience overseas, and how did it help you grow as a player and as a person?

Paul: “I mean, it’s definitely tough for a player coming out of college to go overseas and kind of build their resume over there. A lot of guys feel like if they don’t get the NBA right away then it might not happen; I just had the mindset of staying positive and staying the course. I definitely think it helped a lot. It helped shape me as a player and as a man. I learned a lot about myself because you have a lot of alone time when you’re living more secluded. Your family and friends aren’t around – it’s just you and your team – so I definitely think playing over there helped me grow a lot more.”

Kennedy: You had to overcome a number of obstacles to get to this point, from going undrafted to dealing with various injuries. How frustrating were those setbacks at the time, and does it make your current success even sweeter?

Paul: “It was definitely frustrating – especially because the injuries occurred at, I would say, some of the worst times. Every time I had another opportunity, a setback happened. Everyone’s got their story and I’m just kind of building mine up. I think the mental aspect was a lot tougher than it was physically. The rehab was brutal, but from a mental point, you’re kind of like, ‘Why does this keep happening? Is it going to happen again?’ I have a good circle around me, though, and I just stayed positive no matter what. People were asking me questions about it like, ‘How do you feel?’ and I just kept speaking positively. I think that helped me get to where I am right now.”

Kennedy: You’ve always had a chip on shoulder and used different slights as motivation. What’s your mindset entering training camp with the 76ers?

Paul: “I just have to go in and do what I do. I’ve always been a hard worker and I’ve always prided myself on working harder than others around me. It’s not about trying to prove anything – that’s just really all I know, that’s how I grew up, that’s what I was taught. I plan on competing every single day and just showing guys that it’s nothing personal, it’s just basketball. When I go out there, I got a team out there, but it’s not about making friends. It’s about playing and getting yourself better and getting the team better. I just want to go out there and just kill every day and prove myself. I want to prove to the staff that I deserve a roster spot.”

Kennedy: It seemed like that was your approach in Summer League too. You weren’t messing around out there – you were looking to take someone’s job.

Paul: “I unfortunately missed some opportunities the last couple summers because of injuries, so just getting the Summer League opportunity with Charlotte and then Philly was a great experience and I appreciate all of the help they gave me.

“I knew when I was going to Vegas that it was just another opportunity to open some eyes up. Every day you step on the court, it’s a job interview and I used it. I wanted to prove myself – regardless of who was in the stands – that I’m an NBA player who can do multiple things for a team.”

Kennedy: For fans in Philadelphia who may not know your game all that well, what will you bring to this 76ers team?

Paul: “They’ll get a guy who competes extremely hard and enjoys playing both ends of the floor. I understand that 90-93 percent of individuals in the league are role players and I’m ready to come in and just do whatever role I need to in order to help the team be successful and help myself be successful and continue to build my resume. I’ve been known as a scorer my whole career and I score the ball at a high level, but at the same time I’m capable of guarding multiple positions and I definitely use my length to my advantage. I think that as I continue this process I’ll be able to show more and more people my capabilities as an athlete and as a pro.”

Kennedy: It seems strange to say, but you’re one of older guys on this Sixers squad at 25 years old. With your maturity and experience playing professionally, are you looking to take on a leadership role and helping some of these young guys in Philly?

Paul: “I think that’s something that the staff enjoys about me – that I’m seasoned. I played all throughout college, I played overseas for a couple of seasons and I have experience in the D-League. Those experiences help me to bring that maturity and the professionalism to this stage as well so any chance I get, I try to talk to them and pass on a little bit of my knowledge. I see myself as the rookie and the vet. Yes, it’s my first year on this stage, but at the same time it’s my fourth professional year so I’m not new to this.”

Kennedy: Two Drake lyrics in one answer! That was awesome.

Paul: “I just realized that. Literally as I said it, I realized it (laughs).”

Kennedy: Since Summer League, what has your offseason training been like?

Paul: “I’ve been all over the place training – Las Vegas, Charlotte, Chicago and now Philadelphia. It’s really just been a lot of rigorous workouts. I’m working on my explosion, my quickness, my shot consistency and being able to finish with contact.”

For more of our one-on-one interviews, check out our recent conversations with Boston Celtics point guard Isaiah Thomas, Los Angeles Lakers guard D’Angelo Russell, Indiana Pacers guard Jeff Teague, Portland Trail Blazers guard C.J. McCollum, Orlando Magic forward Aaron Gordon, Oklahoma City Thunder guard Victor Oladipo, Atlanta Hawks swingman Kent Bazemore, New York Knicks guard Courtney Lee, Indiana Pacers center Myles Turner, Los Angeles Lakers forward Larry Nance Jr., Atlanta Hawks forward DeAndre Bembry, New Orleans Pelicans guard E’Twaun Moore and Sacramento Kings swingman Garrett Temple.

Alex Kennedy is the Managing Editor of Basketball Insiders and this is his 10th season covering the NBA. He is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

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NBA Daily: Poeltl Looking Forward To New Beginning With Spurs

Spencer Davies looks at the under-the-radar portion of the DeMar DeRozan-Kawhi Leonard trade and how Jakob Poeltl is already embracing the change.

Spencer Davies

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One month ago, a superstar-swapping trade between the Toronto Raptors and San Antonio Spurs was agreed upon.

The deal—which once again sparked a national debate about player loyalty—sent a reportedly disgruntled Kawhi Leonard to The North in exchange for Masai Ujiri’s franchise cornerstone, DeMar DeRozan.

Longtime Spur and veteran sharpshooter Danny Green was also moved to Toronto, while San Antonio acquired a protected future first-round draft pick and 22-year-old big man Jakob Poeltl.

Remember, Poeltl was an integral piece of a talented Raptor bench that produced a better net rating than their starters, as well as nearly all five-man groups in the league.

While the majority of pundits have gone back and forth about who won the trade, few have mentioned the ninth overall selection in the 2016 NBA Draft. Being involved in the transaction admittedly caught Poeltl “a little bit off guard.”

But entering his third year as a pro, the seven-foot Austrian is embracing the change and a brand new start with one of the most well-respected organizations in sports.

“That’s one of the things I’m most excited about, just the fact that this program has such a big history in developing players,” Poeltl told reporters in his first media appearance since the move. “I’m really excited for the process. Gonna be a lot of work, but I’m looking forward to it.”

From what he has heard from players who have been a part of the Spurs in the past and those who are currently there, it’s an unselfish group of people. They consider it a family environment.

“Everybody is just in it together,” Poeltl said. “From the very top to the very last guy on the bench or in the gym. It’s really like a great atmosphere, at least from what I’ve heard. So I’m looking forward to actually experiencing it myself.”

As soon as Poeltl got to San Antonio, he gazed at the championship banners hanging inside of the gym and quickly realized the expectations he’ll have to fulfill this season are a little higher than where he came from.

“It’s crazy, it’s different,” Poeltl said. “Obviously in Toronto, we didn’t have banners like that. Like we’re on a good way there, but this program here has some tradition to it. Over the last 20 years been a great basketball team. Obviously, you can tell by the championships and all the accomplishments.

“It’s a little bit of pressure, too. Like we’re trying to live up to that. There’s obviously a very high standard here, so we’ve gotta come in and put the work in and really show what we’ve got on the court as a team.”

Poeltl hasn’t wasted any time in immersing himself into the culture. In fact, he’s been working out at their practice facility since he arrived and feels like there’s a “natural chemistry” already with his new teammates.

In the weight room, Poeltl came across the forever face of the Spurs and future Hall-of-Fame forward, Tim Duncan. The conversation between them was short, sweet and casual. Basketball wasn’t brought up, as that will likely be saved for another time when the season approaches.

Duncan still sticks around and helps in practices from time-to-time, but he won’t be there every day. Somebody else who will be, however, is Pau Gasol, a fellow international center that Poeltl looks forward to learning from.

Though those two will be able to give veteran advice and priceless pointers, Poeltl’s most crucial teachings will come from the Spurs lead general—Gregg Popovich. Like with Duncan, on-court discussions were not the focus of their first interaction.

“We went to dinner,” Poeltl said. “We didn’t really talk too much basketball. It was more just like trying to get to know each other, like a first impression. I think there’s more than enough time for us to talk basketball and really learn what the Spurs are all about on the basketball court.

“But it was a really good conversation. Like I really enjoyed it. He’s a very down-to-earth type guy for if you think about what he’s accomplished in his career. He’s really cool.”

Once training camp comes and the dialogue does take a turn towards the hardwood, Poeltl will be all ears. As it stands now, Poeltl’s niche is the hustle guy. He picks up the scraps, corrals offensive rebounds and dives after loose balls, but don’t pigeonhole “role player” to his name. He plans on doing more in San Antonio.

“I take a lot of pride in that,” Poeltl said. “I think I do a lot of the little things out there—set good screens, be in the right places, making good reads off of my teammates and making plays for my teammates at the same time. Obviously like for me, that’s my role right now and I’m really enjoying that.

“I’m working on my game every single day in practice and I’m trying to develop more offensively and defensively so I can take on more responsibilities in the future.”

Moving on from the team that drafted you to another can be difficult. Luckily, Poeltl isn’t coming alone.

“Obviously it helps to have a familiar face like a guy that I’ve played with over the last three years,” Poeltl said of DeRozan. “Like I know how he plays basketball, he knows me. I think we play well together.”

In the two years they have played together, Poeltl has noticed DeRozan fine-tune his game. Although he is first and foremost a pure scorer, his all-around offense is getting better.

DeRozan’s reads on the opposition are crisper, as are the adjustments he makes due to that. He understands when to take games over and has involved his teammates more and more with each season.

It’s no surprise that the four-time All-Star guard is coming to the Spurs with a statement to make. All he’s done since being drafted is improve and devote himself to his second home in Toronto. He hasn’t uttered one favorable comment towards the front office he feels betrayed him.

Witnessing the kind of player DeRozan is when he’s pushed, Poeltl expects we’ll see a whole other side of him unleashed this year.

“It’s a little bit scary, to be honest,” Poeltl said. “Because I know what he can do when he has a chip on his shoulder, when he gets that extra motivation. I think he’s gonna be ready.”

Poeltl doesn’t have quite that big of a score to settle with the Raptors.

He’s just ready to give his all to an organization in a blue-collar town that matches the kind of work ethic he’s had since he started playing the game.

“That’s kinda how I’ve been for my whole basketball career,” Poeltl said. “Just get the work done.”

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NBA Daily: Can an Anthony-D’Antoni Marriage Work for Houston?

Shane Rhodes lays out how the Carmelo Anthony-Mike D’Antoni pairing could work this time around in Houston.

Shane Rhodes

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It’s official: Carmelo Anthony has joined the Houston Rockets after putting pen to paper on a contract. In doing so, Anthony will join a gifted offensive team helmed by former Coach of the Year Mike D’Antoni.

Stop me if you’ve heard that one before.

Back in 2011, when Anthony joined the New York Knicks via a blockbuster trade with the Denver Nuggets, a younger D’Antoni was in the midst of his third year with New York. While he didn’t exactly have a sterling record with the Knicks prior to the acquisition (89-129 before), things improved little upon Anthony’s arrival in the Big Apple (31-38 after). The two butted heads constantly and, after just a year (and an ultimatum forced on the Knicks by Anthony), D’Antoni was out the door; he resigned from his position and pursued work elsewhere.

Now, together once again, questions remain about how their relationship and, ultimately, their offensive styles will mesh in Houston. D’Antoni has already come out and said things will be different this time around, but nothing is so certain in the NBA; what is stopping things from going south as they did for the Knicks, who, despite a bevy of talent, just couldn’t make things work?

It’s important to understand where things went wrong in New York in order to look at where they could go wrong in Houston.

From the jump, the two weren’t exactly the best fit. Anthony wanted to play the way he had his entire career — heavy isolation, high usage basketball — while D’Antoni’s offense was spread out, predicated on ball movement, and closer to what we see in the modern offense.

Those two styles aren’t exactly conducive to the success of one another.

The Knicks finished the season 42-40, going just 13-14 in Anthony’s 27 games with the team. The two continued to be at odds with one another into the next season until, after leading the Knicks to an underwhelming 18-24 start, D’Antoni resigned. While things improved under Mike Woodson in 2012 — Anthony posted the highest usage rate of his career while the Knicks won 52 games — they quickly devolved into disaster and the Knicks, once again, found themselves in a hole that they are still trying to climb out of.

Now, on to Houston. This isn’t the same D’Antoni; he has changed and so has his offense. While ball movement still plays an integral role, D’Antoni has put much more of an emphasis on isolation plays in order to better fit the profile of his current roster.

The Rockets posted historic offensive numbers with James Harden and Chris Paul running the show, but did so unlike D’Antoni teams of the past. Gone are the days of the seven-seconds-or-less offense; the Rockets played at a pace (97.4 possessions per 48 minutes) that was middle of the pack, while their assist total came in at just 26th in the league, third worst among teams that made the postseason last year. Despite that, Houston managed to post the highest offensive rating (114.7) in the league.

While those stylistic changes should aid Anthony as he looks to rebound next season, they alone don’t make this the perfect fit for the Rockets. Anthony will never see the touches that he was once accustomed to in New York or Denver. He isn’t the same player he was five years ago, either; as his athleticism has declined, so too has Anthony’s ability to get past his defenders, leading to tougher, lower percentage shots that could sink the Rockets come the postseason.

The only thing that really holds Anthony back now is his own stubborn ignorance of those facts. He refused to adjust last season with the Oklahoma City Thunder because he still has “so much left in the tank.” Anthony posted some of the worst numbers of his career last season and, while Billy Donovan isn’t the offensive wizard that D’Antoni is, things should only get worse as Harden (36.1 percent usage rate) and Paul (24.5) dominate the ball if Anthony remains unwilling to change.

So, while his words may hold true, Anthony is no longer in a position where he needs to put the team on his back in order for it to be successful. Houston already has a well-established hierarchy, and Anthony is merely a column meant to buttress what is already in place. If he can’t come to accept that, the chance Houston is taking on him could backfire tremendously.

Still, Houston needs someone to eat the minutes vacated by the departure of Trevor Ariza and Luc Mbah a Moute in free agency. While he may not be able to match their defensive exploits, Anthony is still more than capable of filling their shoes, or even providing an upgrade, offensively. That potential upgrade alone could make the move a worthwhile one for the Rockets, who came just minutes from dethroning the Golden State Warriors despite the loss of Chris Paul in the Western Conference Finals.

For things to truly work out, however, Anthony must be willing to accept a change in his role, a diminished one in an offense that isn’t hurting for star power or shot takers, but one that desperately needs role players. If Anthony can adapt, he could be exactly what they need to challenge the Warriors. If not, Anthony’s arrival could blow up in D’Antoni’s face just as it did with the Knicks.

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NBA Daily: The NCAA’s Recent Policy Changes are Problematic

The NCAA made unilateral changes to its rules that may look good on paper but more likely make a difficult situation even more complicated.

James Blancarte

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Going into 1995 NBA Draft, the NBA still allowed high school players to enter straight into the NBA but few had actually done so over the years. That year, Kevin Garnett, an extremely talented high school prospect, went straight into the draft from high school and went on to have a Hall of Fame career. Kobe Bryant and LeBron James, like Garnett, also went straight to the NBA from high school and each have also had Hall of Fame careers. Many other similarly situated players such as Rashard Lewis, Jermaine O’Neal and Tracy McGrady succeeded on the same path. Yet concerns remained that although there were individual success stories, perhaps it would be best overall to have kids mature a bit more before entering the NBA. Eventually, through collective bargaining, new rules were put in place that prohibited high school players from entering the league.

As time has gone on there has been some frustration with the fact that perhaps these young men, legally adults at 18 years of age, have been unfairly prevented from earning at least one year of significant income as an NBA rookie. There is also frustration, mentioned below, at how the NCAA and college programs have policed themselves (or failed to do so) over the years. There is rampant abuse and under the table dealing that has largely benefitted the people around these young athletes and the schools, while often times harming the players or not benefitting them in any tangible way. The FBI has been conducting an investigation into these practices, which has shed new light and more focus onto the situation. Accordingly, now there is widespread discussion and speculation that the NBA again intends to reverse course and allow players to bypass the collegiate game.

With accusations of impropriety, constant attacks against the amateur model and an ongoing federal investigation, the NCAA took drastic action last Wednesday to counter the negativity around the college game — at least in appearance.

First the good part; players will be allowed to enter the draft and should they be not be chosen, the player may return to school under certain circumstances. Back at his collegiate program, a player can return to a place where he can continue to mature as a basketball player and as a college student. This is a nice option for many players and should have been available years ago.

For NBA teams, they now face the prospect of a first wave of high school seniors going straight to the NBA in addition to the other collegiate and international prospects. If it turns out that these high school prospects are collectively more prepared than expected and demonstrate they can contribute at a high level shortly after entering the league, there could be a sizable shift in how teams value first-round draft picks. Teams are already extremely hesitant to trade first-round picks, which means there would be some additional stagnation in the trade market. There are many complexities to this prospective new system that could have consequences that aren’t even foreseeable at this juncture.

Additionally, while this may be an appealing option for some players who are on the fence about going pro, it may not have as much widespread appeal. Some prospects may not realistically expect to be drafted. Once skipped over, a player is likely to seek compensation in the G-League or by playing international basketball. That’s the rub overall, the college game is sticking to the amateur model and the insistence that players not be compensated beyond the education they receive. Even worse, a player may have declared for the draft knowing that he might be leaving behind academic or conduct violations behind. Should that player attempt to go back, he would have to deal with any situation that joining the professional ranks would have avoided. The point here is that while this new rule may look good for the NCAA from a PR perspective, the truth is it may have little benefit to the college players overall.

Now the thornier part. As reported, the NCAA will allow “elite” high school prospects to obtain an agent. Previously this would have been a violation of NCAA rules that prevent amateur students from doing so. Should a player instead decide to go to college, he would have to break off his relationship with the agent. This adds more complications and issues to a system that is already plagued with questionable rules and policies.

In addition, it appears that USA Basketball was not initially thrilled to be put in a position to determine which players are considered “elite,” which could cause some more logistical issues. Also, there has been speculation about whether prospects participating in the USA Basketball system would be the only players selected or, at least, preferred over international prospects. Matt Norlander of CBS Sports spoke to NCAA’s senior vice president of basketball Dan Gavitt who explained this wasn’t the case.

“It is not going to be just the prospects who are Junior National Team players for USA Basketball. It’s going to be more than that. How that’s going to be determined, and how large a pool, is to be determined. That could be years away,” Gavitt stated.

There is much more to dive into on this issue unfortunately. The NCAA has seemingly taken a strategy to fixing issues that are symptoms of a bigger problem – that is the NCAA’s insistence on treating its players as students who should not be compensated rather than actual athletes. There are no easy solutions to this situation and adding more layers of complexity with unilateral changes such are likely to make matters worse.

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