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NBA AM: Paul Battling for 76ers Roster Spot

Brandon Paul talked to Basketball Insiders about fighting for a roster spot at Philadelphia 76ers training camp.

Alex Kennedy

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During NBA Summer League, it’s no secret that many players like have a good time. After all, many of these prospects are in their late teens or early 20s and this is the first time that they get to experience anything close to the NBA lifestyle. In fact, for some it’s the only time.

In July, Las Vegas clubs are often full of very tall men wearing NBA warm-ups (players love donning these out in public since they’re extremely comfortable and, more importantly, let everyone know, “Oh, yeah, I play for the team. No big deal…”). Even for unknown players who are just on a Summer League contract, it’s relatively easy to get V.I.P. treatment and free drinks at a club by playing the NBA card. Many players know this and enjoy their time in Las Vegas.

However, some players want nothing to do with the extracurricular activities and treat Summer League like a business trip. Take Brandon Paul, for example. At 25 years old, he played in both the Orlando Summer League and Las Vegas Summer League this year, and he entered each event with one thing on his mind: Earn an NBA contract.

Paul isn’t a wide-eyed kid who’s excited to be around the NBA festivities. He has played Summer League in the past, suited up in the NBA D-League and even had stints in Russia and Spain. For Paul, Summer League wasn’t about enjoying the Las Vegas nightlife and partying. This was his chance to show NBA executives, coaches and scouts what he can do on the court, how he carries himself and why he belongs on an NBA roster this upcoming season.

Last July, Paul wasn’t able to participate in Summer League due to a shoulder injury, making him even hungrier to shine this time around. He did just that, and his professional approach paid off.

Paul played for the Charlotte Hornets in the Orlando Summer League. He scored double digit points in his first four games, including a 17-point, 11-rebound, two-assist, two-steal, two-block outing against the Oklahoma City Thunder that impressed NBA decision-makers. He was confident and comfortable on the floor, and he carried himself like a veteran. With Charlotte, he ultimately averaged 15.3 points, 7.3 rebounds, 1.5 assists and 1.5 steals while shooting 39.1 percent from three-point range.

The Philadelphia 76ers liked what they saw and asked Paul to join them in Las Vegas. Once he arrived and got acclimated, he did well and made his presence felt all over the court. He had an 18-point, six-steal, two-rebound outing against the Brooklyn Nets. In a win over the D-League Select Team, he had 20 points, six rebounds and two steals in 24 minutes (while shooting 4-6 from three-point range). Over the final three games of Summer League with Philadelphia, Paul averaged 16.3 points, 3.3 rebounds and three steals in 25 minutes per game.

Philadelphia was so impressed that they signed Paul to a partially guaranteed contract. He will attend training camp with the 76ers on a $543,471 salary (of which $155,000 is guaranteed). It’s worth noting that Paul’s $155,000 is more money than Robert Covington, Hollis Thompson, Jerami Grant, T.J. McConnell, Shawn Long and James Webb have guaranteed to them in their own partial or non-guaranteed deals.

At first glance, it may seem like Paul is a long shot to make Philadelphia’s roster. After all, they have 20 players coming to training camp. However, a closer look reveals that only 11 of those players have a fully guaranteed deal – meaning there’s an opportunity for Paul and others to make the team and even carve out a spot in the rotation. Given the Sixers’ needs in the backcourt, Paul felt confident betting on himself with this situation.

At the very least, Paul will earn a six-figure payday for his camp commitment, which then would likely lead to a spot with the Sixers’ D-League affiliate (the Delaware 87ers) and the possibility of a midseason call-up. Philly clearly likes Paul’s game, so this could be a smart route for him to take.

After thriving in Summer League, grinding in the D-League and going abroad to Russia and Spain, the 25-year-old guard is closer to achieving his NBA dream than ever before.

Basketball Insiders caught up with Paul to discuss his professional journey, why he chose to sign with the 76ers, what he can bring to Philadelphia’s roster, what he learned overseas and much more.

Alex Kennedy: What was the moment like when you officially signed with the 76ers? I know you’ve been working toward this for a long time, so how did it feel to achieve that goal?

Brandon Paul: “It was great, real humbling. Just thinking about all of the stuff I went through and all of the hard work I put in – especially this past summer – it was just a really exciting moment. It didn’t really come as a shock, but it was hard to put my thoughts in words when I got the call from my agent, Adam Pensack. It’s a great feeling.”

Kennedy: After your performance in Summer League, there were quite a few teams showing interest in you. How did you decide on the 76ers?

Paul: “I just felt like, all around, it was the best decision for me to come in and compete. They obviously have a young roster and I kind of bring in a little bit of maturity to that roster. Obviously, I’m relatively young as well. But around those guys, I’m kind of the older one and I’m a little more seasoned because I played overseas and in the D-League. I think I can bring a little bit of toughness and maturity to the roster.”

Kennedy: You played in Russia and Spain. How was your experience overseas, and how did it help you grow as a player and as a person?

Paul: “I mean, it’s definitely tough for a player coming out of college to go overseas and kind of build their resume over there. A lot of guys feel like if they don’t get the NBA right away then it might not happen; I just had the mindset of staying positive and staying the course. I definitely think it helped a lot. It helped shape me as a player and as a man. I learned a lot about myself because you have a lot of alone time when you’re living more secluded. Your family and friends aren’t around – it’s just you and your team – so I definitely think playing over there helped me grow a lot more.”

Kennedy: You had to overcome a number of obstacles to get to this point, from going undrafted to dealing with various injuries. How frustrating were those setbacks at the time, and does it make your current success even sweeter?

Paul: “It was definitely frustrating – especially because the injuries occurred at, I would say, some of the worst times. Every time I had another opportunity, a setback happened. Everyone’s got their story and I’m just kind of building mine up. I think the mental aspect was a lot tougher than it was physically. The rehab was brutal, but from a mental point, you’re kind of like, ‘Why does this keep happening? Is it going to happen again?’ I have a good circle around me, though, and I just stayed positive no matter what. People were asking me questions about it like, ‘How do you feel?’ and I just kept speaking positively. I think that helped me get to where I am right now.”

Kennedy: You’ve always had a chip on shoulder and used different slights as motivation. What’s your mindset entering training camp with the 76ers?

Paul: “I just have to go in and do what I do. I’ve always been a hard worker and I’ve always prided myself on working harder than others around me. It’s not about trying to prove anything – that’s just really all I know, that’s how I grew up, that’s what I was taught. I plan on competing every single day and just showing guys that it’s nothing personal, it’s just basketball. When I go out there, I got a team out there, but it’s not about making friends. It’s about playing and getting yourself better and getting the team better. I just want to go out there and just kill every day and prove myself. I want to prove to the staff that I deserve a roster spot.”

Kennedy: It seemed like that was your approach in Summer League too. You weren’t messing around out there – you were looking to take someone’s job.

Paul: “I unfortunately missed some opportunities the last couple summers because of injuries, so just getting the Summer League opportunity with Charlotte and then Philly was a great experience and I appreciate all of the help they gave me.

“I knew when I was going to Vegas that it was just another opportunity to open some eyes up. Every day you step on the court, it’s a job interview and I used it. I wanted to prove myself – regardless of who was in the stands – that I’m an NBA player who can do multiple things for a team.”

Kennedy: For fans in Philadelphia who may not know your game all that well, what will you bring to this 76ers team?

Paul: “They’ll get a guy who competes extremely hard and enjoys playing both ends of the floor. I understand that 90-93 percent of individuals in the league are role players and I’m ready to come in and just do whatever role I need to in order to help the team be successful and help myself be successful and continue to build my resume. I’ve been known as a scorer my whole career and I score the ball at a high level, but at the same time I’m capable of guarding multiple positions and I definitely use my length to my advantage. I think that as I continue this process I’ll be able to show more and more people my capabilities as an athlete and as a pro.”

Kennedy: It seems strange to say, but you’re one of older guys on this Sixers squad at 25 years old. With your maturity and experience playing professionally, are you looking to take on a leadership role and helping some of these young guys in Philly?

Paul: “I think that’s something that the staff enjoys about me – that I’m seasoned. I played all throughout college, I played overseas for a couple of seasons and I have experience in the D-League. Those experiences help me to bring that maturity and the professionalism to this stage as well so any chance I get, I try to talk to them and pass on a little bit of my knowledge. I see myself as the rookie and the vet. Yes, it’s my first year on this stage, but at the same time it’s my fourth professional year so I’m not new to this.”

Kennedy: Two Drake lyrics in one answer! That was awesome.

Paul: “I just realized that. Literally as I said it, I realized it (laughs).”

Kennedy: Since Summer League, what has your offseason training been like?

Paul: “I’ve been all over the place training – Las Vegas, Charlotte, Chicago and now Philadelphia. It’s really just been a lot of rigorous workouts. I’m working on my explosion, my quickness, my shot consistency and being able to finish with contact.”

For more of our one-on-one interviews, check out our recent conversations with Boston Celtics point guard Isaiah Thomas, Los Angeles Lakers guard D’Angelo Russell, Indiana Pacers guard Jeff Teague, Portland Trail Blazers guard C.J. McCollum, Orlando Magic forward Aaron Gordon, Oklahoma City Thunder guard Victor Oladipo, Atlanta Hawks swingman Kent Bazemore, New York Knicks guard Courtney Lee, Indiana Pacers center Myles Turner, Los Angeles Lakers forward Larry Nance Jr., Atlanta Hawks forward DeAndre Bembry, New Orleans Pelicans guard E’Twaun Moore and Sacramento Kings swingman Garrett Temple.

Alex Kennedy is the Managing Editor of Basketball Insiders and this is his 10th season covering the NBA. He is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

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NBA Daily: Jimmy Butler’s Potential Absence Could Doom Minnesota

Should Jimmy Butler miss an extended period of time, the Minnesota Timberwolves could lose footing quickly in the tight Western Conference playoff race.

Dennis Chambers

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Say it ain’t so, Basketball Gods.

In his first game back from the All-Star break, coincidentally after logging zero minutes in the glorified exhibition game, Jimmy Butler left Friday night’s game with an apparent knee injury.

If the worst comes to fruition — a season-ending injury — Butler would join a laundry list of players whose seasons have been cut short.

 Butler’s Minnesota Timberwolves are in the midst of battling for position amongst their Western Conference peers for playoff spots. At the time of Butler’s injury, seeds three through nine are all separated by one game in the loss column.

Calling it a tight race out West would be a vast understatement. With a few more than 20 games to play, the seeding could land in a different order on basically a nightly basis. And for a team like Minnesota, losing their All-Star and veteran presence could be catastrophic.

But, not all hope is lost.

David Aldridge reported Friday night that there may be some light at the end of the tunnel.

Given how tight the race is amongst the conference, losing Butler for any extended period of time is going to be a big blow to the way Minnesota operates. Very literally, Butler produces a drastic improvement on both ends of the court his team.

On the surface, Butler’s averages are good. They don’t blow you away, but it’s clear that his presence is felt on a nightly basis. 22.4 points, 5.4 rebounds and five assists with a 59.3 true shooting percentage is more than worthy of an All-Star selection. But to the naked eye, it doesn’t scream that he’s the team’s most valuable player by a long shot.

So, let’s dig a little deeper.

When Butler is on the court, Minnesota benefits from a 116.3 offensive rating. Houston and Golden State have 115.7 and 115.4 offensive ratings for the season, respectively. The addition of Butler creates more free space for the likes of Karl-Anthony Towns and Andrew Wiggins to play with.

Speaking of those two, with the addition of an established superstar like Butler, they’ve been able to focus more on playing basketball than leading a locker room, allowing for growth in their games — Towns especially.

Truly coming into his own as one of the league’s best big men this season, arguably nobody on Minnesota’s roster benefits more from Butler’s performance on the wing than Towns does. On the court together, Towns sports a pretty 114.1 offensive rating, which produced a satisfying 9.3 net rating. That’s winning basketball.

Take Butler away, though, and things get ugly. Fast.

Because of his vast arsenal of offensive versatility, Towns’ offensive rating doesn’t suffer when Butler isn’t in the fold. But his defense? Well, it falls off of a cliff. Towns’ defensive rating balloons to 120.9, bringing that once impressive 9.3 net rating all the way down to -6.5. Butler alone accounts for a 15.8 point swing in Towns’ net rating. The levels of codependency from Towns to Butler in relation to effective basketball are incredibly concerning if the latter is lost for an extended period of time.

Basketball isn’t just a two-man game, though. So, while Minnesota’s younger All-Star benefits greatly from his elder counterpart, maybe the rest of the roster isn’t in such bad shape without him, right?

Wrong.

In fact, as you could probably assume, the production for the Timberwolves as a whole plummets when Butler grabs a seat on the bench. Shooting percentage, net rating, assist rate, rebound rate, finishing at the rim, defending and just about any other conceivable statistic you can find is worse for Minnesota when Butler isn’t on the floor.

Beyond all of the stats though, Butler represented more to the Timberwolves this season. He was the star to get the team over the hump. The veteran two-way impact player that could take just enough of the load off of the two budding studs in Towns and Wiggins to make Minnesota a threat night in and night out. Tom Thibodeau brought Butler over from Chicago because he knew the level of work ethic and leadership he would bring to a team that had talent, but needed guidance.

Up until Friday night, the pieces were falling into place.

The state of Minnesota will hold its collective breath while waiting for the results of Butler’s MRI. For the sake of Timberwolves fans, the organization and most importantly, Butler himself, hope for a clean scan.

Without it, and without Butler, the team could find itself in a free-fall amid this clustered Western Conference playoff race.

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Otto Porter Jr., Washington Wizards Aiming For Consistency

Spencer Davies has a one-on-one talk with Otto Porter about the Wizards’ up-and-down season and why they’ve been clicking over the last few weeks.

Spencer Davies

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When a team loses an All-Star point guard after dropping four out of five games while other teams continue to improve and climb up the standings, it’s usually a sign that things are headed south.

But the Washington Wizards have debunked that thanks to a commitment from literally every man on the roster to step up. Since John Wall went down with injury, they’ve won eight out of their last 10 games and are a half game back of the Cleveland Cavaliers for the number three seed in the Eastern Conference.

Why that is, is simple—there’s a balance.

“Everybody eats” is the mantra that Wall’s backcourt partner Bradley Beal came up with when the tide started to turn and the D.C. family has been living by it for weeks now.

The setback has definitely forced them to alter their style of play, but it hasn’t been a bad thing so far, according to Wizards head coach Scott Brooks.

“It’s definitely a challenge missing one of the best guards, one of the best players in the league,” Brooks said before Thursday’s game in Cleveland. “We’ve had to change definitely the way we play a little bit. We couldn’t expect our point guards to play like John. His speed you just don’t come by often.

“We have to play a little different. I think guys have stepped up defensively. We’ve played well. We definitely had some favorable games go our way with the scheduling, but the challenge is ahead of us now. We’ve got a lot of tough games coming up, but we just have to still keep playing and focus on each game.”

Otto Porter has been somebody who’s really kicked it into gear at a higher level and looks like himself again after a tough start to the New Year. Since January 30th, he’s averaging 18.8 points, 7.2 rebounds, and over a steal per game. On nearly 14 attempts per game during the stretch, he’s shot above 52 percent from the field.

When asked how Washington can best fill the void of Wall while he’s on the sidelines, he said it’s not possible to. Rather than focusing on that specific facet, it’s a responsibility of the group collectively to keep trending in the right direction.

“You don’t,” Porter told Basketball Insiders. “I mean you just have to, next man up. You really can’t. X-Factor is everybody steppin’ up. With the guys that we have, it’s very simple. Just go out there and play for each other.

“Getting out in transition. Getting stops. Creating points. Threes. The ball going from side to side. That’s how we play. We goin’ through adversity, so we took the challenge.”

Mind you, this is a Wizards team that was once reportedly divided in the locker room. There were rumblings of disdain among certain players. Tweets, Instagram posts, and on-air interviews fueled the fire even more as the losses continued to pile up.

However, we all know the solution to any sort of rough patch is winning games. As soon as the victories started to come, the noise started to quiet down more and more.

“That’s with any sport for real,” Porter told Basketball Insiders after inquiring whether the negativity was overblown.

“I mean you gon’ have your ups and downs. You gon’ have that. But we’re gonna stick together no matter the wins or the losses. We’re gonna stick together. We’re not gonna let anything break us apart. That’s just how we feel.”

The All-Star break came at a good time for Porter, who admitted to Basketball Insiders that he was playing through with nagging injuries in the first half of the season and getting a week to see family and recuperate “was what I needed.”

In the meantime, he kept in contact with Beal, who was experiencing his first All-Star weekend in four years, except this time around he was selected by Team LeBron as a part of the big game.

“All-Star, he said he was mad busy,” Porter told Basketball Insiders of Beal’s hectic three days in Los Angeles. “That sucks ‘cause you know you really wanna—I mean All-Star is cool, but the guys all busy during All-Star. Seeing people, events, stuff like that, so you don’t really get a break. He enjoyed it though.”

Porter raved over the season Beal has had and what it’s meant to Washington. There hasn’t been a change in mentality at all, but the improvements are evident.

“He’s always been motivated,” Porter told Basketball Insiders. “Each year he’s adding bits and pieces to his game every year that make him a threat and it shows this year.”

Another teammate of Porter’s that has taken on the challenge is Kelly Oubre. This month hasn’t been kind to him so far as a shooter, but taking the season as a whole, the third year forward is hitting a career-high 36.9 percent of his threes and averaging close to 12 points per game.

Not only that, but Oubre is always locked in defensively with an in-your-face method of guarding his opponents. It’s a physical style that constantly bothers opponents and most of the time, it works.

“He’s been improving,” Porter told Basketball Insiders. “He’s been putting in a lot of work. I’ve seen him put in so much work this offseason on his shot improving his mechanics and it’s paying off.

“Aggressive defensively, getting his hands on a lot of balls, deflections, steals. That’s what we want from him every game.”

Brooks has rewarded Oubre and Porter’s efforts by giving them a ton of playing time, something that he doesn’t see changing anytime soon considering the job they’ve done with the extra load.

“They’re gonna have to keep playing a lot of major minutes and keep getting better along the way,” Brooks said. “Otto’s really steady, solid. He’s started to make some shots again.

“And Kelly, he hasn’t shot the ball well in February, but we need him to break out of that and start shooting the ball better. With Kelly to me, it’s always how he’s locked in and focused on the defensive end.”

In order for the Wizards to continue scaling the ranks in the East it’s going to come down to consistency, a hurdle that they’ve tried to clear in past years and have a goal of leaping this season.

“We have to,” Brooks said. “Firstly, just takes that consistent effort to win games. This is not an easy league. Nobody feels sorry for you. Nobody gives you wins. You’ve got to go out there and earn it.

“I like the spirit of our team. We’re willing to accept the challenges. We know it’s not gonna be easy, but I like how we’re playing.”

Porter’s personal goal is to make it through 82 games healthy, but he agrees with his head coach about Washington’s top priority as a team.

“Right now yeah, it’s consistency,” Porter told Basketball Insiders. “And just sticking to what we do, sticking to our character. We know what type of players we are. We know how to play the right way and play Wizards basketball, so that’s what we’re gonna focus on.”

So far, so good.

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NBA Daily: Tank Tracker 2018

Basketball Insiders looks at the NBA’s race to the bottom as teams jockey for lottery position.

Buddy Grizzard

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With the NBA All-Star game behind and the home stretch of the regular season ahead, this is the time of year when contenders contend and pretenders stop pretending. It’s time for the NBA’s annual race to the bottom with a crowded field featuring four teams from each conference with better odds of getting help through the draft than making a playoff run.

Although Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban was fined $600,000 for public statements detrimental to the NBA for saying the Mavericks should tank, the assumption here is always that players play to win. Every year the NBA Draft brings 30 new first round picks with guaranteed contracts into the league (minus any players that opt to play overseas). That’s 30 NBA jobs that will be taken away from veterans and given to rookies, not counting second-round picks and undrafted free agents who will take still more jobs. Rank-and-file players are playing for their place in the league, not to help their team get in position to draft a potential replacement.

Here we’ll look at teams that are clearly out of the playoff race and factors that could impact draft position as the final stretch of the season unfolds. Below is a tweet from ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski from September showing odds to land a top-three pick. This is the final season under the old lottery system (odds in parenthesis) before the new system takes effect next season.

Starting next year, the four worst teams will have nearly-identical odds to land a top-three pick. Since this is the last year in which teams dramatically increase odds of landing a top-three pick the more they lose, the race for lottery position could be as fun to watch as the race for playoff position. With a deep talent pool for the upcoming NBA Draft, the plot gets even thicker.

The Playoff Contenders

Before we look at teams that are clearly not contending for a playoff spot, we’ll mention teams that are out of playoff position but fighting to get in. In the Eastern Conference, the Detroit Pistons acquired Blake Griffin before the trade deadline and are only 1.5 games behind the Miami HEAT for the eighth playoff seed. If Detroit can get point guard Reggie Jackson back healthy — a big if — then the Pistons could get into the playoffs and constitute a scary match-up in the first round.

Tim Bontemps of the Washington Post tweeted Wednesday that Jackson has been cleared for light running and shooting as he continues to recover from an ankle injury.

Also in the East, although the Charlotte Hornets appear headed nowhere, it’s a veteran-heavy squad that will do all it can to claw its way to a playoff spot. With point guard Kemba Walker making a second All-Star appearance and veterans Dwight Howard and Nicolas Batum uninterested in building through the draft this late in their careers, expect Charlotte to do everything in its power to close the five-game gap with the HEAT.

In the West, although the Clippers moved on from Griffin, the team remains just one game behind the eighth-seed Pelicans with a 7-3 record in its last 10 games. The Clippers are another veteran-laden squad with too much pride to play for lottery balls. However, the Clippers’ hopes of being a playoff spoiler are complicated by the league’s hottest team, the Jazz. Utah owns a league-best 11-game win streak and sits a half game behind the Clippers.

Honorable mention goes to the Lakers, which sit a dismal eight games behind the Pelicans in the Western Conference standings. The Lakers have almost no chance to make the playoffs but won’t be participating in this season’s tank-a-thon since either the 76ers or Celtics will own its first-round draft pick. L.A. traded two future firsts for Steve Nash in 2012 but has yet to convey the final pick due to protections in 2015, 2016 and 2017. The pick will go to Philly if it’s first overall or lower than fifth, but will otherwise convey to the Celtics. The 76ers used the pick with added protections to move up last year and draft Markelle Fultz with the first overall pick.

Additionally, the Nets do not make the list since the Cavaliers own their unprotected first round pick from the Kyrie Irving trade with the Celtics. The Nets aren’t tanking, they just lack the talent to compete and currently hold the league’s fifth-worst record.

New York Knicks, 24-36

The Knicks are the last entrant into the NBA’s annual race to the bottom owing to Kristaps Porzingis’ season-ending ACL injury. Prior to the injury, the Knicks were doing everything in the team’s power to start the post-Carmelo Anthony era with a playoff appearance. With Porzingis now sidelined for an extended period, the goal shifts to improving the talent around him.

Chicago Bulls, 20-38

The Bulls recently announced that Cristiano Felicio and David Nwaba will replace veterans Robin Lopez and Justin Holiday in the starting lineup. Both received a DNP-CD in Thursday’s one-point loss to the 76ers. This is a team in naked tank mode, but it has the most games remaining against other teams on this list. Chicago has its tanking work cut out for it, but the recent lineup decisions show that the Bulls are serious about getting the job done.

Memphis Grizzlies, 18-38

While the Bulls are shameless in pursuit of lottery balls, you can’t blame the Grizzlies for the horrendous injury luck that put the team in this position. It’s a lost season for Memphis, and help in the lottery could be difficult to find since only the Bulls and Magic have more games remaining against teams on this list.

Orlando Magic, 18-40

The Magic have the second-worst record in the East but are matched by the Kings and Mavericks. Counting the Grizzlies, this makes six teams with only 18 wins. This is the heart of the tanking field, and the Magic fully committed when it traded starting point guard Elfrid Payton, a former lottery pick, for a future second-round pick. Orlando has a six-game stretch against teams in playoff contention that should help, but it also has a large number of games remaining against lottery contenders.

Sacramento Kings, 18-40

The Kings did well to get out of the $19 million owed to George Hill next season in a pre-deadline trade with the Cavaliers. Losing the team’s starting point guard also has the benefit of more minutes to develop De’Aaron Fox while upping the odds of adding a quality piece next to him in the draft. Unfortunately, the Kings had a recent stretch of four wins in ten games.

Dallas Mavericks, 18-40

No caveats or disclaimers are needed here since Cuban has gone public with his desire to lose as many games as possible. Aiding Cuban’s cause is that the Mavs are tied with the Hawks and Suns for fewest remaining games against teams on this list.

Atlanta Hawks, 18-41

Equal to the Suns for the league’s worst record, the Hawks come out of the All-Star break in pole position for the Tank 500. However, the team is 4-6 in the last 10 games and lost a ton of close games this year. The Hawks are literally better than the record suggests, and join the Magic and Kings by insisting on shooting themselves in the foot with late-season wins that could poison the lottery well.

As NBA.com’s K.L. Chouinard noted, the Hawks have a net rating of +9.1 in minutes Ersan Ilyasova and Dewayne Dedmon share. Only John Collins and Isaiah Taylor have out-performed this combo among two-man units that have shared at least 200 minutes.

Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer wisely opted to limit the pair to 227 minutes together this season, but the Hawks seem like a team in danger of tumbling out of position for a top-three pick despite how well-positioned the team is currently.

Phoenix Suns, 18-41

When it comes to the gold standard in tanking, nobody tops the Suns. The team shares a league-worst record with the Hawks, has a tough remaining schedule and is showing how it’s done with a 1-9 record in its last 10 games. With the team’s litany of poor draft selections and disastrous trades and free agency decisions, the lottery is the only place Phoenix can turn to for improvement. The prediction here is that nobody out-tanks the Suns the rest of the way.

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