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NBA Daily: First Quarter Grades: Pacific Division

Jesse Blancarte continues Basketball Insiders’ “First Quarter Grades” series with a look at the Pacific Division.

Jesse Blancarte

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Basketball Insiders started off this week by giving the Central Division teams grades for their respective performances through the first quarter of the NBA season. We continue the grading by taking a look at the Pacific Division, which features a few teams that are beating early-season expectations, including the Los Angeles Clippers and Sacramento Kings. While some teams have earned high marks early this season, the Pacific Division and the NBA still belongs to the Golden State Warriors, who have run into some drama this season but still have the best overall talent.

With all of this in mind, let’s get to the grades:

Los Angeles Clippers – A

It is almost December and the Clippers hold the No. 1 seed in the Western Conference. There was a small group of people who had guarded optimism about the Clippers before the start of the 2018-19 season but no one predicted that the Clippers would stand atop the Western Conference standings at this point in the season. Considering this, it’s hard to argue that the Clippers have earned anything less than an A through the first quarter of the season.

Beyond the fact that the Clippers are winning at a high rate, this team is almost a complete contrast to the “Lob City” era, which came to an end last season. Unlike the Clippers teams led by Chris Paul, Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan, this team has no elite star player and the players clearly enjoy playing with one another.

Tobias Harris is having a career-year thus far and is lining himself up for a nice payday when he hits the free agent market after the offseason. Danilo Gallinari has been healthy for the most part and is knocking down three-pointers and getting to the line frequently. Gilgeous-Alexander has been arguably the most consistent guard in spite of the fact that he plays alongside proven veterans like Patrick Beverley and Avery Bradley. Lou Williams continues to be an offensive force off the bench. Additionally, Montrezl Harrell has been a force on both ends of the court so far this season. He has become a lethal offensive weapon as a rolling big man out of the pick and roll and has become an effective defender and shot blocker as well despite being an undersized center.

The Clippers have defeated some of the best teams in the league, including the Oklahoma City Thunder, Houston Rockets, Portland Trail Blazers, Milwaukee Bucks, Memphis Grizzlies, San Antonio Spurs and Golden State Warriors. The Clippers may come down to earth at some point this season but for now they have done more than enough to earn an A.

Los Angeles Lakers – B

Signing LeBron James was an amazing step forward for the Lakers. But the subsequent signings of Rajon Rondo, JaVale McGee, Lance Stephenson and Michael Beasley left many to wonder whether the Lakers would make the playoffs this season – even with James leading the charge. We knew there would be an adjustment period for this team early on, but the Lakers’ defense was hemorrhaging points in the first few weeks of the season and James stated he was losing his patience.

Fortunately for the Lakers, Tyson Chandler and the Phoenix Suns agreed to a buyout, which made it possible for him to sign with L.A. Chandler isn’t putting up impressive box score statistics but his presence on the court is making a positive impact for the Lakers. The Lakers are holding teams to 107.5 points per 100 possessions, which ranks 10th in the NBA. That is a massive leap forward from where the Lakers were just a few weeks ago. Though that may have something to do with the fact that they have faced some teams with less-than-stellar offenses in their last few matchups. Chandler is limited at this point in his career but it’s clear that he is providing a level of defensive competency at center that the team had been missing.

The Lakers will likely continue to have ups and downs throughout the season considering how many new rotation players they have and continue to integrate this season. However, after a conqueringly rocky start, it’s fair to say the Lakers have stabilized the ship and earned a solid B.

 Sacramento Kings – A

The Kings have failed to make the playoffs since the 2005-06 season (when players like Brad Miller, Peja Stojakovic and Shareef Abdur-Rahim were still in the NBA). Between this long playoff drought and several avoidable missteps along the way, it was fair to not expect much from this year’s team. However, Sacramento has been of the surprise stories so far this season, posting a 10-10 record and holding the eighth seed in the deep Western Conference.

The Kings have managed this behind the efforts of De’Aaron Fox, Buddy Hield, Willie Cauley-Stein, Bogdan Bogdanovic, Nemanja Bjelica and Marvin Bagley, whom the Kings drafted with the No. 2 overall pick in this year’s draft. Fox has been pushing the pace for the Kings, who are ranked second in overall pace so far this season, trailing only the Atlanta Hawks. The Kings’ offense isn’t setting the league on fire as it ranks just 19th in efficiency (per 100 possessions), but on any given night they can put a significant amount of pressure on their opponents with speed and shooting. On that front, Buddy Hield has been hitting 45.1 percent of his 5.7 three-point attempts per game, while Nemanja Bjelica has knocked down 50.7 percent of his 3.4 three-point attempts per game.

Simply put, several of the Kings’ young players have taken a step forward and are contributing at a higher level than anticipated entering this season. Sacramento has stumbled a bit of late, losing six of their last eight games, but several of those losses came against tough opponents like the Denver Nuggets and New Orleans Pelicans.

Don’t expect the Kings to make the postseason but let’s give them credit for taking a big step forward so far this season and beating everyone’s expectations so far.

Phoenix Suns – D-

The Suns are currently dead last in the Western Conference with a 4-15 record. Considering how young the Suns’ key players are, it’s not surprising that they are already effectively eliminated from playoff contention. The problem is, however, that Phoenix made moves to be competitive this season, such as signing Trevor Ariza to a one-year $15 million deal and acquiring veteran sharpshooter Ryan Anderson. Despite these moves, the Suns currently rank 28th in offensive and defensive efficiency and have been an easy win for most of their opponents thus far this season. Additionally, the Suns have thus far failed to address their glaring hole at point guard and have not let Devin Booker take over as the team’s lead playmaker.

The good news is that their core players, like Devin Booker and Deandre Ayton, have posted solid numbers thus far. Booker’s shooting percentages are concerning (32.3 percent from beyond the arc), but he is posting 24.9 points, 3.7 rebounds, 7.1 assists and 1.1 steals per game. Additionally, Ayton has looked solid on both ends of the court and is posting 16.9 points, 10.4 rebound, 2.8 assists, 0.6 assists and 0.7 blocks per game.

All things considered, it’s hard to have much optimism for the Suns’ performance so far this season. This is especially true when there was so much optimism about the offensive and defensive system head coach Igor Kokoskov was putting in place this season.

Golden State Warriors – C+

The Warriors currently hold the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference with a 15-7 record. Golden State is also posting some of the best offensive numbers in the league, while struggling defensively, especially in the recent absence of Draymond Green. So why are we giving the Warriors a C+? Because of the locker room drama that became public in the Warriors’ recent loss to the Los Angeles Clippers in which Green berated Kevin Durant for a variety of issues, including his impending free agency. These issues have calmed a bit but there are reports that the issue has not gone away completely and may not until there is more clarity regarding Durant’s free agency.

The other issue goes back to the team’s defense. The Warriors have mostly been known as an offensive powerhouse during their recent run. However, Golden State has also been a juggernaut defensively, with Green anchoring the team, often times at center. Green hasn’t been quite as effective this season in that role and no other player has stepped up to fill in for that loss. It could be the case that Green will bounce back when he returns from his recent injury, but that isn’t clear at this point. Green has also fallen off as a three-point threat this season, shooting just 22.2 percent on 2.1 attempts per game. Green may recover on this front once Steph Curry is healthy and able to create the space and time for Green to get his shot off from distance, which has been missing during his absence.

The Warriors still have far and away the league’s best roster and is maintaining the No. 2 seed while struggling with injuries and locker room drama, so we aren’t sounding the alarms yet. But as far as assessing a grade through the first quarter of the season, we think a C+ is appropriate.

Jesse Blancarte is a Deputy Editor for Basketball Insiders. He is also an Attorney and a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

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NBA Daily: Fixing the Denver Nuggets

Following a surprisingly successful postseason run, the Nuggets are off to a relatively slow start. Drew Maresca examines what’s going on in Denver in the latest edition of Basketball Insiders’ “Fixing” series.

Drew Maresca

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The Denver Nuggets have been on the rise for a while, but it all came together for them last season. If they weren’t already on your radar, a postseason that included two come-from-behind series wins should guarantee that they are now.

The Nuggets finished the 2019-20 season with a record of 46-27 and advanced to the Western Conference Finals where they lost to the eventual NBA champion Los Angeles Lakers. Along the way, Nikola Jokic proved that he’s one of the best players in the league, while they also received a significant boost from the rising star Jamal Murray, who scored 30 or more points in six of the team’s 19 postseasons games. Michael Porter Jr. also proved his back is just fine after a serious pre-draft injury and that he’s a real threat in the NBA. So what’s there to fix?

Well, the Nuggets are off to an uninspiring start. They are currently 6-6, good for just seventh in the Western Conference. While they’re supremely talented, they must get back on track – otherwise, the team could be in for a long 2020-21 offseason.

What’s Working

Denver’s offense is still effective. Entering play last night, they were scoring 116.5 points per game, good for fifth in the NBA. They draw a lot of fouls, too – 22.3 per game to be exact – which is tied for first in the entire league. So, that’s a start.

Jokic, meanwhile, is still Jokic. He’s playing better than ever and has legitimately entered the MVP conversation. As of last night, he was averaging a triple-double with 24.3 points, 10.9 rebounds and 10.5 assists per game. He’s also shooting an insane 41.2% on three-point attempts and 82.1% from the charity stripe.

Porter Jr., who has missed the last seven games with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis, began the season on a tear. He showed flashes last season, but he’s done it with consistency so far this season. Porter Jr. is averaging 19.5 points on 42.3% shooting from deep – and he was really hooping in his last game, scoring 30 points on 12-for-18 shooting with 10 rebounds.

JaMychal Green is another bright spot that has done a lot to help replace Jerami Grant, who was lost to free agency. He came over from the Los Angeles Clippers as a free agent and he’s fit in very nicely. Green began the season on the bench due to an injury and, in the four games for which he was out, the Nuggets went 1-3 and gave up 120 or more points in three of those four games. Since Denver has surrendered only 109 points per game, which would be good for the 11th fewest in the NBA. He’s also shot the ball incredibly well (52.8% on three-point attempts), while his presence means that the Nuggets won’t have to rely as heavily on 35-year-old Paul Millsap. The hope is, if Green can stay on the court, the defense will continue to even out.

What’s Not Working

A number of things aren’t working right now for Denver. First and foremost, the Nuggets haven’t put forth a complete effort too often. For example, they built up an 18-point lead in the first half against the Brooklyn Nets earlier this week in which they scored 70 points. They went on to only score 46 in the second half and lost the game 122-116.

On a related note, Denver has also failed to close out tight games. Of their six losses, four were within three points or went to overtime.

Then there are the high-level defensive issues. Entering play last night, the Nuggets had the sixth-worst defensive rating in the league and were allowing opponents to shoot 39% on three-point attempts – also good for sixth-worst. Worse, all of that has been done while playing the fourth easiest schedule in the league.

Drilling down to individual player issues, Murray’s struggles haven’t helped. Yes, his numbers are alright, but 19.7 points, 3.8 assists and 2.9 rebounds is a bit underwhelming considering the performance he put on in the bubble last season. His shooting is down slightly, most notably from between 3-10 feet from the basket (36.8%), and he’s struggled a bit from the free-throw line, too (76.3%, down from 88.1%).

What Needs To Change

First of all, the Nuggets need time to acclimate to one another; the team added seven new players this offseason and when you consider the shortened training camp and limited preseason – which was really only one week long – that leaves little time to build synergy. Theoretically, that should improve with time.

Porter Jr.’s defense is another aspect that must change. He is regularly Denver’s soft spot in the defense because he either loses focus or takes defensive shortcuts. The upside, Porter Jr. is still just a sophomore and his defensive should improve with time – he certainly has the requisite skills needed to be a successful defender (e.g., length and athleticism). So let’s give him a little more time before we make any bold claims about him.

Finally, the Nuggets have to find a way to deploy Bol Bol. Bol is averaging just 6 minutes per game. Sure, he’s incredibly lean and might not match up well in the half court with most bigs. Additionally, he’s a bit hesitant to shoot, despite a solid range. But, while the Nuggets are clearly in win-now mode, what contender couldn’t use a 7’2” shooter with a 7’8” wingspan? If they get Bol a bit more burn and he can mature, it would give the Nuggets one of the most unique weapons in the entire league. And, to Denver’s credit, Bol did receive the first two start of his young career in back-to-back games this week — perhaps that change is already underway.

The Nuggets may have started slowly, but all should be well in Denver. The Western Conference is incredibly competitive, but the Nuggets have more talent than most and, assuming finishing the season is realistic given COVID-19’s impact on it already, the Nuggets should be comfortable with where they are, regardless of their early-season record.

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NBA Daily: Fixing The Houston Rockets

Matt John continues Basketball Insiders’ “Fixing” series by taking a look at the newly-minted Houston Rockets, a team that now has given itself plenty of options.

Matt John

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In the most well-timed edition of Fixing ever, we’re taking a look at the very recently-revamped Houston Rockets. We all knew that one trade was coming one way or the other and now the time has arrived. For how well-designed this beautiful era of basketball was for the Rockets, it surely didn’t deserve the anti-climactic ending it got. Yet here we are. For the first time since Yao Ming’s retirement, Houston is starting from scratch.

Is all hope lost in H-Town? Well, losing Mike D’Antoni, Daryl Morey and Harden is basically like the Justice League losing Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman in one swift motion. It would be a major setback for anyone. In situations like this, it’s not about what you lost. It’s about how you respond to what you lost. To their credit, Houston had time to prepare for the disintegration of the Harden-D’Antoni-Morey era, and they haven’t taken their departures lying down.

They’ve wiped the slate mostly clean and, even if there’s definitely room for improvement, the new-look Rockets are a little more exciting than what meets the eye.

What’s Working?

It is a shame that Harden never gave this group a chance. Houston had a better offseason than they were given credit for because the high-profile personnel that they lost (or were about to lose) overshadowed what they brought in. Compared to past teams that faced similar circumstances, Houston could have done a lot worse. Let’s start with the best-kept secret that gets more and more exposed by the hour: Christian Wood.

NBA nerds hyped up Wood throughout the offseason for how great he looked during the brief time he was the full-time center in Detroit – averaging nearly 23/10 on 56/40/76 splits. When you take the sample size (13 games) and how Detroit fared in that stretch (they lost all but one game) into account, it’s understandable why it was hard to buy stock in Wood’s potential during the mini off-season.

That’s why Houston got him at the value they did and he’s already one of the league’s better bargains. Those numbers he put up as a Piston have carried on with the Rockets; while his 53/34/66 splits with almost two blocks per game have put him on the map. Wood’s ascension hasn’t led to much team success yet, but he’s the last player to blame for that.

Then there’s Houston’s more well-repped new addition, John Wall. Wall’s probably never going to live up to the $40+ million deal that Houston is paying him, but they didn’t acquire him for that reason. They acquired him in the hopes of him giving them more bang for their buck than Russell Westbrook did. The results have been a mixed bag, but that’s to be expected after what he’s been through. It’s been encouraging to see that on a good day, he still has most of his form.

There are plenty of games left for him to find consistency. We also have to keep in mind that Wall’s just getting his feet wet following two awful injuries. Even if he’s not the same Wall from his prime, this has worked out a lot better for Houston than Westbrook has in Washington. Having the better player as well as an additional first-round pick should be counted as an absolute win for the Rockets.

There are other stand-out players: It looks like the Rockets found another keeper in rookie Jae’Sean Tate who, along with David Nwaba, have infused the Rockets with badly needed energy.

Things were obviously better last year when Harden and co. were content, but the Rockets are far from a disaster.

What’s Not Working?

Well, James Harden. Plain and simple. When a superstar wants out, it wears the team down internally. That elephant is too big for the room to ignore, clear that both sides were done with each other by the end. Houston deserves props for willing to get “uncomfortable” just as they promised, but a superstar wanting out brings down the team’s morale no matter what.

It’s why Houston started 3-6 with the league’s ninth-lowest net rating at minus-1.8. There were other factors at play here with all the shuffling parts, but there’s no need for fluff. Harden’s trade demand loomed too large for it not to affect the Rockets. It’s hard for everyone when the best player on the team isn’t buying in. His teammates were complaining about him publicly.

The upshot is that it’s over now. Losing James Harden the player certainly isn’t addition by subtraction – in Houston’s case, that’s Westbrook – but losing James Harden the distraction could certainly be for this season.

What’s Next?

Now that the dust has settled, the Rockets can finally take a deep breath and sort out both their present and their future. Presently, there’s going to be even more shuffling now than there was before. At the very least, the roster is going to have players who should be on the same page.

Houston may still have some loose ends from its previous era. From the looks of things, PJ Tucker could be the next one to go. Houston’s prospects are on the come up, but a player with Tucker’s abilities should be on a contender. That’s something that the Rockets, as of now, are not. The same goes for Eric Gordon, but it’s tough to see any of the elite teams willing to put up enough salaries to trade for his contract.

Then there’s the newly-acquired Victor Oladipo.

Oladipo has been a good soldier in spite of the trade rumors that have buzzed around him over the last several months. Indiana trading him to Houston signified that he wasn’t re-signing with them. Houston provides a unique opportunity for Oladipo to further re-establish his value as a star. It’s hard to foresee if he’s in their long-term plans or if he’s another asset to move in their rebuild.

With all that said, new head coach Stephen Silas seems to have won over the players. After beating the San Antonio Spurs last night without Harden or Wall, the Rockets, despite not being in the tier of elite teams anymore, should be excited for what the season holds.

As for what the future will bring, their outlook is a lot brighter than it was back in September. Even if they’ll face the repercussions of giving up most of their own first-round picks for Westbrook and Robert Covington last year, they just hauled in a massive load of first-round picks and four pick swaps combined for Westbrook, Covington and Harden since then.

The development of players should put Houston in a good light, which could pay huge dividends for their chances in free agency. We’ve seen teams establish a great team culture while building up a promising future – ahem, the very same Brooklyn Nets that just cashed in for Harden proved that.

The Rockets might be next in line.

The days of Houston being a contender are gone for now. But, thankfully, the days of the Rockets becoming one of the NBA’s premier League Pass favorites may have only begun.

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NBA Daily: Payton Pritchard — Boston’s Bench Band-Aid

Basketball Insiders’ Shane Rhodes breaks down the fortuitous start to Payton Pritchard’s rookie season and what it’s meant to the Boston Celtics.

Shane Rhodes

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For the Boston Celtics, Payton Pritchard has been exactly what the doctor ordered.

Boston sported, arguably, the NBA’s worst bench unit a season ago. Despite a fearsome-foursome of Jaylen Brown, Gordon Hayward, Jayson Tatum and Kemba Walker, their lack of depth hurt them all season long. It stood in direct contrast to their Eastern Conference Finals opponent, the Miami HEAT, and, ultimately, sank the Celtics’ shot at the NBA Finals.

Now, with Hayward gone to the Charlotte Hornets and Walker on the mend, it was only logical to expect that dearth to once again be their Achilles heel. But, on the contrary, the bench has been rejuvenated — or, at the very least, much improved — to start the 2020-21 season.

And, albeit unexpectedly, Boston has the rookie out of Oregon to thank for that.

Pritchard, the 26th pick in the 2020 NBA Draft, faced some serious questions about his game in the lead up to the season. He left the NCAA as the recipient of both the Bob Cousy and Lute Olson awards, given to the nation’s top point guard and non-freshman player, respectively, and served as a leader for the Ducks throughout his four years with the team.

However, in the NBA, a league that’s far bigger, faster and stronger than any competition he’s ever faced, plenty were concerned as to how Pritchard’s game might translate. He’ll never be the most athletic player on the court and, when combined with his 6-foot-2 frame, that raised some serious concerns about his defensive viability at the game’s highest level.

On top of that, Pritchard was far from the only addition the Celtics made this offseason; fellow rookie Aaron Nesmith was thought by some to be the best shooter in the draft, while Jeff Teague and Tristan Thompson are battle-tested veterans that would demand a rotation spot from the jump.

Despite those stacked odds, however, Pritchard immediately took a rotation spot for his own, ahead of the higher drafted Nesmith and alongside the veteran Teague in Boston’s pecking order. In doing so, he’s brought a major spark to a bench that desperately needed one.

Save for a 23 point, 8 assist performance against the Toronto Raptors, he hasn’t jumped out of the boxscore. But Pritchard’s played with a veteran’s confidence and has contributed in nearly every game so far this season.

In fact, he’s played with a tenacity that even some of the more hard-nosed veterans lack, while his knack for the timely play has put Boston in the position to win on almost every possession. Pritchard is a +45 in his 10 games played, good for second among rookies and third among Celtics.

Like on this steal and drawn foul with the clock winding down against the Washington Wizards. Or his tip-in game-winner against the HEAT. Pritchard, at all times, is aware of where he needs to be on the court and, more importantly, when he needs to be there to put the team in the best position to succeed. Likewise, he’s moved with or without the ball and put himself in the position to help his teammates make the easy play as often as possible.

That presence of mind is something you just can’t teach — and Pritchard has it in spades.

Beyond the court, Pritchard has easily endeared himself to his Celtics teammates. Brown referred to him as “the GOAT” after just his fourth game, a win over the Pacers in which Pritchard finished with 10 points, 5 rebounds and 5 assists in just over 27 minutes and was clutch down the stretch. Marcus Smart, known for his tenacious style of play, has said “the sky’s the limit” for Pritchard and has noted many similarities between himself and the rookie as far back as the preseason.

A bit more reserved, head coach Brad Stevens said “[Pritchard]’s had more good nights, for sure, than not,” after the rookie flashed against the Raptors.

Still, it’s clear Stevens, like the others, has quickly taken a liking to Pritchard and, further, has expected a lot of the late-first rounder. Pritchard, on multiple occasions and despite his lack of NBA experience, has served as part of Boston’s closing lineup, an ultimate show of respect from a coach like Stevens that values defensive execution above most else on the court.

“We’re going to ask him to do a lot right now. And, fair or unfair to him, he’s going to have to be consistent for us, for us to have a chance to be a good team.”

And Stevens is right; to be the best version of themselves, Pritchard must continue to improve his own game and help push the bench even further.

Of course, that kind of pressure is nothing new to Pritchard who, over his four seasons with the Ducks, carried the team on his shoulders and constantly stepped up when they needed him most. And, while he’s been lauded with praise, the rookie has continued to stay humble.

“Coming in, I’m just trying to do my part,” Pritchard said after the team’s aforementioned win over the Pacers. “It’s my fourth game, everything’s coming at me fast and I’m still figuring things out.”

“I just want to win and I want to help as much as I can to get a win.”

As the Celtics forge their path ahead and continue to outfit the roster, players that not only contribute right away but can elevate the play of Boston’s star duo, Tatum and Brown, will be the priority.

And, if any of them are as rock-solid as Pritchard has been so far, the Celtics will be well on their way to an NBA title.

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