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NBA Daily: Pelicans Shouldn’t Rush A Davis Deal

Anthony Davis has asked out of New Orleans just ahead of the trade deadline. Spencer Davies writes on how things got to this point and what the future holds for both parties.

Spencer Davies

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It’s time to play the game again: Where will *insert superstar here* land after making a trade demand?

ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski started out our week with a major news drop, reporting that Anthony Davis has requested a trade and will not re-sign once his contract is up in New Orleans. Rich Paul, Davis’ agent at Klutch Sports, relayed that his client is looking for a place where he can “win consistently and compete for a championship.”

New Orleans Pelicans head coach Alvin Gentry says he has already spoken with Davis, who has no plans to sit out and will honor his contract. Remember –the All-Star forward is not a free agent until the summer of 2020.

Before we get into the whole ordeal of how things got to this point and what’s to come, let’s get one thing straight—this isn’t just any other player. This is Anthony Davis.

Davis is a walking double-double that can post whatever stat line he pleases any night he steps foot onto a basketball court. He is a monster presence in the paint with top-tier shot-blocking ability and is an undeniable force on the offensive end — a franchise changer.

Any team would be incredibly fortunate to acquire Davis. The most popular destination in probably everyone’s minds would be the Los Angeles Lakers.

LeBron James and Paul are the top dogs in Klutch Sports, an agency that lured Davis in this past September. The King has been rumored to be asking for another superstar to play with in Hollywood. It just makes too much sense. And don’t get it twisted, this report came out as a “tick-tock” move to get the wheels turning on preparing a deal – a major reason the Pelicans want a close eye on those all so familiar tampering rules.

But who’s to say Los Angeles has enough to offer?

According to Yahoo Sports reporter Chris Haynes, the New York Knicks are preparing to make an offer for Davis, as they have plenty of assets to construct a trade with. May they be willing to part ways with a dissatisfied Kristaps Porzingis? Would Kevin Knox or a first-round pick suffice?

These are valid questions, but is this really a team that will win consistently, as Davis supposedly prefers? It’s certainly a top market, however, that winning part of it isn’t happening unless New York can find another superstar-caliber talent in the offseason. Regardless, though, Davis reportedly would be willing to sign his extension in the Big Apple, which is surprising considering the state of the team currently.

The Boston Celtics have been linked to Davis for the past several years, but can’t legally trade for him until July 1 due to the Designated Rookie Extension Contract rule in the CBA, which states that a team can’t have two players on such a deal together. Kyrie Irving will become an unrestricted free agent on that date.

Earlier in the season, the Golden State Warriors were mentioned as a potential destination for Davis, but let’s not kid ourselves—they don’t have the assets to make that happen. Unless there’s a crazy swap of epic proportions with Kevin Durant or something, don’t count on it.

We could speculate from dusk ‘til dawn if we wanted to on this matter. Here’s what this reporter sees happening: Nothing.

Ask yourself this question: If you’re the Pelicans, why would you deal Davis right now? Again, this is not the final year of his deal.

As far as we know, he’s not somebody that will make a big fuss out of the situation. Usually, a disgruntled superstar in a locker room who knows of his intentions isn’t good, but Davis doesn’t seem like he’d be that type of player to disrupt things. If he’s going to be professional about it, then what’s the rush?

In all honesty, when healthy, the Pelicans are a good team. Julius Randle is boasting some loud numbers in a career-season and what will likely act as a contract year. Jrue Holiday continues to be sensational, averaging over 20 points and more than eight assists per game for the first time in his career. They have not been able to bring in a wing to complete the puzzle, yet playing smaller has worked on the offensive end.

So who or what do you point the finger at for not putting it all together? To be frank—the injury bug, for the most part.

New Orleans has been banged up almost all year long. After a fast start, they lost Elfrid Payton for two months. Between an ankle injury and a recent calf strain, Nikola Mirotic has been nicked up. Solomon Hill has missed a chunk of games. Even Davis, who is currently dealing with a left finger issue, is a part of these setbacks.

As Bleacher Report’s Preston Ellis points out, all but one of the Pels’ top five-man lineups in net rating has played fewer than 71 minutes together. That’s a shame considering how hot the team started to open the season.

The front office could’ve tried to go after a proven small forward to shore up the defensive end, with size lacking in positions one through three. Players like Trevor Ariza or Robert Covington, just as examples, might’ve made a huge difference. With that said, though, it’s not as if general manager Dell Demps hasn’t made an attempt to surround Davis with talent.

Around this time two years ago, Demps pushed all of his chips to the center of the table. He traded Tyreke Evans, Langston Galloway, then-rookie Buddy Hield and a 2017 first-rounder for Omri Casspi and All-Star big man DeMarcus Cousins. New Orleans didn’t make the postseason that year, but Boogie and The Brow became a revelation.

The Pels had a legitimate big three and veteran leadership the following season. While they had their ups and downs throughout the course of the campaign, January 2018 was a hot month. Having just ripped off seven wins in eight games, Cousins tragically suffered a torn Achilles in the closing moments of the team’s victory over the Houston Rockets. He’d be ruled out for the rest of the way, never to be seen in a NOLA uniform again.

Demps once again made it a point to not give up after taking a huge hit, so he acquired Mirotic to soften the blow and bolster the roster once more. It paid off right away.

New Orleans fought valiantly in Cousins’ absence and, behind the brilliance of Davis, Holiday, Mirotic and Rajon Rondo, made it to the second round of the NBA Playoffs before getting eliminated by the Warriors in five games.

Despite losing Cousins to that Golden State squad, the offense has actually improved statistically since then. The quick, up-and-down pace of the Pels’ has worked well with the personnel on the roster. It’s kind of ironic considering they’ve had two Defensive Player of the Year candidates for the past few years, but the glaring problem is on the defensive end, where they are often outmatched and unable to contain the corner three.

Davis’ timing with this announcement is not surprising because the season has quickly gone into a downward spiral. New Orleans sports a record of 22-28. They’re seven-and-a-half games back from first place in the Southwest Division and six-and-a-half games back from the eighth-seeded LA Clippers in an ultra-competitive Western Conference.

It’ll be intriguing to see whether the Pels decide to strike the iron while it’s hot or if they wait regarding a Davis deal. Reports are indicating they’ll be working on their own time and even the team’s latest statement confirms there will be no rush on jettisoning The Brow out of town.

It’s a shame that things will end like this, be it this season or next—especially with the poor luck NOLA has had on the injury front—however, it’s not all that unexpected. Arranged marriages between players and teams don’t always work out long-term anymore. It’s becoming more and more common for athletes to look out for themselves above all else. Some guys prefer the bright lights and big city, others want to win championships.

Based on what has been put out there, it sounds like Davis wants the best of both of those worlds. Unfortunately for him, he might have to wait until after the season for that to happen.

But if New Orleans does the opposite and finds a can’t-miss deal, then there will obviously be no choice. On the condition it happens, the organization would probably be throwing in the proverbial white towel on the year. Zach Lowe of ESPN reported that they have made Randle, Mirotic and E’Twaun Moore all available for picks.

Still, in the meantime, the Pels should keep playing Davis the way they have been. Nobody’s holding anybody hostage.

Just as players have to go by their feelings, teams have to look out for themselves, too. They can’t just give in to demands if it’s going to negatively affect what they’re trying to accomplish.

The Pels are down, but not out of the postseason race yet and Davis is an MVP candidate. If the deadline passes without agreeing to a deal, then they can treat this as if it never happened until the final buzzer sounds on their season.

Spencer Davies is an Senior NBA Writer based in Cleveland in his third year with Basketball Insiders. Covering the league and the Cavaliers for the past four seasons, his bylines have appeared on Bleacher Report, FOX Sports and HoopsHype.

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NBA Daily: Biggest Losers On Draft Night

With another year in the books, James Blancarte looks at the 2019 NBA Draft’s biggest losers.

James Blancarte

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For months it has been accepted that Zion Williamson would be the number one draft pick. Ja Morant and R.J. Barrett were also drafted at two and three as expected. What transpired after that was much less expected, including a few major surprises along the way. There had been rumors leading up to the draft that the New Orleans Pelicans, in possession of the number four pick after agreeing to terms with the Los Angeles Lakers in the Anthony Davis trade, would be looking to move the pick.

The 2019 NBA Draft is now in the books and we can take a step back and evaluate how things unfolded. Take a look at Ben Nadeau’s analysis as to who the big winners on draft night were. Whether any selected player lives up to expectations or is ultimately successful is something that can take years to determine. But, for now, let’s take a look at some who may have not had the best night.

The Phoenix Suns

The Suns started draft day by dumping forward T.J. Warren to the Indiana Pacers to be rid of the remaining three years on his contract while sending the Suns’ number 32 pick to help complete the trade. The frustrating issue here is Warren is in his mid-twenties, is productive, doesn’t have a toxic contract and can be very useful on a contending team. In another trade, the Suns moved down, sending the number six pick to the Minnesota Timberwolves for power forward Dario Saric and the 11th pick. Saric is a useful player on offense and a good fit on the Suns who is now another player on the roster who will likely contribute to the team’s defensive woes. Also, moving Warren seemed to be about clearing cap space so the Suns could go after a player like D’Angelo Russell. However, taking on Saric’s contract cut into that strategy.

With the 11th pick, the Suns selected Cameron Johnson, a sweet shooting forward who figures to slot in extremely well as a compliment to franchise cornerstones Devin Booker and DeAndre Ayton, who both require the ball in their hands frequently to be successful. This pick shocked many including Johnson’s own teammate, Coby White, who displayed shock and enthusiasm for his teammate’s unexpectedly high selection. The issue for the Suns is that Johnson is an older prospect who is somewhat limited beyond his outside shooting, has had hip issues, which could be an indicator that he will have trouble staying healthy and he doesn’t have the same potential upside as other players in the draft.

Many projections had Johnson going as low as early in the second round. Imagine if the Suns could have had Johnson at their original 32nd pick. The Suns also traded a 2020 first-round pick (acquired from Milwaukee) to Boston to obtain the number 24 pick to get Ty Jerome and center Aron Baynes. The biggest and most puzzling part of this trade is that it cost the Suns much of the cap space they just cleared, presumably for Russell. For these moves to really pay off going forward, the Suns will need to maximize the cap space freed up in the Warren trade (and then somewhat given up) and find a way to shore up a team that sorely needs better point guard play and is weak on the defensive end. On a day that saw the Suns give up so much and saw so many other players go far below their projections, this day may sting for a while.

Cleveland Cavaliers

The Cleveland Cavaliers also came into the draft with a high pick but, like the Suns, they were moved down a couple of spots in the draft lottery and were bumped out of the top three. Just before the draft, there was chatter about the Cavaliers moving out of the fifth pick in a possible trade. Ultimately, with the Hawks jumping up to take De’Andre Hunter at four, the Cavaliers selected Darius Garland, after he had been slotted at fourth in many mock drafts.

A talented shooter and isolation-based scorer, Garland has a high potential ceiling due to his offensive capabilities. The issue is team fit. The Cavaliers are still rebuilding following LeBron James’s departure and until draft day only had one foundational talent in Collin Sexton. Garland and Sexton will likely occupy much of the same space on offense and don’t complement each other based on their preferred style of play.

Garland is a good player and the Cavaliers can still make this work but considering the value that other teams were able to extract for moving down in the draft (see Pelicans; not the Suns), it is a shame that the Cavaliers didn’t use the opportunity to move down and possibly add additional assets in a trade or perhaps select a better fitting prospect.

Bol Bol

Being drafted in the NBA is a blessing. Period. Of course, expectations are relative and being drafted lower than is widely expected is disappointing. Going lower also comes with fewer contractual guarantees and decreased pay. Bol Bol might still have a productive career but many projected him as a possible lottery pick or at least a late first-rounder. Conversations about Bol leading up the draft did not appear positive and his stock seemed to be falling. Even still, Bol slipping to 44 to Denver still came as a shock. Of all players in attendance, Bol was also the last person to be selected. By the time his name was called, he left his table and awaited off stage, still hoping to be drafted.

Without immediate pressure or need to play him in Denver, Bol should have the time he needs to focus on any health issues and develop physically. It is possible that his foot and possible knee issues are worse than is widely reported. Perhaps issues with his durability, extremely light frame and potential for re-injury outweighed the shot blocking, shooting and offensive creativity Bol displayed in his one injury-shortened season in Oregon.

Many other players went far below their projections. Nassir Little fell to the Portland Trail Blazers, which is actually a favorable fit for him. Tacko Fall fell out of the draft, although there have always been limitations to his game that made him a more limited prospect. Still, Bol’s drop stood out as one of the top stories. While the odds are against players drafted this low, Bol could make news again should he succeed and prove doubters wrong.

 

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NBA Daily: Biggest Winners On Draft Night

With another year in the books, Ben Nadeau looks at the 2019 NBA Draft’s biggest winners — go get that money, Cam!

Ben Nadeau

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As usual, chaos reigned supreme during Thursday’s NBA Draft, an annual tradition like no other. Spearheaded by pre-draft trades involving Anthony Davis, Mike Conley Jr. and a number of smaller-sided deals, a rambunctious amount of league-wide movement went down in Brooklyn this week. After the all-but-announced business involving Zion Williamson, Ja Morant and RJ Barrett had been decided, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Pheonix Suns helped to push the draft into an early frenzy — so, from there on out, matters only continued to rise. The New Orleans Pelicans used their freshly-replenished haul of draft picks to add even more depth to a young, athletic roster, while multiple surprises kept much of first 30 choices shrouded in mystery.

But when the dust settled at the Barclays Center, a few teams had notably come out on top. Whether by sticking to their front office guns or just simply reading the room, there can be no doubt that these franchises bettered themselves for both the present and the oncoming future.

New Orleans Pelicans

Now That’s What I Call Rebuilding A Franchise, Vol. 19! David Griffin, the recently-hired Executive Vice President of Basketball Operations for the Pelicans, has absolutely smashed his opening months in charge. Anthony Davis’ trade deadline value had been torpedoed by that infamous public trade request — and doubled-down upon in June by Rich Paul’s insistence that his client would end up in Los Angeles — but that didn’t stop Griffin from squeezing every possible ounce of profit from the desperate Lakers. Lonzo Ball and Brandon Ingram were quality centerpieces, but Josh Hart, Jaxson Hayes and Nickeil Alexander-Walker will factor in for years to come too. Naturally, that list doesn’t even include the trove of future draft picks that they received too

Billy King, unofficially, you are off the hook.

If that weren’t enough, Griffin also ditched the final year of Solomon Hill’s contract, a move that’ll put the Pelicans in prime position to chase a key free agent. For a franchise that looked stuck between a rock and hard place four months ago, it’s far more likely that New Orleans reaches the playoffs instead of the lottery next season. In short, even if the Pelicans weren’t your secret second favorite team, they probably are now.

Cleveland Cavaliers

There were no insane deals for Cleveland this year, nor did they have to worry about placating a nearly decided-upon LeBron James either. Now firmly entrenched in year two of their unanticipated rebuild, a palpable shape is starting to take form for the Cavaliers. Sure, Darius Garland and Collin Sexton play the same position — but that’s something for John Beilein, Cleveland’s shiny, new hire at head coach — to figure out. Joined by the excellent 1-2 scoring punch of Dylan Windler and Kevin Porter Jr. to finish out the night, the Cavaliers snagged plenty of ceilingless shooting potential. Although they’re likely to see at least one more lottery appearance, there’s plenty to be excited about in the Midwest — with or without a deep postseason run ahead of them.

Brooklyn Nets

Since Sean Marks was hired as the Nets’ general manager, he’s drafted exceptionally well — particularly for a franchise that didn’t hold their own first round pick for half a decade. Caris LeVert (No. 20), Jarrett Allen (No. 22) and Rodions Kurucs (No. 40) all seem like tent-pole contributors for Brooklyn — so the Nets, who once had two first-rounders in 2019, believe it or not, traded both of them away. With the Kyrie Irving gaining serious steam lately, Marks and the front office needed to keep the roster lean for a second max free agent — unfortunately, that came at the expense of those pesky guaranteed first-round deals. Brooklyn didn’t come away empty-handed, however, as the green room-invited Nic Claxton and late-round draftee Jaylen Hands are intriguing in their own ways — but their biggest prize remains that flexibility.

If the league has learned anything over the last four years, it should be that the Nets don’t willingly toss aside draft picks, especially with their sturdy track record. Whether or not Brooklyn lands some combination of Kevin Durant or Irving in July remains to be seen — but this marked a warning shot to the other 29 franchises: The Nets are back.

Atlanta Hawks

While the Luka Dončić-Trae Young debate is set to rage on until the end of time, it’s safe to say that the Hawks have crucially navigated their rebuild nonetheless. Flipping Nos. 8 and 17 — the former coming via the Allen Crabbe deal — with New Orleans to move up for De’Andre Hunter was shrewd business, but using the No. 10 overall selection, the extra asset from the aforementioned Mavericks trade, to collect Cam Reddish might be the cherry on top. Very suddenly, the Hawks have collected an entirely new starting five in just under three years. Additionally armed with Kevin Heurter, John Collins and Young — three of the league’s brightest breakout stars in 2018-19 — that core, somehow, got even better.

At No. 4, Hunter is a versatile, two-way standout that’ll protect Young on defense and shoulder some offensive millage for Heurter as well. In an alternative collegiate dimension, Reddish could’ve been a bonafide star — instead, he falls perfectly into the lap of Atlanta. Any franchise thinking about hitting the reset button should carefully study the Hawks — it’s early, but the signs are extremely positive.

New York Knicks

The Knicks are included on this list of winners precisely for Not Messing That Up™ — at long last, RJ Barrett is the new king of New York. Throughout the springtime, Barrett was merely considered a consolation prize compared to the real-deal main courses in Zion Williamson and Ja Morant — same, consequently, for whichever team ended up at No. 3 overall. Even if that many-times-rebuffed draft narrative comes true, Barrett was still the easy call for the Knicks to make. As if a sight for sore eyes, New York-area fans actually celebrated their latest first-round selection — a facet that hasn’t happened frequently as of late. But for everybody else, it was just refreshing not to see the always-struggling franchise not outthink itself for once.

The former Blue Devil averaged 22.6 points and 7.6 rebounds on 52.9 percent from the field and, in all likelihood, this will be his team from day one.  Now paired with Kevin Knox, Mitchell Robinson and Dennis Smith Jr., the newly-drafted Barrett and the Knicks may finally be on the path to something bigger and brighter.

Cameron Johnson

One of the most-puzzling moves of the night came at the expense of the Phoenix Suns, a team so badly in need of above-average defense that they moved down from No. 6 to No. 11 in exchange for Dario Saric. To slightly compound matters, the Suns then grabbed Cameron Johnson, an excellent shooter that was projected as a mid-to-late pick in the first round. Pundits have since crushed the choice — Jarrett Culver, a solid two-way player, slid to their original selection — but the Suns clearly saw something they loved in Johnson.

All that aside, the former Tar Heel just got much, much richer on behalf of the Suns.

If Johnson had fallen a little closer to his mocked-out range — let’s say to the Philadelphia 76ers at No. 24 overall, just as an example — his initial salary would’ve been a paltry downgrade. Of course, salary cap numbers differ year-to-year but the Trail Blazers’ Anfernee Simons went No. 24 in 2018 and was paid about $1.8 million during his rookie season. Simons will earn $2.1 million in 2019-20, plus $2.2 and $3.9 million over the following two years should Portland continue to pick up his team options ahead of restricted free agency.

So, across his first four NBA seasons, Simons will earn roughly $10.2 million — whereas Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, last year’s No. 11 overall pick, will take home close to $17 million on the same type of structured deal. For a 23-year-old like Johnson that was supposed to land closer to the second round than the lottery a week ago, that’s a significant financial windfall. Even if he doesn’t end up proving all his doubters wrong, he will, at the very least, be paid far more handsomely for his efforts.

From franchises that are looking to stockpile talented youngsters to those readying themselves for the hectic free agency period, most did fairly well during the 2019 NBA Draft. But in this world, there are always winners and losers — and, in this iteration, Cameron Johnson may be the biggest victor of them all.

So congratulations to Johnson on the major pay raise and best wishes to the rest of this promising class as well — October can’t come soon enough.

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2019 NBA Draft Trade Recap

Drew Maresca revisits a crazy night of trades during the 2019 NBA Draft and offers his analysis on the moves.

Drew Maresca

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The 2019 NBA Draft started off with more trade activity than expected as most experts even predicted a record-breaking night as far as trades were concerned. With many big-name stars on the move pre-draft, rumors galore and the pending free agency period, all 30 teams were looking to maneuver in a way that best suited their current course of action. But when the dust eventually settled, the final count ended at an above-average total of 12 draft night trades. Here is a comprehensive list of all of the deals agreed to on draft night.

Atlanta: Acquired the fourth overall pick from New Orleans and selected De’Andre Hunter, along with the 57th overall pick (Jordan Bone) a future second-round pick and Solomon Hill

New Orleans: Traded down for the eighth (Jaxon Hayes), 17th (Nickeil Alexander-Walker) and 35th overall picks (Marcos Louzada Silva), as well as a protected 2020 first-round pick (via Cleveland).

This move clearly benefits the Hawks by sending them a top-tier talent. Hunter gives Atlanta a talented two-way player who is a capable shooter and defender. He will join Trae Young, John Collins and Kevin Huerter and Cam Reddish on a strong, young team, thus speeding up the timeline on the rebuild significantly.

Hunter, the centerpiece of the trade, is an elite 3-and-D guy. He should have an immediate impact on the Hawks given his length and noteworthy defensive versatility.

Elsewhere, the Pelicans were able to net two prospects that they like while clearing Hill’s salary, freeing up significant salary cap space immediately. They felt that they didn’t have to make the fourth selection considering they drafted Zion Williamson with the first overall pick minutes earlier.

Additionally, the Pelicans may also consider packaging a number of their 2019 draft picks for an established star or, perhaps, even sign one outright thanks to their new, lighter salary cap situation.

Minnesota: Acquired the sixth overall pick (Jarrett Culver)

Phoenix: Traded down for Dario Saric and the 11th overall pick (Cameron Johnson)

The Timberwolves clearly had eyes for Culver — and why wouldn’t they? Culver is a solid player that can score in bunches. He prides himself on his defensive abilities and projects well as a complete player who can help a team without requiring too many touches.

The Suns were obviously enamored with Saric, that much is clear. Ultimately, their selection of Johnson is a bit puzzling considering his injury history (hips), age (23) and where he was rated as a prospect (widely-viewed as a late first-rounder at the earliest); but the Suns clearly saw something. Maybe the Suns thought they had enough backcourt assets with Devin Booker and Mikal Bridges — typically, however, when a young team has an opportunity to draft a player like Culver, they capitalize on it.

Philadelphia: Acquired the 20th overall pick (Matisse Thybulle).

Boston: Traded back for the 24th (Ty Jerome) and 33rd (Carsen Edwards) overall picks

*Jerome was later traded to Phoenix along with Aaron Baynes for a 2020 first-round pick (via Milwaukee).

The Celtics were clearly not overly-sold on any prospects available in the 20-24 range. During the draft, allegedly, Boston was hoping to consolidate picks and move up. And when that didn’t come to fruition, they had to decide if they really wanted to bring on so many rookies.

Philadelphia potentially acquired the best perimeter defender in the draft in Thybulle. There were rumors they were interested in Nassir Little and Kevin Porter Jr., but they pounced when they realized Thybulle was available — in turn, the 76ers received an immediate impact player.

Phoenix’s acquisition of Jerome makes sense. Jerome is a 6-foot-5 point guard that shot over 40 percent from three-point range in his three-year career at Virginia — and the Suns, of course, are in need of a point guard. He distributes the ball well for a combo guard, but can he develop in as a true point guard? The Suns will hope so.

Further, giving up the 2020 Milwaukee pick after trading away the sixth overall pick was curious. Presumably, the Suns figured that Giannis Antetokounmpo stays in Milwaukee, the Bucks remain dominant in the Eastern Conference and that 2020 first-round pick turns out to be lower than 24.

Memphis: Acquired the 21st overall pick (via Utah) and selected Brandon Clarke

Oklahoma City: Traded down to the 23rd overall pick and selected Darius Bazley

The Grizzlies added Clarke to their young core, which also includes rookie phenom Ja Morant and the promising Jaren Jackson Jr. They should grow together nicely and Clarke’s extreme athleticism should fit perfectly with Morant. Clarke is also an elite defender, which means that the Grizzlies now have two potential defensive stoppers in him and Jackson Jr. Clarke is a relatively-high IQ guy that is poised and deliberate — on the court and in his interactions with the media — which usually bodes well for both the player and the team.

For the Thunder, this deal was all about savings. Oklahoma City is well over the salary cap and trying to mitigate spending as much as possible. While trading away Clarke hurts, it’s a means to an end.

Los Angeles Clippers: Acquired the 27th overall pick and selected Mfiondu Kabengele

Brooklyn: Received a future first-round pick (via Philadelphia) and the 56th overall pick (Jaylen Hands)

The Nets did not want to add any guaranteed salary given their pursuit of two max salary cap slots, hence the trade of another first-round pick.

And while the Clippers are also seeking two max slots, they are far enough below the cap that the 27th pick doesn’t hurt their pursuit of cap space.

Hands is an explosive point guard and an above-average defender. He uses his above-average quickness effectively and possesses an NBA-level shooting range. On the other end, Kabengele just adds to the Clippers’ young core, a shrewd pick-up that just won his conference’s Sixth Man of the Year award in 2018-19 — think Los Angeles could use another player like that?

You betcha.

Cleveland: Acquired the 30th overall pick (Kevin Porter Jr.)

Detroit: Received four future second-round picks and cash considerations

Not including Bol Bol, Porter Jr. probably had the biggest drop of all the top prospects. But he was ultimately selected with the last pick in the first round due to the Cavaliers trading up. He’s viewed as a steal at No. 30 at this point in time, rightfully so given his raw potential. Still, there are maturity concerns regarding Porter Jr. that must be addressed. He will likely be given room to grown and learn on the fly in Cleveland, but he must make good decisions both on and off the court. 29 teams passed on Porter Jr., so it’s up to him to prove them wrong.

And if Detroit is among the teams that had doubts about Porter Jr., they received a fair amount of compensation for the right to pick him — future second-rounders and $5 million in case. Could Porter Jr. have helped Detroit? Possibly. But given the doubts around him, the Pistons made a prudent decision.

Washington: Acquired Jonathan Simmons and the 42nd overall pick (Admiral Schofield).

Philadelphia: Received cash considerations

The 76ers clearly wanted to move Simmons. They traded away the rights to Admiral Schofield to get out of Simmons’ contract, which helps free up additional salary cap space — the 76ers are rumored to be interested in offering Tobias Harris and Jimmy Butler max deals come free agency — and they need all the space the can get.

The Wizards, on the other hand, are stuck between rebuilding and competing — although competing seems challenging given the John Wall injury history and contract. So if trading for a player whose deal expires following the 2019-20 season is the cost to bring on Schofield, that’s a penalty the Wizards were willing to incur.

Schofield is a good shooter and scores well in the post. He projects to be similar to Jae Crowder, assuming all works out well for him. As a competitive gamer, Schofield will help the Wizards immediately on the offensive end. He’s likely to give up some height on defense, given that he’s a small forward — however, his grit and athleticism should help him keep pace.

Miami: Acquired the 32nd overall pick (KZ Okpala)

Suns: Received three future second-round picks

KZ Okpala projects to be similar to Rodney Hood, which is clearly not a bad thing given how Hood played in the 2019 NBA Playoffs. Okpala is super athletic and has good measurements of 6-foot-8 and 195 lbs. He can run the floor, handle the ball and is an above-average shot-maker. He needs to improve a bit defensively, but Miami will work with him on this.

The Suns could have used Okapala, as could most teams. But at the same time, three second-round picks can be a pretty big haul too. And the Suns, like many other teams selling second-rounders, already have their share of youth, which presents unique challenges.

Denver: Acquired the 44th overall pick (Bol Bol)

Miami: Received a future second-round pick and cash considerations

Bol Bol was projected as high as the lottery — but his night did not pan out how he would’ve liked. Nevertheless, any time a team identifies a prospect as someone of interest, that prospect should be thankful.

Bol was always going to be a risky selection given his foot injury, his extremely slim build and his surprisingly-high body fat percentage. Still, Bol Bol offers skills not previously seen in a player his size. He shoots incredibly well from three-point range and can grow into an above-average shot blocker. And given the Nuggets’ depth, they can bring him along slowly. Their player development team has their hands full with a guy whose drive and desire have been questioned — but the upside is not in doubt.

Los Angeles Lakers: Acquired the 46th overall pick (Talen Horton-Tucker)

Orlando: Received cash considerations

This move was a must-have for the Lakers, who are in need of cheap talent. If Los Angeles is serious about chasing a third max free agent, Horton-Tucker is solid fit — both rotationally and financially.

Horton-Tucker is a strong guard who boasts a ridiculous 7-foot-1 wingspan (considering he’s only 6-foot-4). He can defend both guard positions, allowing him to have an immediate impact if need be. Further, he doesn’t turn 19 years-old until November, which means he has more time than most to mature and develop.

The Magic were clearly more interested in the cash than they were in on-boarding another rookie.

Golden State: Received the 39th overall pick (Alen Smailagic)

New Orleans: Received two future second-round picks and cash considerations 

Smailagic is an 18 -year-old shooter from Serbia that the Warriors monitored/hid in the G League last season as he was too young and ineligible for the NBA Draft. He was kept away from most showcases last year and the Warriors cashed in on draft night. He averaged 9.1 points last season for the Santa Cruz Warriors.

The Pelicans, on the other hand, are already committed to developing four rookies. In the end, they did not need a fifth, especially considering the number of other young players who still need guidance, too — e.g., Brandon Ingram and Lonzo Ball.

Detroit: Acquired the 57th overall pick (Jordan Bone) 

New Orleans: Received cash considerations

Jordan Bone took a chance after relatively-disappointing freshmen and sophomore seasons with Tennessee. It paid off when Detroit traded for the 57th overall pick, using it to select Bone. The speedy guard averaged 16.3 points and 7.1 assists per game last season for the Volunteers. Bone led the third-most efficient offense in the country last year, which bodes well for a player who will likely struggle to find a spot immediately.

As far as the Pelicans are concerned, it makes sense that they would trade away the 57th overall pick considering they traded away the 39th too.

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