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NBA PM: A Sneak Peek At The Charlotte Hornets

The Hornets acquired Dwight Howard this offseason. Buddy Grizzard analyzes Charlotte’s roster and how Howard might fit in.

Buddy Grizzard

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The Charlotte Hornets made a huge gamble this offseason by trading for Dwight Howard, a polarizing player who has departed every NBA franchise he’s played for under a cloud of controversy. The Hornets easily won the trade with the Atlanta Hawks, as removing the three years and $37.5 million guaranteed left for the unproductive Miles Plumlee was a win in and of itself.

However, recent comments by Howard indicate that he believes reuniting with coach Steve Clifford in Charlotte will give him an opportunity to recapture past glory. Hornets beat writer Rick Bonnell of the Charlotte Observer apparently feels it’s a foregone conclusion that Howard will replace incumbent Cody Zeller as the team’s starting center. But is that the best idea?

The Hornets were 33-29 when Zeller played but just 3-17 without him. Had Charlotte maintained the same .53 win percentage with Zeller absent, the team would have won seven or eight more games, possibly reaching the fifth seed in the East. Zeller also joined Kemba Walker as the two greatest difference makers on the Hornets’ roster. Zeller’s +5.4 net rating led the team, just ahead of Walker’s +3.6. The team was 10.6 points per 100 possessions better with Walker on court compared to off, and +9 in net rating differential for Zeller. Their nearest teammate in net differential was Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (+3.3).

As we gear up for the 2017-18 NBA season, we dig into the Hornets’ roster, one of the teams expected to make a move in the weakened Eastern Conference. Players are listed in descending order of salary for this season.

Dwight Howard, $23.4 million

“I haven’t had a system where I can be who I am since I was in Orlando,” Howard told Adrian Wojnarowski for an ESPN piece published Friday. “I’ve been in this system before, and I know how dominant I can be.”

Howard was referring to the similarities between Clifford’s system in Charlotte and the system Stan Van Gundy ran in Orlando when Clifford was an assistant. The biggest take away from Howard’s comments, however, is that he’s not looking to age gracefully in a more supportive role. He’s still looking to turn back the clock and sees the Hornets as a vehicle for that end.

On the plus side for Charlotte, both Kemba Walker and Nicolas Batum are better at executing the pick and roll than Dennis Schroder, the starting point guard for last season’s Hawks. Howard scores a supremely-efficient 1.2 points per possession as the roll man in pick and rolls but used fewer than 100 such possessions last season. It’s unclear if this resulted from a lack of proficiency in executing the pick and roll by Schroder or resistance from Howard to making the play a staple of his offense.

If Howard still believes that most of his offense should come from post isolation, it will be a bad sign for Charlotte. Howard scores about 50 percent fewer points per possession in post isolation than he does as a roll man. Year after year, Howard remains among the NBA’s least efficient post scorers.

Nicolas Batum, $23.4 million

Batum is a natural small forward, but so are Marvin Williams and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, both of whom join Batum among Charlotte’s four highest-paid players. Williams has morphed into a stretch power forward since joining the Hornets while Batum starts at shooting guard, Charlotte’s position of least depth. Aside from Batum, the only other experienced shooting guard on the roster is Jeremy Lamb, whose issues we’ll discuss below. The Hornets paid a hefty price to steal Batum from the Trail Blazers. His ability to stretch the floor and set up Howard will be huge keys to determine if the new lineup can be a success.

Marvin Williams, $13.1 million

Williams has been a reliable shooter and defender for Charlotte, but his -0.5 net rating last season was worse than every Hornet to play at least 800 minutes except Lamb (-1.1) and the departed Ramon Sessions (-4.8). It will be critical for Williams to remain consistent as a three-point shooter if Howard does indeed replace Zeller as the starting center. Zeller is a more dynamic offensive player while Howard typically remains glued to the paint. The more Williams can continue to stretch the floor, the more it will insulate Charlotte from the spacing issues that significant minutes from Howard will generate.

Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, $13 million

Perhaps the most concerning aspect of adding Howard to the Hornets’ starting lineup is the prospect of pairing him for significant minutes with Kidd-Gilchrist, another non-shooter. Even if Walker, Batum and Williams remain steady contributors from the three-point line, there will be major spacing issues any time Howard and Kidd-Gilchrist share the floor. MKG is among the better defensive small forwards in the league, but his presence will make it impossible for Charlotte to deploy the type of four-out lineups Howard became accustomed to in Orlando. Look for Kidd-Gilchrist to play increased minutes with the second unit alongside Zeller. You may also see Williams play increased minutes at small forward with Frank Kaminsky standing in as the fourth shooter in lineups with Howard.

Cody Zeller, $12.5

Zeller, after battling injuries, became one of the breakout players from the last NBA season. No Hornet will have to sacrifice more if Howard is to receive the increased offensive role he’s seeking. The biggest question is, if inserting Howard as a starter doesn’t lead to wins, will the chemistry fracture if he’s asked to swap places and allow Zeller to resume his role as a starter?

Kemba Walker, $12 million

That Walker, an All-Star, has only the sixth-highest salary for Charlotte shows what a massive bargain he is, especially with two guaranteed years left on the deal. Walker is the Hornets’ engine and it will be on him to make new lineups work. Charlotte should have improved depth at point guard so, ideally, Walker won’t be counted on to shoulder quite as heavy a minutes load as last season.

Jeremy Lamb, $7 million

Among the nine Hornets to play at least 800 minutes last season, Lamb had the second-worst net rating. The former first round pick for the Houston Rockets has had a disappointing career to date but will be among the keys for Charlotte to improve this season. He’s the only natural shooting guard on the roster with the size to guard larger wings, if you accept that Batum is a natural small forward. Lamb posted a career-best 17 PER last year, well above the league average of 15, and it has trended up every season. However, Lamb shot a career-low 28 percent from three. The Hornets will hope for a bounce-back shooting season from Lamb, which, combined with his excellent rebounding for his position, would translate to a huge boost for Charlotte.

Malik Monk, $2.9 million

According to Cole Zwicker of NetScouts, Malik Monk was the most efficient college freshman on shots off the dribble since 2006, posting a spectacular 1.01 points per possession. However, Monk remains a mystery since we haven’t seen what he’ll be able to do against NBA defenses. Can he handle well enough to spend minutes as a backup point guard? Can he defend well enough to spend significant minutes at shooting guard despite his under-developed, 6-foot-3 frame? These are questions that remain to be answered, and we were denied a sneak peek since he was sidelined during NBA Summer League due to injury. Monk could end up the steal of the draft or he could struggle to find a position in the NBA. His range of outcomes is very wide, and the Hornets will need that outcome to be positive to bolster the team’s efforts to join the contenders in the East.

Frank Kaminsky, $2.8 million

Kaminsky was one of only five Hornets to post a positive net rating last season among players with at least 800 minutes. As mentioned, his outside shooting will take on a greater importance this season with Howard’s arrival impacting the team’s spacing. Kaminsky has shot 33 percent for his career from three, which is below league average but still good for a big man. If he can improve on that percentage while also improving his rebounding (4.5 per game last season) and maintaining something close to the 11.7 points per game he scored last season, he will remain an integral part of Charlotte’s rotation and a bargain as he is still on his rookie deal.

Michael Carter-Williams, $2.7 million

MCW was a good get for Charlotte on a one-year deal at $2.7 million, but his lack of shooting makes this move a question mark, given the new team dynamics. In an ideal scenario for the Hornets, Carter-Williams could spend minutes in the backcourt with Monk where his size allows him to guard larger wings. The ball will be safer in Carter-Williams’ hands on offense than Monk’s, and the presence of Zeller with the second unit could lead to vastly-improved depth. That’s if everything works out the way it’s supposed to. If any of Charlotte’s pieces stray off script, it could prevent the team from reaching its full potential.

Aside from Carter-Williams, Shams Charania of The Vertical is reporting that the Hornets are expected to sign point guard Julyan Stone if he’s able to receive clearance from FIBA. Stone is 6-foot-7 and could also bolster the team’s wing depth. And the team has also signed second round pick Dwayne Bacon — who has received comparisons to Joe Johnson — to a minimum deal. Bacon looked excellent in Summer League, leading the Hornets with 15.7 points per game, including 29 in the finale against Orlando

The Hornets have a brutal November schedule, with a stretch starting Nov. 10 that includes games in Boston, Chicago, Cleveland and Toronto, interspersed with home games against the Clippers, Timberwolves, Wizards and Spurs. That means Charlotte will have to figure things out right away. There won’t be a light early schedule to ease Howard into the rotation, so we should know before the year is out if adding him was the right move.

Buddy Grizzard has written for ESPN.com and BBallBreakdown and served as an editor for ESPN TrueHoop Network.

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NBA Daily: Fixing the Denver Nuggets

Following a surprisingly successful postseason run, the Nuggets are off to a relatively slow start. Drew Maresca examines what’s going on in Denver in the latest edition of Basketball Insiders’ “Fixing” series.

Drew Maresca

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The Denver Nuggets have been on the rise for a while, but it all came together for them last season. If they weren’t already on your radar, a postseason that included two come-from-behind series wins should guarantee that they are now.

The Nuggets finished the 2019-20 season with a record of 46-27 and advanced to the Western Conference Finals where they lost to the eventual NBA champion Los Angeles Lakers. Along the way, Nikola Jokic proved that he’s one of the best players in the league, while they also received a significant boost from the rising star Jamal Murray, who scored 30 or more points in six of the team’s 19 postseasons games. Michael Porter Jr. also proved his back is just fine after a serious pre-draft injury and that he’s a real threat in the NBA. So what’s there to fix?

Well, the Nuggets are off to an uninspiring start. They are currently 6-6, good for just seventh in the Western Conference. While they’re supremely talented, they must get back on track – otherwise, the team could be in for a long 2020-21 offseason.

What’s Working

Denver’s offense is still effective. Entering play last night, they were scoring 116.5 points per game, good for fifth in the NBA. They draw a lot of fouls, too – 22.3 per game to be exact – which is tied for first in the entire league. So, that’s a start.

Jokic, meanwhile, is still Jokic. He’s playing better than ever and has legitimately entered the MVP conversation. As of last night, he was averaging a triple-double with 24.3 points, 10.9 rebounds and 10.5 assists per game. He’s also shooting an insane 41.2% on three-point attempts and 82.1% from the charity stripe.

Porter Jr., who has missed the last seven games with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis, began the season on a tear. He showed flashes last season, but he’s done it with consistency so far this season. Porter Jr. is averaging 19.5 points on 42.3% shooting from deep – and he was really hooping in his last game, scoring 30 points on 12-for-18 shooting with 10 rebounds.

JaMychal Green is another bright spot that has done a lot to help replace Jerami Grant, who was lost to free agency. He came over from the Los Angeles Clippers as a free agent and he’s fit in very nicely. Green began the season on the bench due to an injury and, in the four games for which he was out, the Nuggets went 1-3 and gave up 120 or more points in three of those four games. Since Denver has surrendered only 109 points per game, which would be good for the 11th fewest in the NBA. He’s also shot the ball incredibly well (52.8% on three-point attempts), while his presence means that the Nuggets won’t have to rely as heavily on 35-year-old Paul Millsap. The hope is, if Green can stay on the court, the defense will continue to even out.

What’s Not Working

A number of things aren’t working right now for Denver. First and foremost, the Nuggets haven’t put forth a complete effort too often. For example, they built up an 18-point lead in the first half against the Brooklyn Nets earlier this week in which they scored 70 points. They went on to only score 46 in the second half and lost the game 122-116.

On a related note, Denver has also failed to close out tight games. Of their six losses, four were within three points or went to overtime.

Then there are the high-level defensive issues. Entering play last night, the Nuggets had the sixth-worst defensive rating in the league and were allowing opponents to shoot 39% on three-point attempts – also good for sixth-worst. Worse, all of that has been done while playing the fourth easiest schedule in the league.

Drilling down to individual player issues, Murray’s struggles haven’t helped. Yes, his numbers are alright, but 19.7 points, 3.8 assists and 2.9 rebounds is a bit underwhelming considering the performance he put on in the bubble last season. His shooting is down slightly, most notably from between 3-10 feet from the basket (36.8%), and he’s struggled a bit from the free-throw line, too (76.3%, down from 88.1%).

What Needs To Change

First of all, the Nuggets need time to acclimate to one another; the team added seven new players this offseason and when you consider the shortened training camp and limited preseason – which was really only one week long – that leaves little time to build synergy. Theoretically, that should improve with time.

Porter Jr.’s defense is another aspect that must change. He is regularly Denver’s soft spot in the defense because he either loses focus or takes defensive shortcuts. The upside, Porter Jr. is still just a sophomore and his defensive should improve with time – he certainly has the requisite skills needed to be a successful defender (e.g., length and athleticism). So let’s give him a little more time before we make any bold claims about him.

Finally, the Nuggets have to find a way to deploy Bol Bol. Bol is averaging just 6 minutes per game. Sure, he’s incredibly lean and might not match up well in the half court with most bigs. Additionally, he’s a bit hesitant to shoot, despite a solid range. But, while the Nuggets are clearly in win-now mode, what contender couldn’t use a 7’2” shooter with a 7’8” wingspan? If they get Bol a bit more burn and he can mature, it would give the Nuggets one of the most unique weapons in the entire league. And, to Denver’s credit, Bol did receive the first two start of his young career in back-to-back games this week — perhaps that change is already underway.

The Nuggets may have started slowly, but all should be well in Denver. The Western Conference is incredibly competitive, but the Nuggets have more talent than most and, assuming finishing the season is realistic given COVID-19’s impact on it already, the Nuggets should be comfortable with where they are, regardless of their early-season record.

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NBA Daily: Fixing The Houston Rockets

Matt John continues Basketball Insiders’ “Fixing” series by taking a look at the newly-minted Houston Rockets, a team that now has given itself plenty of options.

Matt John

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In the most well-timed edition of Fixing ever, we’re taking a look at the very recently-revamped Houston Rockets. We all knew that one trade was coming one way or the other and now the time has arrived. For how well-designed this beautiful era of basketball was for the Rockets, it surely didn’t deserve the anti-climactic ending it got. Yet here we are. For the first time since Yao Ming’s retirement, Houston is starting from scratch.

Is all hope lost in H-Town? Well, losing Mike D’Antoni, Daryl Morey and Harden is basically like the Justice League losing Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman in one swift motion. It would be a major setback for anyone. In situations like this, it’s not about what you lost. It’s about how you respond to what you lost. To their credit, Houston had time to prepare for the disintegration of the Harden-D’Antoni-Morey era, and they haven’t taken their departures lying down.

They’ve wiped the slate mostly clean and, even if there’s definitely room for improvement, the new-look Rockets are a little more exciting than what meets the eye.

What’s Working?

It is a shame that Harden never gave this group a chance. Houston had a better offseason than they were given credit for because the high-profile personnel that they lost (or were about to lose) overshadowed what they brought in. Compared to past teams that faced similar circumstances, Houston could have done a lot worse. Let’s start with the best-kept secret that gets more and more exposed by the hour: Christian Wood.

NBA nerds hyped up Wood throughout the offseason for how great he looked during the brief time he was the full-time center in Detroit – averaging nearly 23/10 on 56/40/76 splits. When you take the sample size (13 games) and how Detroit fared in that stretch (they lost all but one game) into account, it’s understandable why it was hard to buy stock in Wood’s potential during the mini off-season.

That’s why Houston got him at the value they did and he’s already one of the league’s better bargains. Those numbers he put up as a Piston have carried on with the Rockets; while his 53/34/66 splits with almost two blocks per game have put him on the map. Wood’s ascension hasn’t led to much team success yet, but he’s the last player to blame for that.

Then there’s Houston’s more well-repped new addition, John Wall. Wall’s probably never going to live up to the $40+ million deal that Houston is paying him, but they didn’t acquire him for that reason. They acquired him in the hopes of him giving them more bang for their buck than Russell Westbrook did. The results have been a mixed bag, but that’s to be expected after what he’s been through. It’s been encouraging to see that on a good day, he still has most of his form.

There are plenty of games left for him to find consistency. We also have to keep in mind that Wall’s just getting his feet wet following two awful injuries. Even if he’s not the same Wall from his prime, this has worked out a lot better for Houston than Westbrook has in Washington. Having the better player as well as an additional first-round pick should be counted as an absolute win for the Rockets.

There are other stand-out players: It looks like the Rockets found another keeper in rookie Jae’Sean Tate who, along with David Nwaba, have infused the Rockets with badly needed energy.

Things were obviously better last year when Harden and co. were content, but the Rockets are far from a disaster.

What’s Not Working?

Well, James Harden. Plain and simple. When a superstar wants out, it wears the team down internally. That elephant is too big for the room to ignore, clear that both sides were done with each other by the end. Houston deserves props for willing to get “uncomfortable” just as they promised, but a superstar wanting out brings down the team’s morale no matter what.

It’s why Houston started 3-6 with the league’s ninth-lowest net rating at minus-1.8. There were other factors at play here with all the shuffling parts, but there’s no need for fluff. Harden’s trade demand loomed too large for it not to affect the Rockets. It’s hard for everyone when the best player on the team isn’t buying in. His teammates were complaining about him publicly.

The upshot is that it’s over now. Losing James Harden the player certainly isn’t addition by subtraction – in Houston’s case, that’s Westbrook – but losing James Harden the distraction could certainly be for this season.

What’s Next?

Now that the dust has settled, the Rockets can finally take a deep breath and sort out both their present and their future. Presently, there’s going to be even more shuffling now than there was before. At the very least, the roster is going to have players who should be on the same page.

Houston may still have some loose ends from its previous era. From the looks of things, PJ Tucker could be the next one to go. Houston’s prospects are on the come up, but a player with Tucker’s abilities should be on a contender. That’s something that the Rockets, as of now, are not. The same goes for Eric Gordon, but it’s tough to see any of the elite teams willing to put up enough salaries to trade for his contract.

Then there’s the newly-acquired Victor Oladipo.

Oladipo has been a good soldier in spite of the trade rumors that have buzzed around him over the last several months. Indiana trading him to Houston signified that he wasn’t re-signing with them. Houston provides a unique opportunity for Oladipo to further re-establish his value as a star. It’s hard to foresee if he’s in their long-term plans or if he’s another asset to move in their rebuild.

With all that said, new head coach Stephen Silas seems to have won over the players. After beating the San Antonio Spurs last night without Harden or Wall, the Rockets, despite not being in the tier of elite teams anymore, should be excited for what the season holds.

As for what the future will bring, their outlook is a lot brighter than it was back in September. Even if they’ll face the repercussions of giving up most of their own first-round picks for Westbrook and Robert Covington last year, they just hauled in a massive load of first-round picks and four pick swaps combined for Westbrook, Covington and Harden since then.

The development of players should put Houston in a good light, which could pay huge dividends for their chances in free agency. We’ve seen teams establish a great team culture while building up a promising future – ahem, the very same Brooklyn Nets that just cashed in for Harden proved that.

The Rockets might be next in line.

The days of Houston being a contender are gone for now. But, thankfully, the days of the Rockets becoming one of the NBA’s premier League Pass favorites may have only begun.

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NBA Daily: Payton Pritchard — Boston’s Bench Band-Aid

Basketball Insiders’ Shane Rhodes breaks down the fortuitous start to Payton Pritchard’s rookie season and what it’s meant to the Boston Celtics.

Shane Rhodes

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For the Boston Celtics, Payton Pritchard has been exactly what the doctor ordered.

Boston sported, arguably, the NBA’s worst bench unit a season ago. Despite a fearsome-foursome of Jaylen Brown, Gordon Hayward, Jayson Tatum and Kemba Walker, their lack of depth hurt them all season long. It stood in direct contrast to their Eastern Conference Finals opponent, the Miami HEAT, and, ultimately, sank the Celtics’ shot at the NBA Finals.

Now, with Hayward gone to the Charlotte Hornets and Walker on the mend, it was only logical to expect that dearth to once again be their Achilles heel. But, on the contrary, the bench has been rejuvenated — or, at the very least, much improved — to start the 2020-21 season.

And, albeit unexpectedly, Boston has the rookie out of Oregon to thank for that.

Pritchard, the 26th pick in the 2020 NBA Draft, faced some serious questions about his game in the lead up to the season. He left the NCAA as the recipient of both the Bob Cousy and Lute Olson awards, given to the nation’s top point guard and non-freshman player, respectively, and served as a leader for the Ducks throughout his four years with the team.

However, in the NBA, a league that’s far bigger, faster and stronger than any competition he’s ever faced, plenty were concerned as to how Pritchard’s game might translate. He’ll never be the most athletic player on the court and, when combined with his 6-foot-2 frame, that raised some serious concerns about his defensive viability at the game’s highest level.

On top of that, Pritchard was far from the only addition the Celtics made this offseason; fellow rookie Aaron Nesmith was thought by some to be the best shooter in the draft, while Jeff Teague and Tristan Thompson are battle-tested veterans that would demand a rotation spot from the jump.

Despite those stacked odds, however, Pritchard immediately took a rotation spot for his own, ahead of the higher drafted Nesmith and alongside the veteran Teague in Boston’s pecking order. In doing so, he’s brought a major spark to a bench that desperately needed one.

Save for a 23 point, 8 assist performance against the Toronto Raptors, he hasn’t jumped out of the boxscore. But Pritchard’s played with a veteran’s confidence and has contributed in nearly every game so far this season.

In fact, he’s played with a tenacity that even some of the more hard-nosed veterans lack, while his knack for the timely play has put Boston in the position to win on almost every possession. Pritchard is a +45 in his 10 games played, good for second among rookies and third among Celtics.

Like on this steal and drawn foul with the clock winding down against the Washington Wizards. Or his tip-in game-winner against the HEAT. Pritchard, at all times, is aware of where he needs to be on the court and, more importantly, when he needs to be there to put the team in the best position to succeed. Likewise, he’s moved with or without the ball and put himself in the position to help his teammates make the easy play as often as possible.

That presence of mind is something you just can’t teach — and Pritchard has it in spades.

Beyond the court, Pritchard has easily endeared himself to his Celtics teammates. Brown referred to him as “the GOAT” after just his fourth game, a win over the Pacers in which Pritchard finished with 10 points, 5 rebounds and 5 assists in just over 27 minutes and was clutch down the stretch. Marcus Smart, known for his tenacious style of play, has said “the sky’s the limit” for Pritchard and has noted many similarities between himself and the rookie as far back as the preseason.

A bit more reserved, head coach Brad Stevens said “[Pritchard]’s had more good nights, for sure, than not,” after the rookie flashed against the Raptors.

Still, it’s clear Stevens, like the others, has quickly taken a liking to Pritchard and, further, has expected a lot of the late-first rounder. Pritchard, on multiple occasions and despite his lack of NBA experience, has served as part of Boston’s closing lineup, an ultimate show of respect from a coach like Stevens that values defensive execution above most else on the court.

“We’re going to ask him to do a lot right now. And, fair or unfair to him, he’s going to have to be consistent for us, for us to have a chance to be a good team.”

And Stevens is right; to be the best version of themselves, Pritchard must continue to improve his own game and help push the bench even further.

Of course, that kind of pressure is nothing new to Pritchard who, over his four seasons with the Ducks, carried the team on his shoulders and constantly stepped up when they needed him most. And, while he’s been lauded with praise, the rookie has continued to stay humble.

“Coming in, I’m just trying to do my part,” Pritchard said after the team’s aforementioned win over the Pacers. “It’s my fourth game, everything’s coming at me fast and I’m still figuring things out.”

“I just want to win and I want to help as much as I can to get a win.”

As the Celtics forge their path ahead and continue to outfit the roster, players that not only contribute right away but can elevate the play of Boston’s star duo, Tatum and Brown, will be the priority.

And, if any of them are as rock-solid as Pritchard has been so far, the Celtics will be well on their way to an NBA title.

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