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NBA PM: What NBA Rule Should Be Changed?

In our weekly Thursday group conversation, we asked our guys what rules should the NBA consider changing.

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Some Rules Need Changing

In what is a weekly Thursday feature, we ask three of our Basketball Insiders to weigh in on a common question. This week, we asked: What NBA Rule Needs To Be Changed?

Jump Shot Fouls

Kudos to the NBA introducing some innovative rule changes this summer that should speed up the pace of play and result in quicker games next season. While other leagues talk about improving their product and making it more fan-friendly, Adam Silver and the folks in the NBA’s New York offices actually step up and make it happen.

However, that doesn’t mean that the league shouldn’t continue to fine-tune and figure out other ways to improve their product.

One glaring issue that the NBA needs to address is the number of fouls called on players attempting jump shots. In particular, players who get awarded three free throws when they initiate contact and draw a foul while attempting three-pointers.

James Harden is far and away the biggest benefactor when it comes to exploiting the NBA’s outdated rules on what actions are deemed foul-worthy while in the act of shooting. During the 2016-17 regular season, according to Basketball-Reference, Harden drew a foul on a three-point attempt 124 times. That is a mind-boggling number. Harden had drawn 27 such fouls in 2014-15, and that number increased 46 in 2015-16. It’s not an issue limited solely to Harden in Houston; three-point fouls were up across the league last year. With Harden and others having now mastered this “skill,” it’s time for the NBA to make changes.

The problem is that defenders frequently get whistled for fouling a 3-point shooter, despite the fact they are actually playing solid defense. Harden, for instance, often initiates contact by latching onto a defenders hand or wrist as he begins his shot. In real time, the referee is often unable to determine who the guilty party is. Yet, because Harden’s ability to make the shot is diminished, and he has learned to sell the foul so well, he gets the benefit of the doubt. As a result, the defensive player is found guilty of committing a foul, despite being in perfectly sound defensive position. As if guarding the incredibly skilled Harden wasn’t difficult enough, defenders are essentially forced to keep their hands as far away from Harden as possible. This makes contesting shots extremely difficult.

The other way Harden and others, including Lou Williams, Kyle Lowry and Damian Lillard (to name just a few) often draw fouls from behind the arc is stopping short as defenders fight over a screen. Again, the defense is at a disadvantage despite exerting great effort to follow their coach’s orders to constantly pressure the ball handler.

Due to the current interpretation of the rules, offensive players have a huge advantage. It’s time for the NBA to crack down on some of these inequities, and give defenders a fair chance.

– Tommy Beer

Shortening The Post-Rebound Shot Clock

Beginning this season, the NBA has implemented new rules to improve the flow of games. Specifically, the NBA is looking at improving end of game situations when teams have previously opted to use multiple timeouts and commit intentional fouls in certain situations.

Some of the changes that were made included lowering the total number of timeouts a team may use to seven. In addition, “full” timeouts and “20-second” timeouts have been replaced by a standard 75-second team timeout. Teams will also be limited to how many timeouts they may use at the end of games.

As the league continues to look at speeding up the length of games, one rule they should consider looking at is shortening the shot clock following an offensive rebound. Currently, if a team records an offensive rebound or otherwise maintains possession of the ball after a missed shot, the shot clock resets to 24 seconds.

One suggestion that has been made to speed up possessions is to lower the shot clock to 14 seconds in these situations. Several basketball organizations across the globe have adopted this philosophy, including FIBA, the Euroleague and Eurocup. The WNBA followed the course and adopted this rule prior to the 2016 season.

In fact, this change was used last season in the G League. The NBA has used its development league for several years now to try out some different rule changes. With this shot clock suggestion, it could be a rule the NBA continues to try out in the G League with the idea of adding it to the NBA in the future.

Shortening the shot clock following offensive rebounds figures to add additional possessions to games and create more scoring opportunities. The NCAA has looked at this idea as well in an attempt to increase higher-scoring games. A change like this could even create more excitement during the final minutes of games when teams are attempting to mount a comeback.

While the league would certainly be motivated to implement this change to speed up games, some players are indifferent to the idea. One NBA player told Basketball Insiders he doesn’t think it would make that much of a difference, and he feels most shots following an offensive rebound are made within 10 seconds anyway.

Another player said he agrees with a possible change and that games would be much quicker, and feels as though the product on the floor would be better. He said a change like this would make positions more important, especially for good offensive teams. Players would be more inclined to box out and rebound better as well.

A third player from an overseas club told Basketball Insiders that he loves the rule and said it creates better pace during games. He joked that grabbing an offensive rebound with this rule gives him the best opportunity to shoot a quick three-pointer given the shorter shot clock.

As the league continues to look at ways to improve the game, this rule could be one that comes to life. A potential change like this one may not be implemented until the league conducts more research on the topic, but don’t be surprised to see this one sooner than later.

– Cody Taylor

Goaltending

There isn’t a whole lot to think about when it comes to changing current rules set in place in the NBA, but there is one tweak they could make down the road—goaltending.

When a player is looking for a chance to give his team life after a missed shot, that usually comes with a putback. It’s an exciting play that energizes the crowd and shifts momentum to the team that capitalizes on the second chance opportunity.

There is a bit of hesitation sometimes, though, because the league mandates the “invisible cylinder.” Putting it simply: Once the ball hits the rim, it must ricochet completely off the iron before any player can touch it. Because of this, players are often hit with the dreaded offensive interference call that results in a turnover. That’s a killer to the team who is punished.

So how do you fix this issue? Simple—adopt the International Basketball Federation’s way of doing things.

FIBA’s goaltending protocol is the exact same as the NBA’s regarding blocking a ball on a downward path, but aside from that, it’s basically a free-for-all. As soon as the ball touches the rim, it’s fair game. That means both players can do what they please with it—back taps, put backs, swats, you name it.

The adjustment would be noticeable, but not terribly difficult. International players can be found on nearly all 30 teams in the league, and the new ones coming in would have an even smoother transition than their predecessors.

Team USA dominated FIBA tournaments and the Olympics under these regulations. Big men would most definitely welcome the change because it would make their job less tactical and more active.

Just like it was in the years before the three-point wave came along, having a towering center or athletic power forward manning the paint could play a more crucial role than those outside threats on the perimeter.

The decisions referees make in a split second are difficult, especially having to make a judgment call with a non-existent barrier. By altering the rule, it makes their life easier as well. It’s a win-win situation for all parties involved.

If the NBA were to implement a new goaltending guideline, it would take some getting used to. It wouldn’t be a ridiculously drastic change, but it’d be something that could benefit teams in the long term.

– Spencer Davies

Every Thursday we’ll ask three of our guys to chime in on a common subject. If there is something you would like to see us address. Drop it to us on Twitter at @BBallInsiders using the hashtag #ConversationThursday.

More Twitter: Make sure you are following all of our guys on Twitter to ensure you are getting the very latest from our team: @stevekylerNBA, @MikeAScotto, @LangGreene, @EricPincus, @joelbrigham, @TommyBeer, @MokeHamilton , @jblancartenba, @Ben_Dowsett, @CodyTaylorNBA, @SpinDavies, @BuddyGrizzard, @JamesB_NBA, @DennisChambers_, and @Ben__Nadeau .

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2018 NBA Draft Diary

Sources: Gregg Popovich, Kawhi Leonard Held Meeting on Tuesday

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San Antonio Spurs star Kawhi Leonard met with coach Gregg Popovich on Tuesday in San Diego, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

The meeting between the two faces of the Spurs’ franchise was done professionally and confidentially, league sources said.

Source: Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports

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NBA Daily: Lots Of NBA Draft Chatter

With the 2018 NBA Draft less than 50 hours away, Basketball Insiders’ publisher Steve Kyler digs into the last from around the NBA.

Steve Kyler

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Lots Of NBA Draft Chatter

With the 2018 NBA Draft on Thursday, things in NBA circles are getting interesting, specifically on the trade front.

The final 2018 Consensus Mock Draft will drop tomorrow, just after the media availabilities in New York, from there we’ll be tracking the minute to minute news, trades and rumors in the 2018 NBA Draft Diary.

So, with that in mind, let’s dig into what we know some 50 hours until the draft gets underway.

Kawhi Watch In Full Swing

With the news last week that San Antonio Spurs forward Kawhi Leonard may no longer want to be a Spur breaking, there is still a sense in NBA circles that the Spurs are not going to listen to trade offers until the hear from Kawhi directly.

If you know anything about the Spurs organization, you know that we won’t hear the details of this situation in a minute by minute way like we do from some organizations, especially considering the Spurs have never had to deal with a scenario quite like this.

The interesting part of this story is how split the “sourcing” is on what’s real. There have been reports from several different reporters suggesting that the situation isn’t as dire as initially reported and that the Spurs and Leonard have had dialogue, but not the face-to-face meeting the Spurs covet.

It’s unclear why there hasn’t been a meeting, and that is what has some in NBA circles believing the Spurs will open up the phones on Wednesday and see what they can extract for Leonard if only to do their due diligence.

One league source commented that it might be tough for the Spurs to get value out of Leonard mainly because of his injury situation and the idea that he’d only re-sign with the Lakers. The same source doubted that Leonard’s camp would fence themselves inmto just the Lakers because that would make getting him traded extremely difficult, especially if the Lakers wouldn’t offer value to San Antonio.

The sense today is the Spurs are standing their ground. The thing to know is that this situation still seems very fluid, and that face-to-face conversation (or lack of one) could swing this thing in either direction. It is clear several teams would have interest if the Spurs decide to listen to offers, even if it just a rental for the upcoming season.

Trades At The Top Still Viable

It a typical NBA draft there is chatter about top tier picks being traded, but usually, it dies off the week for the draft as teams look in on who they ultimately want to draft.

This year, and unlike previous years there is a sense that several of the picks at the top of the board could be had, especially if it returns draft picks later in the draft and solid veterans.

The Sacramento Kings seem to be leaning towards keeping their pick at number two, and it’s looking more and more likely that Marvin Bagley III is their guy. The Kings took a very long look at Michael Porter Jr, and as of this weekend there was a sense they were OK with where Porter Jr is at medically, but he may lose out to the less risky Bagley. League sources continue to doubt the Kings grab Euro sensation Luke Dončić, so we’ll see if that holds true as we get to draft day.

The Atlanta Hawks have had the third overall pick on the market from almost the moment they landed it. The Hawks seem ready to use the pick but are said to still be exploring their options. The prevailing thought this week is it’s down to Bagley, Jaren Jackson Jr. and Trae Young for the Hawks, with more and more league sources believing the Hawks will draft Young at three. While the notion of grabbing Young at three may seem high, the Hawks have had eyes on Young from the start of the process, and not much seems to have changed. The Hawks have made it clear they would take on contract money in exchange for additional draft assets, so it seems likely the Hawks will be active, even if it’s not moving the third pick.

Things start to get interesting with Memphis at number four. There have been numerous reports that the Grizzlies have dangled the fourth pick in an attempt to shed the contract of Chandler Parsons. Sources close to the situation say the Grizzlies have had some offers, and most of them involve the Grizz picking up expiring contracts and additional draft assets lower in the draft. It’s unclear if the Grizzlies will pull the trigger, but they seem to have deals if they want one.

The prevailing thought in NBA circles is the Grizzlies are the first real landing spot for Dončić. There is also talk of Wendell Carter Jr., and Mo Bamba landing at four.

The Dallas Mavericks at five seem open to taking on contract dollars and could be the landing spot for the fourth pick and Chandler Parsons, but league sources say the Mavericks would not give up the fifth pick unless it returned an All-Star or would-be All-Star.

There are a few other situations to watch as several teams have expressed interest in moving up. The Clippers hold two pretty solid selections and 12 and 13 and seem willing to combine them to move into the top 5. The Denver Nuggets have also expressed some interest in moving to the top five.

The Lakers and Celtics have expressed similar interest at points in the process, but both seem reluctant at this point to part with future assets to pay the price to jump to the top of the draft.

Porter Still A Possibility

The Michael Porter Jr. situation is murky. After two visits from NBA teams, the word on Porter is mixed. NBA teams have seen his MRIs and his medical, and select teams were allowed to bring their doctors and trainers to his most recent “workout.”

The worst case from one team that’s not considering him is that he may require an additional surgery down the line. This same team said their doctors didn’t think anything going on with Porter would jeopardize his career, but they felt like he’d have to be on a program and has a ways to go before they’d deem him a 100 percent.

The upside case, from a team with Porter squarely on their board, is that there wasn’t anything going on they didn’t expect and that their staff felt fairly positive they could not only manage his situation, but they felt they could get him right fairly quickly.

Amusingly, the narrative around Porter is that he could be the next Kevin Durant-type scorer in the NBA (Porter clearly isn’t as long and lanky as Durant) – but he does possess the ability to get his offense against almost anyone.

As one executive whose team wasn’t considering Porter joked, you could get Durant or you could get Greg Oden, hinting at the injury-riddled career of the former top pick back in 2007.

Where Does Luka Go?

There isn’t a more polarizing NBA Draft prospect than Real Madrid’s Luke Dončić. You would be hard-pressed to find an NBA executive who didn’t think Dončić could be special in the NBA. But you might also be hard-pressed to find one willing to bet their job on it.

Throughout this process, more than a couple of executives have expressed they are hopeful Dončić goes high, mainly because it would give them cover in future drafts to do the same thing, which is draft what appears to be the most NBA ready player in the class, despite his flaws.

The problem is if Dončić isn’t special or struggles like some have concerns he might, not only would a team leave a potential franchise cornerstone on the board to in passing on uber-talented collegiate prospects, it might cost the lead executive their jobs.

While that seems somewhat short-sighted, think about the executives drafting in the top six. How many are not under pressure to turn their franchises around? And would a huge draft miss seal their fate?

Atlanta’s Travis Schlenk at three seems pretty secure. Dallas’ Donnie Nelson at five seems pretty secure. Orlando’s Jeff Weltman and John Hammond at six seem fairly secure, but it gets dicey elsewhere in the top 10.

As we’ve seen in previous drafts, NBA executives can and often do outthink themselves, which why every draft has quality impact guys falling later in the process.

There is little doubt Dončić is going in the top 10; it would be pretty surprising if he got past Dallas at five.

Sexton Over Young?

The Orlando Magic seems to be dialing in on what’s there for them at six, assuming they don’t trade up, which they have explored with both Atlanta and Memphis. The prevailing thought among fans is that if Trae Young is there at six, the Magic will pounce.

Early on in the process, though, the Magic seemed to be seriously interested in Collin Sexton, and word is that be might the Magic’s guy at six. The Magic ultimately will catch what falls to them, and if Dončić, Bagley or Jackson are there, things get interesting. However, if the draft goes as scripted, Orlando seems more likely to go, Sexton, Bamba, Carter or Knox than Young – at least at this point.

The draft is a fluid domino effect process, so at six the Magic have to cover a lot of bases, and it seems they have with their individual workouts.

The Magic desperately covet an impact player, so don’t be surprised if the Magic pull the trigger on a move-up deal, especially as we get closer and closer to the moment of truth.

Bamba Could Slide

You won’t find many NBA executives who don’t find Texas big man Mo Bamba intriguing. The problem for Bamba if there are some many super talented bigs in the 2018 NBA draft he is caught in a numbers game.

League sources said recently that Bamba is in the mix at two to the Kings, four to Grizzlies, five to Mavericks, six to the Magic and seven to the Bulls. The problem is he doesn’t seem to be the first or second option to any of those teams at this point.

According to league sources there continues to be questions about how his offensive game fits into the modern NBA, and with more versatile guys sitting at the top of the draft, Bamba is looking more like the consolation prize later in the draft. You will be hard-pressed to find anyone who doesn’t think Bamba will be a monster defensively in the NBA, but the question remains which team is drafting defense at the top of the board?

If there is a player outside of the top five that could tumble a little, it might be Bamba, especially if the Mavericks pass at five.

Over the next few days, we’ll be posting all of the draft-related news, notes, rumors and trades in the 2018 NBA Draft Day Diary, so if you want a one-stop shop for all things NBA Draft, bookmark it.

More Twitter: Make sure you are following all of our guys on Twitter to ensure you are getting the very latest from our team: @stevekylerNBA, @LangGreene, @EricPincus, @TommyBeer, @MokeHamilton , @jblancartenba, @Ben_Dowsett, @SpinDavies, @JamesB_NBA, @DennisChambers_, @MattJohnNBA, and @Ben__Nadeau .

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NBA Daily: Kaiser Gates Determined To Silence His Doubters

He may not be listed on some draft boards or seen as an impact player by certain individuals, but Kaiser Gates knows what he’s made of.

Spencer Davies

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If you’re looking to further your career at the next level but coming out of college as a prospect on the fringe, you’d better be willing to work twice as hard to draw attention from the basketball world.

Attending the Preparation Pro Day in Miami with team representatives and scouts watching, Kaiser Gates wanted to show everybody who was there that the chip on his shoulder would drive him to silence his doubters.

“I feel like I have a lot to prove,” Gates said in Miami. “I feel like a lot of the guys in the draft this year, I’m just as good if not better than (them), so I gotta show that.”

After three years at Xavier University, the 22-year-old decided it was time to move on from the program and passed on his senior year to enter the NBA Draft. The news came as a surprise to many, considering he might’ve gotten the opportunity to earn an even more expanded role next season with the departure of Musketeer favorites Trevon Bluiett and J.P. Macura.

The numbers across the board weren’t exactly eye-catching. Primarily a wing, Gates knocked down 37.8 percent of his threes as a junior. He averaged 7.2 points and 4.6 rebounds in almost 24 minutes per game.

Looking at conference play in the Big East, those figures took a dip. Gates shot less than 30 percent from deep and really struggled to contribute offensively for Xavier against tougher opponents.

There was an incredible discrepancy in shot selection over his three-year collegiate career. Astoundingly enough, 300 of his 409 career attempts came outside of the arc. The other 109 tries were twos, which he converted at a 54.1 percent rate.

It’s hard to ignore statistical evidence when it comes to evaluating players, but misuse and fit could have been more prominent factors in this case. It’s something that happens quite a bit at school programs with prospects, and Gates believes that he could be added to that list of mishandled talent.

“I don’t think I’m inconsistent at all,” Gates said. “At Xavier, I know my stats showed that I was inconsistent. Playing at that school it was a great experience—great guys, great coaches.

“Just kinda like my situation and the way I was playing at that school didn’t really allow me to showcase my full talents, and with that being said, it’s kinda hard to stay consistent not doing something I’m used to doing.”

Furthering the point, it’s not easy to be judged off that information, which some use as the only indication of what you’ll bring to the pros. Gates plans on using that as motivation whenever he meets with different teams.

“I would come in and people would just assume like, ‘Oh he could shoot a little bit, play defense, a little athletic.’ But I know on the flip side, I know what I can really do and like, my full potential.

“So when I know that and see what teams already think, already have in their head, just now it’s up to me to prove to them what I can do and show them what I can do.”

So what does that exactly entail?

“My first few years or so, I’ll probably be more of a three-and-D guy—stretch the floor, play defense make hustle plays, rebound the ball, things like that,” Gates said. “But as I’mma grow, (I’ll) look to expand on my game. Maybe work out the pick-and-roll a little bit and expand from there.”

Thus far, the 6-foot-8, 228-pounder has reportedly worked out for multiple organizations, including the Cleveland Cavaliers and Chicago Bulls. He is enjoying the draft process and his growth as a player since it started.

He may not be listed on some draft boards or seen as an impact player by certain individuals, but Gates knows what he’s made of. And if he can attract the right set of eyes, he’ll be in good shape.

“You could get 30 workouts and that one team could fall in love with you,” Gates said.

“That’s what [my agent] Aaron Turner’s always talking to me about. He’s always said, ‘It only takes one team.’”

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