Connect with us

NBA

NBA Sunday: David Stern on Adam Silver

Moke Hamilton recalls a conversation with David Stern and looks at Adam Silver’s first 18 months on the job.

Moke Hamilton

Published

on

Back in February, at New York University’s School of Professional Studies Tisch Institute for Sports Management, Media, and Business, David Stern gave a lecture on his commissionership and his 30-year tenure with the National Basketball Association.

Afterward, Commissioner Stern was kind enough to give me a few minutes of his time to discuss a number of things related to the NBA, its business, the new labor agreement and some of the issues that Commission Adam Silver has already had to deal with over the course of the early going of his tenure.

“[Adam]’s doing a great job,” Stern told Basketball Insiders.

“He’s entitled to it. He’s been with me for 22 years in five different positions, but he’s always reported to me. As I told the owners, he’s ready and he’s proven it in the first year of his commissionership by 110 percent.”

During the last round of labor negotiations, it was Silver who was the most active voice for the league and its interests. Having already emerged as an influential figure and ally for Stern, the league and its players eventually ratifying what many saw as a more owner-friendly collective bargaining agreement was a sign of good things to come.

The swiftness with how he dealt with the Donald Sterling situation and the league’s $24 billion television deal are two other episodes that reflect positively on the new commissioner.

“I think it’s something that we got to but it is where we were going,” Stern told Basketball Insiders. “I think it’s great and I’m very excited for Adam and the owners and the franchise values. I had no doubt it would happen, but it’s great to see it actually happen.”

Indeed, as I spoke with Stern about Silver “hitting the ground running,” the league was still two weeks away from the 2015 All-Star Weekend, and by this point, there had been a lot of concern coming from the players union regarding the toll that travel and four games in five-night stretches had on players over the course of the long season.

Quite a few general managers shared those concerns and it quickly became something quite rare—an issue upon which the league’s management and its players union agreed.

A few weeks later, in addressing the media at Barclays Center on All-Star Saturday night, Silver let it be known that the league had taken note of the concerns that had been shared by both its Board of Governors and the union, and he addressed them, head-on. The hope, according to Silver, is to eliminate the four games in five nights and to both reduce travel frequency and even back-to-backs.

The other elephant in the room, however, was playoff reform. It is something that even the league’s players were discussing, and in several conversations with the likes of Wesley Matthews, Tim Duncan, DeMarcus Cousins, James Harden and Damian Lillard, the prevailing sentiment from them was that reform was something that would ultimately benefit the league, its playoff system and competitive balance.

And for all that he has done so far, including taking a long, hard look at lottery form, it is that—playoff reform—which will be the first decision that Silver makes (or, at the very least, guides) that will have a direct impact on the on-court product of the league.

“[Playoff reform] is something that’s been talked about for a very long time,” Stern told Basketball Insiders. Still, the former commissioner, showing reverence to his understudy, refused to go on record with a recommendation as to what he thinks Silver should do.

“Let’s wait and see what [Silver] does,” Stern said with a smile. “I’m sure he’ll do the right thing.”

And as we chatted about the state of the NBA, some of his regrets from his 30-year tenure with the league and how he currently spends his time, I remembered being at Madison Square Garden when Stern announced the drafting of LeBron James. I remembered how he, along with the other superstars of today—Dwyane Wade, Carmelo Anthony, Kevin Durant, Derrick Rose and Stephen Curry—assisted veteran ticket sellers like Kobe Bryant, Dirk Nowitzki and Kevin Garnett with the continued thriving of the league in the box office.

Amazingly, as I have had a first-hand view over the past 10 years, I realized, standing in front of the gray and clearly (although gracefully) aging Stern, that time truly does fly.

* * * * *

It has been 11 long years since the NBA realigned and divided its 30 teams into six divisions. With the Charlotte Hornets being reintegrated into the league as the Bobcats, the league had 30 teams competing and the four divisions—the Atlantic, Central, Pacific and Midwest—had seemingly become a bit too cramped.

The league realigned and it took 11 long years for the improbable to happen. As the want for playoff seeding changes became universal and Silver addressed the issue at All-Star Weekend, the league would see one of the most competitive playoff races in its history conclude with the 45-win Oklahoma City Thunder failing to qualify out in the Western Conference. For the first time since the realignment, all five teams from one division qualified for the postseason.

The Southwest Division—long having been the most competitive in the entire league—finally made modern history. Four teams won at least 50 games and the New Orleans Pelicans—by virtue of defeating the San Antonio Spurs on the final night of the regular season—squeaked past the injury-riddled Thunder, by virtue of a tie-breaker, for the final playoff spot in the conference.

Meanwhile, had the Thunder won 45 games as an Eastern Conference team, they would have earned the sixth seed and would have engaged in a competitive first round battle with the Chicago Bulls. It came as no surprise, then, when the league announced that it was moving forward with the recommendation that playoff seedings no longer be determined by division standing.

That is something that Basketball Insiders argued in this very space, as the Spurs dropped their seven-game first round series to the Los Angeles Clippers. The two teams did battle as the third and sixth seeds, despite the fact that each had a better record than the fourth-seeded Portland Trail Blazers.

The 56-win Clippers hosted the 55-win Spurs while the 51-win Blazers, by virtue of their fourth seed, did battle with the 55-win Grizzlies. Had the teams simply been aligned by their win-loss record, the Blazers would have drawn the Clippers in the first round while the Spurs would have battled the Grizzlies.

That would have robbed the fans of what many consider to have been the best playoff series of this past postseason, but it may have resulted in a similarly great second round matchup featuring Spurs trying their luck against the Golden State Warriors.

Regardless, the league should generally want to give teams with the better regular season record better odds of advancing further. In the very recent past, teams, players and coaches have been outspoken in their increasingly firm belief that the regular season “doesn’t matter,” and it is difficult to argue against that in the grand scheme of things.

It becomes impossible to argue that when a 55-win team, by virtue of division and seeding rules, earns a lower seed than a clearly inferior team playing in a weaker division.

With LaMarcus Aldridge leaving Portland to join the Spurs and Durant presumably returning to full health this coming season, it is quite likely that the Northwest Division will again feature just one playoff team. If, at the end of the day, the Thunder earn the fourth seed with a 52-win record and were seeded above the second and third place teams from the Southwest, irrespective of record, that would be more than unfortunate.

That would have been asinine.

Fortunately, Silver recognized this and has recommended a welcomed change.

As we speak, I am told, the league is working through numerous permutations and suggestions as to how to better strike competitive balance during the actual playoffs. From what I understand, the league is not currently considering going with a playoff-seeding approach that will take the top 16 teams across all conferences, but there is a belief that something will be done to severely reduce the probability of a team with a losing record qualifying for the playoffs.

First thing is first, though. And Silver deserves credit.

August 1, 2015 marks exactly 18 months since he took over the helm of the league that we love so dearly. If there is one thing he has proven over these 18 months, it’s that he is not afraid to discuss and tackle the issues that truly matter.

And that is something that his mentor, David Stern, is not surprised by.

“I think he has done a great job,” Stern told me back in February.

“We worked together for 22 years,” he said.

“Sometimes, the line was indiscernible between who was doing ‘it,’ him or me. So our success over much of the last 30 years was a shared enterprise.”

As Silver continues leading the league into tomorrow, expect he and his staff to continue looking at the issues that truly matter—those that impact the on-court product.

After 18 months, it is difficult to disagree with Stern. Yes, Silver has done a great job.

Best rest assured, both lottery reform and an overhaul to the current playoff system are being looked at intently. There is still much work to be done.

Moke Hamilton is a Deputy Editor and Columnist for Basketball Insiders.

Advertisement




2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Starting 5 - David Stern Talks Adam Silver - Today's Fastbreak

  2. Pingback: Oklahoma Central Credit Union Routing Number | Employee Credit

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2018 NBA Draft Diary

NBA Daily: The Winners Of The NBA Draft

Simon Hannig breaks down the winners from Thursday’s 2018 NBA Draft.

Simon Hannig

Published

on

The 2018 NBA Draft has come and gone, and although many teams have improved coming out of this loaded draft, five teams seemed to have walked away as the biggest winners.

The Phoenix Suns Got Their Guy

The Suns made a couple of splashes in the draft, selecting DeAndre Ayton with the first overall pick.

The Suns then drafted Zhaire Smith, but later traded his rights to the Philadelphia 76ers for Mikal Bridges.

In the second round of the draft, Phoenix selected Frenchman Elie Okobo and George King from Colorado, each of whom should be able to contribute right away. Ayton should be the starting center come opening night and Bridges could also start for the team immediately. If not, Bridges will be a valuable weapon coming off the bench for a team who is trying to win games and get back into the playoffs.

Does Mo Bamba Have The (Orlando) Magic?

The Orlando Magic got a stud in Mo Bamba, whom they surprisingly selected with the sixth overall pick in the draft. They later drafted Melvin Frazier in the second round. It was a bit surprising that the Tulane product lasted that long, but the Magic benefitted.

Orlando got a player who can contribute right away and could compete for a starting job. Frazier is a great rebounder and defender and could change the team’s defense all by himself. The club now has two young core pieces they can build around in Jonathan Isaac and Bamba and a young contributor in Frazier.

Although the team’s offense will likely be work in progress, they can be very scary on the defensive end.

Now, we’ll all wait to see if Bamba, the New York product, can carry the Magic back to respectability.

Atlanta Hawks Will Let It Fly

Despite the Hawks trading Luka Doncic, the Hawk drafted players that can help and contribute right away, plus Quavo from the Migos got his wish of Trae Young being selected.

With their second first round pick, the Hawks took sharpshooter Kevin Huerter from Maryland and they took Omari Spellman from Villanova with their third pick in the first round. The Hawks are starting to build themselves like the Warriors, getting sharpshooters in Young and Huerter. It is no surprise they are doing this as their current general manager, Travis Schlenk, worked with the Golden State Warriors before taking the job with the Hawks.

They have the core for their future and I am really excited to see what Young can do in the NBA.

The Rich Got Richer In Boston

The Celtics once again got a steal in Robert Williams from Texas A&M. They get another athletic big man who plays great defense and rebounds the ball very well. I am pretty surprised he fell this far.

He is another rim protector the Celtics can use. He averaged 2.5 blocks per game in college. He will also provide second chance opportunities for the team. Williams averaged 3.0 offensive rebounds per game in college. He is just a monster on the defensive end of the floor and on the boards.

He would have been a lottery pick in last years draft, but he decided to stay in school another year, and I am sure the Celtics are happy about that.

Luka Doncic Found A Good Home

The Mavericks have the best young backcourt duo in the NBA now in Dennis Smith Jr. and Luka Doncic. They also drafted Jalen Brunson from Villanova, acquired Ray Spalding from Louisville in a trade with the Sixers and drafted Kostas Antetokounmpo, Giannis’ younger brother, in the second round. I love the Mavs’ backcourt a lot.

It is going to be very scary in a couple of years. It will take time and patience to develop them, but it will be worth it. This is going to be a dynamic duo for years to come for the Mavs. The Mavs have set themselves up not only for the future, but also to compete and to try to get into the playoffs. It also depends if they can bring in a max player in free agency, but I love the core the Mavs are building.

The Mavs should be a better defensive team next season, and will be a better offensive team next season with the weapons they have added to the team.

The Mavs are the clear cut winners of the 2018 NBA Draft.

Continue Reading

2018 NBA Draft Diary

NBA Draft Night Trades

David Yapkowitz breaks down the trades that took place during the 2018 NBA Draft.

David Yapkowitz

Published

on

Another NBA Draft has come and gone. With rumors swirling all week about possible pick/player movement, the night remained relatively uneventful. There were a few trades that occurred, however. Here’s a quick breakdown of the movement that happened on draft night.

1. Atlanta Hawks/Dallas Mavericks

The Hawks and Mavericks completed the first trade of the night early on in the draft. Leading up to the draft, there were questions about how high Luka Doncic was going to be drafted. It was widely assumed that he wouldn’t slip past Dallas at No. 5. The Mavericks weren’t going to take that chance as the Hawks drafted Doncic with the intention of trading him to Dallas for Trae Young.

Both teams ultimately get what they need. It’s been reported that the Hawks might move on from Dennis Schroder this summer and they’ll need a point guard to replace him. Young is an explosive scorer who will fit in nicely with Atlanta’s rebuild. He can score from anywhere on the court and he’s a great playmaker as well.

For the Mavericks, they get a guy to add to their own young core with Dennis Smith Jr. and Harrison Barnes. Doncic has the size to play next to Smith in the backcourt. He’s quite possibly the best playmaker in the draft with a solid offensive game as well.

2. Charlotte Hornets/Los Angeles Clippers

The Hornets and Clippers consummated the second move the night by swapping their own draft picks. The Hornets took Shai Gilgeous-Alexander with the 11th pick and then immediately traded him to the Clippers for Miles Bridges, whom Los Angeles selected at No. 12.

For the Hornets, they get a guy who can play both forward positions. Bridges is more of a small forward but in small ball lineups, he can slide over to the four. Offensively he is at his best when he puts the ball on the floor and attacks the rim. He’s a decent shooter too.

The Clippers get a point guard who was rumored to climbing up many draft boards as the night approached. Gilgeous-Alexander is a solid pick for them provided both Patrick Beverly and Milos Teodosic’ injury history. He can also play off the ball if need be. He’s got the physical tools to be a very good defender at the NBA level. It’s not at all far-fetched to imagine him as the future long-term starting point guard for the Clippers.

The Hornets also got two future second-round picks from the Clippers.

3. Philadelphia 76ers/Phoenix Suns

The Sixers and the Suns had the next move of draft night, also swapping their picks. The Sixers selected hometown hero Mikal Bridges with the No. 10 pick and later traded him to the Suns for the No. 16 pick, Zhaire Smith.

Bridges made a lot of sense for the Sixers. Not only is he a local guy, but his mother works for the team as well. He was a talented player who fit their team. He gave a post-draft press conference raving about being a Sixer all the while he had been traded already. But such is life in the NBA. Instead, Phoenix gets a guy that’s ready to contribute in the NBA right away. He’s the prototypical 3&D type guy.

For the Sixers, Zhaire Smith is another guy who was steadily climbing the boards in the days leading up to the draft. He’s a very athletic prospect with good defensive instincts. He probably won’t play much right away, but he does have the potential to end up being one of the better rotation players in this draft.

The Sixers also get a 2021 first-round pick from the Suns via the Miami Heat. It’s highly likely this ends up being a lottery pick and thus giving the Sixers the chance to add a high-end talent to an already potent group.

4. Second-Round moves

There are a few second-round moves that were made as well.

For one, the Hawks selected Devonte Graham with the 34th pick and traded him to the Hornets for two future second-round picks. Graham is another NBA ready guy who can come in and immediately contend for backup point guard minutes behind Kemba Walker.

The Sixers were involved in another deal sending the No. 38 pick Khyri Thomas to the Detroit Pistons for two future second-round picks. Thomas is a player that many projected to go in the first round. For a team that didn’t have a first-round pick coming into the night, the Pistons essentially picked one up. It’s possible he turns out better than Detroit’s most recent first-rounders Henry Ellenson and Luke Kennard.

The Sacramento Kings drafted Gary Trent Jr. with the 37th pick only to trade him to the Portland Trail Blazers for two future second-round picks. Trent was one of the better shooters in the draft and that’s what he projects to the be in the NBA. He’s probably a few years away from earning a spot in the rotation but he was also a possible first-round pick. He’s more NBA ready than Anfernee Simons who the Blazers took in the first-round.

The Orlando Magic and Denver Nuggets swapped second-round picks with the Magic sending the No. 41 pick Jarred Vanderbilt to the Nuggets for the No. 43 pick Justin Jackson and a future second-round pick. Vanderbilt is a project in every sense of the word. He’s extremely raw and probably needed more time in college. But he’s got long-term potential and could pay off in the future. Jackson, on the other hand, was possibly a first-round talent had he entered the draft last year. He’s going to have to make the roster but could be a 3&D guy.

In the final move of the night, the Hornets traded the No. 45 pick Hamidou Diallo to the Oklahoma City Thunder. Diallo is a guy that had he come out last year, probably would’ve been a first-round guy. In any case, he is also very raw and will need seasoning in the G-League. He’s got all the physical tools and skill to be a good rotation NBA player.

Continue Reading

2018 NBA Draft Diary

#28 – Jacob Evans – Golden State Warriors

Jesse Blancarte

Published

on

With the 28th overall pick, the Golden State Warriors selected Cincinnati Junior Jacob Evans.

Evans represents a solid pick for nearly any NBA team. Evans fits in the mold of a potential 3-and-D role player. Evans improved in his time at Cincinnati, culminating in his junior year, where he scored 13 points and 4.7 rebounds per game. Evans spent three seasons at Cincinnati and rounded himself into a versatile two-way player who can bring a lot of value at the NBA level.

Evans is a very cognitive player, especially on the defensive end. He has a better grasp of his limitations than most players at this stage of their respective careers and is able to maximize his individual defensive ability within a team concept. Evans generally makes the right rotations, double-teams at the right times and funnels his opponents to where his teammates are when he cannot contain the ball-handler on his own. With the right coaching, he could become a valuable defensive wing in an NBA rotation sooner than some anticipate.

Additionally, Evans is more than just a shooter. He led his team in assists last season and has some skill as a playmaker. Evans will be more of a shooter and finisher in the NBA, but the ability to make the right pass, swing the ball when he isn’t open and take the ball off the dribble when necessary make him an intriguing prospect. This is especially true when you consider how valuable a player like Khris Middleton has become over the years, adding layers to his 3-and-D skill set each season.

The Warriors aren’t in need of an influx of talent but are happy to add Evans regardless.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

NBA Team Salaries

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending Now