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NBA Sunday: It’s Not Championship or Bust

While winning a championship is the goal, sometimes, there’s just as much joy in witnessing the pursuit.

Moke Hamilton

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A passionate and heated discussion ended with both sides agreeing to disagree. One defended the decision, while the other characterized it as cowardly.

It’s the morning of July 9, 2010, and just a few hours earlier, the star of stars had put on a spectacle that he will never live down. My siblings and I spent the day conversing about LeBron James, his spurning of and alienating of several fan bases, and whether the damage that he had done to his legacy was reversible or not.

Back then, almost seven years ago, James began what I have since referred to as the “modern NBA’s talent arms race.” Sure, the Boston Celtics had been the originators, but Kevin McHale and Danny Ainge were the ones who ultimately had to pull the trigger to make the union of Kevin Garnett with Paul Pierce and Ray Allen complete.

With James, it was different. And since his decision, everything else has been, too.

What we were taught by Allen Iverson, Tracy McGrady, Steve Nash and a bunch of their predecessors is that all that counts is the championship ring. And in the NBA, P.D.E. (Post-Decision Era), we are witnessing a paradigm-shifting mentality being adapted by the league’s superstars. It’s what led Jason Kidd back to Dallas, Ray Allen to Miami, Dwight Howard to Los Angeles (and then Houston) and Kevin Durant to Oakland.

Indeed, it was their pursuit of the almighty ring that led the aforementioned stars away from the cities where they had made their homes and from fans that had adored them.

The chase for the ring is all that’s important… Or is it?

* * * * * *

On July 7, 2016, after Kevin Durant had signed with the Golden State Warriors, the tweets, phone calls and text messages poured in. Many claimed that the NBA had been ruined. The Warriors would have no competition and they would undoubtedly meet up with the Cleveland Cavaliers to give NBA fans the first trilogy in NBA Finals history.

While some of that may eventually prove to be true, the notion that the regular season isn’t important and that one shouldn’t bother watching because the ending of the story is already known—it all flies in the face of what professional sports is truly supposed to be about.

Competition.

Today, a generation of sports fans are coming of age. They are the same ones that have been sold on the idea of Charles Barkley and Patrick Ewing somehow being lesser players than Karl Malone and David Robinson, primarily because of their inability to lift their franchises up to the top of the NBA mountain. Years later, history doesn’t remember that it was Ewing that led the Knicks up from the doldrums or that Barkley, who played his entire career being undersized, brought the Phoenix Suns within two wins of the 1993 NBA Championship.

So, at the end of the day, those that ignore what is transpiring in Toronto, Boston, Salt Lake City or Washington, D.C. have lost sight of an all-too-important fact: there should be an immense amount of pride and joy in putting up a fight. It would be quite easy for a general manager to shrug his shoulders, fire-sell his assets and pull the plug on his roster when he encounters a dominant force such as Michael Jordan, Shaquille O’Neal or LeBron James.

Instead, Danny Ainge, Masai Ujiri and Ernie Grunfeld have opted to fight. That absolutely counts for something, even if many of today’s fans can’t see that.

Make no mistake about it: NBA fans in Boston, Toronto and D.C. probably don’t think that their respective teams are better than the Cleveland Cavaliers, but any of them would take the opportunity to topple the mighty James in the Eastern Conference Finals, if given the choice.

It took Kobe Bryant almost his entire career to come to peace with an obvious truth: the joy doesn’t lay entirely in the intended destination. To a large extent, the joy is in the process of trying to become a champion. Seeing a team draft and raise players and go from a cellar-dweller to one with poise and polish—there is no greater reward in all of sports. Just go ask someone who has been watching the Utah Jazz.

Seeing that type of team compete over the years and battle ferociously with teams that are more talented and even better—there’s something quite admirable about the pursuit. That’s the reason why Ewing will never have to wait for a table in New York City. He absolutely avoids his fair share of checks, as well.

So next time someone tries to rain on your parade for taking joy in your team’s progression from an afterthought to one that has an opportunity to compete at the highest level, ask them whether they think that DeMar DeRozan or Kevin Love, to this point, has gotten more meaning out of their career. DeRozan was drafted by the Raptors in 2009 and has spent his entire career wearing the same jersey. He has squeezed every once of potential out of his being and, slowly but surely, has become one of the top shooting guards in the entire league. He has seen Chris Bosh, Andrea Bargnani and Jay Triano come and go, and he has seen the franchise slowly reinvent itself and become a contender.

In Boston, Isaiah Thomas has truly become a franchise player, and that’s nothing short of amazing. After being selected with the 60th overall pick in the 2011 draft by the Sacramento Kings, Thomas would last three years there before being traded to the Phoenix Suns for Alex Oriakhi. Oriakhi would never even appear in a regular season NBA game. After being undervalued and traded away from two teams, Thomas, despite being undersized, has become a mammoth in Boston. No, the Celtics may not have Kevin Durant, LeBron James or Kawhi Leonard, but they have something much more valuable: a core that has organically and improbably come together under the leadership of head coach Brad Stevens. They have a front office that has decided to go for it and compete, and they just so happen to enter play Sunday trailing the mighty Cavaliers for the top seed in the Eastern Conference by a half-game.

That counts for something.

That counts for something in the same exact way that Gordon Hayward’s coming of age does to fans of the Utah Jazz. As a rookie, Hayward had a front row seat to the friction between Jerry Sloan and Deron Williams. He was buried on the team’s bench, seeing less playing time than Williams, Raja Bell, C.J. Miles and Earl Watson. He’s seen Sloan and Tyrone Corbin walk through the door, but has also seen the likes of Alec Burks, Rudy Gobert and Rodney Hood arrive. He has sat at the forefront of the franchise’s changing of the guard and has been a part of a tremendous transformation.

Will he ultimately be a part of a championship team in Salt Lake City? I don’t know… But I can also guarantee you that, at this point, fans of the Jazz simply don’t care, because competing counts for something.

* * * * * *

In this Post-Decision Era, we have come to measure franchises and superstars by whether or not they are able to win championships, and that’s a travesty.

In a season that was deemed to be “unwatchable” because of Durant’s decision to head to Oakland and a league thought to be “in danger” because much of the league’s talent is concentrated on a few rosters, we have witnessed perhaps the greatest defiances ever.

Together, Russell Westbrook and James Harden have put together two of the finest seasons we have seen in the history of the NBA, the former nearing the accomplishment of a goal that hasn’t been seen in over 50 years. That Westbrook and Harden are both leading teams that many thought incapable of even qualifying for the playoffs makes their stories all the more enjoyable.

So go ahead and deem that their seasons will be for naught if they don’t lead to their franchises hoisting the Larry O’Brien trophy at the end. And then, go ask NBA fans in Oklahoma City or Houston if they agree. Just like the fans in Salt Lake City, Boston, Toronto and even D.C., they’ll tell you that you’re wrong.

Sometimes, there is a tremendous joy to be had in the pursuit. And it’s a shame that we, as a basketball culture, have lost sight of that.

Moke Hamilton is a Deputy Editor and Columnist for Basketball Insiders.

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NBA Opening Night Storylines

Hours before the 2017-18 season gets set to tip off, here are some storylines to follow for Tuesday’s games.

Dennis Chambers

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The long summer is over. We finally made it. NBA opening night is upon us.

Rejoice, hoop heads.

Because the NBA is a perfect concoction of chaos at all times, Tuesday’s opening night slate has some can’t-miss built in headlines that the entire league is going to be glued to.

With a new year set to begin, everyone is on the same page. Whether that page includes the likes of Kevin Durant and Steph Curry or Doug McDermott and Tim Hardaway Jr. is a different story. But still, Tuesday marks day one for all teams and as it stands they’re all equal.

As we get set to sit down and dissect these opening game matchups on Tuesday, let’s highlight the most intriguing storylines that will be followed for the rest of the season. There’s nothing like watching a story grown in the NBA from its inception, right?

Boston Celtics vs. Cleveland Cavaliers — 8 p.m. ET (TNT)

This is the game we’ve all been waiting for since late June, when Kyrie Irving let it be known to Cavs owner Dan Gilbert that he wanted out from under LeBron’s shadow.

Three years of NBA Finals appearances, the greatest comeback in basketball history, and a ring to show for was all Irving wanted to walk away from. For him, he felt it was his time to shine.

And because the NBA is the perfect mix of beautiful insanity, it would only make sense that Irving would get dealt to the very team that is jostling for position to unseat the Cavs and King James.

The Irving-led Boston Celtics will have to wait a grand total of one second in the new NBA season to begin their matchup with their point guards old teammates and the team that stands in between them a Finals appearance. With Gordon Hayward and Irving together for the first time against meaningful competition, there’s no better way than to check their fit from the jump than by challenging the conference champions in their building.

But Irving’s homecoming isn’t the only storyline heading into the first game of the season. There are some changes on Cleveland’s end as well.

While the main return for Irving — Isaiah Thomas — won’t be suiting up for the Cavs anytime soon due to injury, there are still plenty of new faces to keep an eye on Tuesday night. First and foremost, Flash is in town. After having his contract bought out by the Chicago Bulls, Dwyane Wade joined forces with his buddy in The Land in hopes of recapturing some of the magic that led them to two championships in South Beach.

By teaming up once again, James and Wade provide some of the best chemistry in the league. Yes, Wade isn’t the player he once was when he and James were winning rings. But something is to be said for knowing exactly where someone will be on the court at all times, and that’s the trait exactly that Wade and James share.

Along with Wade, James and the Cavs are hoping to get some type of resurgence from Derrick Rose and Jeff Green off of the bench. Once Thomas returns to the court for Cleveland, this is arguably the deepest team James has ever been around in Cleveland.

Even with Irving and Hayward on board, Boston will be relying on some role players of their own — namely Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown. The back-to-back third overall picks will occupy most of the time at the forward spots opposite of Hayward. As the season moves on, the development of both of these wings will be crucial to how dangerous the Celtics can be past their two star players.

Tuesday night will be must-see television at Quicken Loans Arena. New eras for the Eastern Conference heavyweights are about to begin.

And as James told ESPN’s Rachel Nichols, “The Kid” will be just fine.

Houston Rockets vs. Golden State Warriors — 10:30 p.m. ET (TNT)

On the Western side of the basketball landscape Tuesday night, the potential conference finals matchup will see its first act when the revamped Rockets head to the Bay Area.

Last season at this time, the basketball world was bracing for what the Warriors would look like after adding Kevin Durant to a 73-win team. And as expected, they dominated. Not even LeBron James could put a stop to them, managing just one win in their finals bout.

This year brings in more of the same questions. Can anyone stop the Warriors? Will Golden State just steamroll their way to another championship, effectively sucking the fun of competition out of the entire league?

Well, a few teams this offseason did their best to try and combat that narrative. One of them being the Rockets, who they added perennial all-star point guard Chris Paul to their backcourt.

Putting Paul in the same backcourt as superstar James Harden has the potential to create some of the biggest headaches for opposing teams. The constant ball movement and open looks the two star guards can provide are nearly endless.

While the league swoons over the Warriors’ ability to hit shots from well beyond the arc, it should be noted that it was Houston last year that led the NBA in three-point shooting, not Golden State. It’s certainly not wise to try and go toe-to-toe with the Warriors at their own game, but if there’s ever a team equipped to do it, it’s Houston. Tuesday night will provide a nice preview look at how things in the Western Conference could shake out in the coming months.

Aside from the barrage of scoring that will take place in this matchup, what would a big game be for the Warriors without a little Draymond Green trash talk?

After Rockets head coach Mike D’Antoni told ESPN that, “You’re not gonna stop them. It’s just not gonna happen. They’re not gonna stop us, either,” Green clapped back with a comment of his own, as he always does.

“I don’t know how serious they take defense with that comment,” Green said. “But they added some good defensive players.”

It’s true, the Rockets aren’t considered a defensive stalwart by any means. Last season, Houston was 26th in points allowed, compared to second in points scored. Green may be onto something when it comes to questioning how serious his opponents take defense.

That being said, last year’s Rockets didn’t feature Paul. Even at the age of 32, Paul is still one of the league’s best on-ball defenders. And no matter his age, he’ll always possess that competitive fire he’s been known for over the last 12 years.

Going up against the Warriors at Oracle is usually nothing short of impossible, but if there’s going to be a team to challenge their supremacy this season, we’ll get a good look at how they stack up on night one.

With all of this in mind, let’s not forget that the world’s best league is finally back in action. Give yourself a pat on the back, you made it. Now, go enjoy some basketball.

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NBA AM: Is It Smart To Bet On Yourself In This Market?

Many extension-eligible players opted to bet on themselves and a questionable free agent marketplace next summer.

Steve Kyler

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No Big Surprises On Draft Extensions

The big news yesterday wasn’t a new extension for a 2014 first round draft pick, it was the news that the San Antonio Spurs reached a three-year, $72 million extension with veteran LaMarcus Aldridge.

The news was surprising for a couple of reasons. The biggest being the Spurs had shopped Aldridge in trade scenarios this offseason under the idea that he was a problematic fit for the Spurs.

Ultimately, Aldridge and the Spurs ended up in the same place on his deal. The Spurs were not going to be big free agent players and locking Aldridge in now gives them some security as well as trade leverage later. In Aldridge’s case, his camp saw the marketplace this past summer and all of the mouths that need to be fed in July and realized he wasn’t likely getting more money on the open market come free agency.

One of the things the Spurs found out was that trading a player with a player option is not an easy task as teams that would give up value want to know what comes next, either way. Over the past few years, player options have become almost toxic in trade, mainly because there are two classes of trade partners, one that wants the ending contract and a player for a stretch run in the postseason and teams that want the player for next season. The options make valuing the player sticky at best.

In doing a deal for Aldridge, the Spurs basically lock him into their roster for this season but give themselves a trade chip next summer, if they need it. This was smart for both sides. The Spurs locked in the player and the trade asset, Aldridge locked in money he likely wouldn’t have gotten in the open market.

For those players drafted in the first round of the 2014 NBA Draft, yesterday closed the window on the “Early Extension Period.” While there were talks all the way to the wire on several players, the bulk of the deals that didn’t get done didn’t get close enough to seal the deal.

The Boston Celtics and Marcus Smart frequently talked about an extension, and his camp labeled the talks as getting “close” but ultimately, future luxury tax concerns killed a possible deal before the extension deadline, meaning Smart will hit free agency in July.

The Celtics will have a couple of months to see if Smart continues to evolve before they have to make decisions, and they now know what a deal would take for Smart to sign outright. Given the Celtics tax concerns, there is a window for a team with cap space to poach him in July if they come with the right kind of offer sheet. While the Celtics can obtain the right to match Smart with a $6.53 million qualifying offer, the tax issues won’t go away without a cap dump of a trade. Equally, the Celtics roster is loaded with point guards, so the C’s have the luxury of seeing what unfolds in the next three months before the February 8 trade deadline.

The Orlando Magic and their pair of 2014 draftees, Aaron Gordon and Elfird Payton, talked about extensions, mostly out of courtesy. The Magic would have done deals if it favored the team, but the new front office in Orlando has been open and honest that they are still very much in evaluation mode on the roster and were not going to pay a premium at this point.

The Magic’s reluctance to do a deal wasn’t about valuing either player as both are said to have been very good so far, this preseason. The Magic don’t have a clear-cut direction yet and inking a long-term deal with either would have been counter to their goal of flexibility. Equally, the Magic also know that both players are unlikely to get huge free agent offers unless they blossom this season, which would make matching an easier decision after seeing how they play this season.

Neither player entered the process expecting to reach a deal, so there is no ill-will about not getting an extension. Both players have said publicly and privately they knew they had to earn their next deal and came into camp with that mindset.

The Utah Jazz and guard Rodney Hood engaged on an extension most of the summer. The Jazz are very committed to Hood, but would not commit to a deal at this point for a bunch of reasons, the biggest being they don’t really know what the team is yet. Hood is going to get a big opportunity this year, and the Jazz want to see if he can handle the increased load and stay healthy. Injuries have ravaged the Jazz lately, and they were reluctant to lock in a big number to a player that hasn’t been durable.

Of the bunch, Hood is the most likely to get a deal without the restricted free agent offer sheet process next summer—the Jazz may simply pony up and pay him if he can fill the void they hope he can for the team.

The Milwaukee Bucks and injured forward Jabari Parker did talk about an extension despite him having torn his ACL for the second time. The Bucks looked at the idea of locking Parker in at a value, but ultimately, neither side got close enough for it to be realistic. Parker is expected to return to action sometime in February, meaning he may log enough games for a big deal in July to be realistic, especially if the Bucks are as good as they project to be this year and land home court in the postseason.

The big hurdle for all of the players that did not get an extension is that the free agent marketplace in July does not project to be as robust as it was even last year. A number of agents urged their clients to take the security of money on the table this summer, and many players opted to bet on themselves, which always sounds like a great idea until the reality of restricted free agency sets in.

Nerlens Noel and JaMychal Green were both causalities of a shrinking marketplace this past summer. It will be interesting to see if some of the players that got close this week get less in the open market in July.

More Twitter: Make sure you are following all of our guys on Twitter to ensure you are getting the very latest from our team: @stevekylerNBA, @MikeAScotto, @LangGreene, @EricPincus, @joelbrigham, @TommyBeer, @MokeHamilton@jblancartenba, @Ben_Dowsett, @SpinDavies, @BuddyGrizzard, @JamesB_NBA, @DennisChambers_ and @Ben__Nadeau.

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NBA PM: Hornets Rookies May Become Key Contributors

Some key injuries may force Charlotte’s rookies into becoming effective role players earlier than expected, writes James Blancarte.

James Blancarte

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As the NBA finally gets underway tomorrow evening, the 2017 rookie draft class will get their first taste of regular season action. Teams reliant on young rookie talent might produce an exciting brand of basketball but that rarely translates into a winning formula. Having rookies play a key role for a team hoping to make the playoffs can be a risky endeavor.

Out West, the Los Angeles Lakers are relying on both Lonzo Ball as well as Kyle Kuzma, who may have worked his way into the rotation with his surprising preseason play. However, the Lakers are, at this point, not realistic contenders in the competitive Western Conference. In the East, the Philadelphia 76ers have more realistic playoff hopes. The team is relying on this year’s top overall draft pick, Markelle Fultz, and 2016’s top pick, Ben Simmons, for meaningful production. Although Simmons has been in the league for over a year, he is still classified as a rookie for this season since he didn’t play last season.

The Charlotte Hornets are looking to return to the playoffs after narrowly missing the cut this past season. The team will likely feature not one, but two true rookies as a part of their regular rotation. Like the Lakers, the Hornets feature a highly touted rookie with the talent and poise to contribute right away in Malik Monk. The team also features Dwayne Bacon, a rookie that has flashed scoring potential as well as maturity — key attributes that will allow him to quickly contribute to the team.

Both players will be given the opportunity to contribute as a result of the unfortunate and untimely injury to forward Nicolas Batum. Batum tore a ligament in his left elbow in an October 4 preseason game against the Detroit Pistons. Initial speculation was that the injury would require surgery. However, it was announced on October 10 that surgery would not be necessary, and that he is projected to return in six to eight weeks. Assuming that there are no setbacks in Batum’s recovery, the Hornets will be looking to replace his perimeter scoring, playmaking abilities and perimeter defense. Enter Monk and Bacon.

Monk and Bacon have both shown the ability to score the ball, which is not exactly a common trait in Hornets rookies. Bacon, the 40th pick in the 2017 NBA draft, has made it a point to look for his shot from the outside, averaging 7.8 three-point shots per game while knocking down 33.3 percent of his attempts. As Bacon gains more experience, he presumably will learn how to get cleaner looks at the basket within the flow of the team’s offense. Doing so should help him increase his shooting percentage from beyond the arc, which would turn him into an even more effective contributor for Charlotte.

Bacon spoke to reporters after a recent preseason game against the Boston Celtics. Bacon was placed in the starting lineup and went 4-4 from three-point range in 34 minutes of action.

When asked what are some of the things he wanted to work on, Bacon focused on one end of the court in particular.

“Definitely defense. I’m trying to perfect the defensive side, I want to be one of the best two-way players to ever play the game,” Bacon stated. “I feel like I got the offensive side so just keep getting better on defense, I’ll be fine.”

Lack of consistency and defense are key factors that prevent many rookies from playing and being successful on winning teams right away. Based on Bacon’s size (6-foot-6, 221 pounds with a long wingspan) and physicality, he has the physical tools necessary to play passable defense. Combine that with his ability to score (he led the team in scoring in three of its five preseason games) and the unfortunate injury to Batum, it’s apparent that Bacon will get an opportunity to make the rotation and contribute.

Reliable two-way players on the wing are crucially important, but are not always readily available and are even less common on cheap contracts. The Los Angeles Clippers went through the entire Chris Paul/Blake Griffin era swapping small forwards on a nearly annual basis, struggling to find this kind of contribution from the wing. With little cap flexibility, the Clippers were unable to acquire a forward that could effectively and consistently play both end of the court, which caused issues over the years. As a second round pick, Bacon is set to make $815,615 in his first year. If Bacon is able to contribute at even a league average level, that will be a major boost for the shorthanded Hornets. Bacon is smart to focus on improving as a defender as Steve Clifford is a defensive-minded coach who will leave talented players on the bench if they aren’t making a positive impact on the defensive end of the court.

In fact, Clifford offered some strong simultaneous praise and criticism of Monk when it came to his scoring and defense.

“He can score, he can score, he can score [speaking of Monk],” Clifford stated. “I think his defense will come because he’s willing, he’s a good guy. I think that being a good player is very important to him.”

It’s apparent in Clifford’s comment that he values scoring, but that defense is also extremely important and essential to any player that wants to be a “good player.”

“He knows and understands that the way he has played in the past [in college], he can’t play in this league if he wants to be a good player,” Clifford said about Monk. “The big thing is, I told him, when people say, ‘he’s a talented offensive player’ that is a lot different than somebody saying, ‘he’s a talented NBA player.’”

Point guard Michael Carter-Williams also suffered an injury (bone bruise in his left knee), which received less attention than Batum’s injury. While Carter-Williams is not the same caliber of player as Batum, the Hornets are alarmingly thing at backup point guard. Without Carter-Williams, the team was going to lean on Batum to act as a playmaker more than he has in the past, which would have, at least in part, addressed the lack of an established backup point guard. But with Batum sidelined, Coach Clifford has given Monk time at the point guard position. If Monk proves capable of playing both guard positions and playing alongside Walker, that could go a long way towards mitigating the loss of Batum and Carter-Williams. It’s not reasonable to expect Monk (or Bacon) to produce as consistently as a seasoned veteran, but having them contribute at a league average level would constitute a big win for a Charlotte team with serious playoff aspirations.

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