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Basketball Insiders Week in Review 12/13

Basketball Insiders looks at some articles from last week in case you missed any the first time around.

Kyle Cape-Lindelin

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Will Harrison Barnes Re-Sign?

By Moke Hamilton

Already, the 2015-16 NBA season has been full of surprises. Many people believed the New Orleans Pelicans and Washington Wizards were ready to take the next step forward, but thus far, each team has shown evidence of serious regression.

The Houston Rockets were thought to have an opportunity to compete for the Western Conference crown, but instead, on December 6, they will enter play merely one game ahead of the Portland Trail Blazers—a team that not even Damian Lillard’s mother thought had a chance of qualifying for the playoffs out West.

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Ranking the NBA’s Southwest Teams

By Jonathan Concool

The Southwest division was by far the most competitive division in the NBA during the 2014-2015 season as all five teams (Houston Rockets, Memphis Grizzlies, San Antonio Spurs, Dallas Mavericks, New Orleans Pelicans) qualified for the playoffs. Coming into this season much of the same was expected out of the Southwest division as every team looked like they improved their roster or kept it relatively the same, except for Dallas, who lost out on free agent DeAndre Jordan. Well, things have not gone as expected for the Southwest division this year as the Pelicans find themselves at 4-15, the Rockets are two games below .500, and even Memphis got off to a slow start as they find themselves at 11-9 thus far.

Let’s take a look at these teams and see how they rank through the first quarter of the season.

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Markieff Morris on the Move?

By Alex Kennedy

Markieff Morris made headlines over the offseason when he publicly demanded a trade from the Phoenix Suns and insisted that he wouldn’t play for the team during the 2015-16 season.

Morris was upset that the Suns had traded his twin brother, Marcus, to the Detroit Pistons during the summer. The Morris twins had each just signed an extension to remain with Phoenix, but the agreement was very unique. Rather than signing the two players separately, the Suns allotted $52 million to re-signing the twins and allowed the brothers to decide how they’d split the money. At the end of the day, Markieff ended up with a four-year deal worth $32 million and Marcus received a four-year deal worth $20 million.

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Ranking the NBA’s Central Teams

By Joel Brigham

A quarter of the way through the NBA season and three Central Division teams – Cleveland, Chicago and Indiana – are among the top four teams in the Eastern Conference. Not to mention, Detroit has played well early on too, and Milwaukee also are more talented than their record indicates thus far.

Today we wrap up our series on ranking the divisions at the quarter-point of the season by taking a look at those Central Division teams that have generally been so impressive:

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Things are Turning Around for the Memphis Grizzlies

By Cody Taylor

One of the most surprising teams of this young season has been the Memphis Grizzlies. Unfortunately for the Grizzlies, their start to the season wasn’t exactly what they had in mind. After all, this was a team that felt extremely confident that they could make a run with their existing roster, opting to keep it intact over the summer, rather than making wholesale changes.

Their biggest move of the summer was locking in center Marc Gasol for an additional five seasons. They also made a couple of smaller moves by adding Matt Barnes and Brandan Wright. Given how strong the team chemistry has been in the past, it was a bit concerning to see how they began the year after initially being projected as a contender in the Western Conference.

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Change Of Direction For The 76ers?

By Steve Kyler

Yesterday, the Philadelphia 76ers named former Phoenix Suns majority owner and current USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo to the post of Chairman of Basketball Operations. His role will also include being an adviser to 76ers majority owner Josh Harris.

As the dust on this move settles, there are few things worth talking about.

This move likely isn’t going to change much in the short-term, as current General Manager Sam Hinkie will continue to run the day-to-day operations of the team. However, in the long-term, league sources believe that Colangelo will be putting not only his stamp on the team, but also will be very active in recruiting and shaping the team’s roster going forward beyond this season.

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Thaddeus Young In It for Long Haul

By Jessica Camerato

Three years into his NBA career, Thaddeus Young began to notice a change. In what felt like a sudden shift, players he was used to seeing around the NBA were no longer around. They weren’t retired or even toward the end of their career; they were out of the league seemingly just as soon as they had arrived. It was an awakening to the reality of how fast a player’s NBA career can end.

Young entered the NBA in 2007 as the 12th overall pick selected by the Philadelphia 76ers. Early on, he attended meetings on how to prepare for life in the league, which included data on the average lifespan of a player. At the time, he learned it was just over four years – a figure he still recalls in his ninth season.

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Pacers Thriving Despite Roster Changes

By Lang Greene

From 2012 to 2014, the Indiana Pacers emerged as an annual playoff thorn in the side of the Miami HEAT in that franchise’s quest to reach the NBA Finals. Those Pacers amassed an impressive 147-82 (.641) record and two trips to the Eastern Conference Finals before finishing the 2014-15 campaign a woeful 38-44 and missing the playoffs.

Last season’s demise was expected as former All-Star forward Paul George missed all but six games after suffering a gruesome leg injury while participating with Team USA the previous summer.

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The NBA’s Best Out-of-Bounds Sets and Coaches

By Ben Dowsett

Evaluating the day-in, day-out job of an NBA coach from a media perch will always be a supremely incomplete exercise. There’s just a ton of stuff that goes on within the confines of a given coach’s responsibilities that we’ll never see or hear about, and often some of the details herein are the biggest differentiators between what makes a good coach and a bad one.

There are bits of visible minutiae that allow us to judge a partial picture, though. Some of these are related to things like player development, in-game rotations, offensive and defensive schemes, and other elements – though even in these areas, player execution and other confounding factors will still always be at play. Over the years, though, one area that’s become a fun way to examine one distinct skill in a given coach’s arsenal has been looking at his team’s success on plays where coaches can have some of the largest tangible impact: out-of-bounds sets, particularly following timeouts and even more particularly in high-leverage situations.

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How the NBA’s Top Shooters Do Their Damage

By Eric Saar

The three-point shot has become a centerpiece of basketball. Even though shooters typically aren’t as tall, strong or athletic as their peers, they can make just as much (or even more) of an impact on a game, particularly in today’s NBA.

The three-point shot stretches the defense, creating driving lanes for guards, and in recent years we’ve seen a new era of the stretch-four. These days (with a few exceptions) teams want a power forward who can shoot from mid-to-long range. The three-point line can swing games as a player can get hot and knock down several in a row, shifting momentum. That arc can help eliminate deficits in a matter of minutes, making games closer and more exciting. It’s also exhilarating to watch the automatic and effortless accuracy of these sharpshooters.

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Byron Scott Failing on Multiple Levels

By Jesse Blancarte

The Los Angeles Lakers are one of a handful of NBA teams that have a core of young and promising talent. The other teams on the list are the Utah Jazz, Minnesota Timberwolves, Philadelphia 76ers, Orlando Magic, Portland Trail Blazers and Milwaukee Bucks. Reasonable people can debate which teams have the best young core, but with D’Angelo Russell, Jordan Clarkson, Julius Randle and Larry Nance Jr., Lakers fans have plenty of reasons to be excited about the team’s future.

Despite having a young foundation to build on moving forward, the Lakers’ season, up to this point, has been frustrating and discouraging for Lakers fans – much more so than for fans of the teams listed above. Of course, for a proud franchise like the Lakers, posting a 3-20 record will have that effect. But the disappointment surrounding the franchise’s worst start to a season isn’t at the core of fans’ frustration. Rather, the root of the frustration stems from the Lakers’ front office and its head coach Byron Scott.

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Kyle Cape-Lindelin is based out of Portland, OR covering the NBA while being one of the newsline editors and contributor to "Out of Bounds."

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NBA

NBA Daily: Is Starting That Big Of A Deal?

It’s easy to conclude that a bench player should replace a starter in the lineup if the former is outplaying the latter, but Matt John explains why that may not be the best idea.

Matt John

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Of all the topsy-turvy things that have happened to the Boston Celtics this season, Jaylen Brown’s sudden decline and subsequent comeback might just be the topsiest-turviest thing of them all.

And that’s saying something.

There may not have been a starter in the league who played as badly as he did when the season began. In his first month and a half as the starting shooting guard, Jaylen averaged 11.1 points on 39.8 percent shooting from the field and 25.3 percent from three. That was quite the drop off from his numbers the previous season, where he averaged 14.5 points on 46.5 percent shooting from the field and 39.5 percent from three.

Advanced metrics showed that Brown’s struggles were hurting the Celtics too. Boston was minus-11.9 with Brown on the floor, which was the worst on the team among players who played at least 100 minutes. By December, Brown was benched in favor of Marcus Smart, where the Celtics not so coincidentally started picking things up from there.

Since his move to the bench, Jaylen has regained his footing, averaging 14 points per game on 48.4 percent shooting and 36.3 percent from three. This most recent stretch has been really encouraging for him, as he’s put up 16.4 points a night on 49.5 percent shooting and 40.5 percent from three. Best of all, his play is benefitting the Celtics, as they are plus-6.9 with him on the floor, good for third-best among players who have played 97 or more minutes behind only Al Horford and Gordon Hayward.

His timing couldn’t be better, as the playoffs are just around the corner. Brown playing his best basketball of the season could really help the Celtics’ chances. So one question remains – why not put him back in the starting lineup?

It would make sense. The uptick in Brown’s production has coincided with the diminishment of Marcus Morris’ production.

Morris and Brown have come from opposite ends this summer. While Brown has worked his way up after falling so far down, Morris has descended quite a bit since his brilliant start.

“Mook” was playing the best basketball of his career when the season began. In fact, he was one of the few positives in a season that started as underwhelmingly mediocre as the Celtics had. Through the first two-and-a-half months, Morris was playing like a borderline all-star.

In that time, Morris averaged 15.5 points on 50.1 percent shooting and 44.1 percent from three. The Celtics were plus-5.5 with Morris on the floor, with all of the positivity coming from the offensive end, where the offense was plus-11.6 with him on the floor, second only to Kyrie Irving.

Since then, Morris’ production has tailed off. There was bound to be some regression in Marcus’ case, but since the all-star break, he’s playing what could very well be the worst basketball he’s played since becoming a Celtic.

Since the return from the All-Star break, Morris has averaged 13.1 points on 40 percent shooting from the field and 27 percent from three. The Celtics are minus-17.1 with him on the floor during that span. In other words, he’s hurting them badly on both ends.

So, subbing the slumping Morris for the thriving Brown in the starting lineup would seem like an obvious move to make. The Celtics could do it, and no one would bat an eye, but in this time of the season, it wouldn’t be smart to mess with the lineups this late into the season, or more specifically, it wouldn’t be smart to mess with what’s been working for Brown.

Though it took longer than Boston would have liked, Jaylen Brown has found his stride with the second unit this season. Even if Morris has struggled over the last month or so, taking Brown out of a situation where he’s playing at his best and putting him back into a lineup where he struggled could mess up his mojo. It’s unlikely that Brown will be coming off the bench through the duration of his career, but this season, he was meant to play in the second unit.

There are certain players who, despite having the talent to be a starter, are put in the NBA for the sole purpose of ruling over the second unit. Jamal Crawford and Jason Terry fit that certain mold, but there may not be a player that fits that description better than Lou Williams.

At the age of 32, Williams has already done enough to cement his status as one of the best microwave scorers of all time. The 13,135 points that Williams has scored in his NBA career is good for No.194 among all-time points scored. Last week, he surpassed Dell Curry for the No. 1 all-time scorer off the bench. That is impressive whether he started or not. However, if Lou had been a starter for his entire career, those numbers wouldn’t have as much meaning as they most definitely do as a sixth man.

It’s not as much about having as high scoring numbers in his case. It’s more about the purpose of what those numbers do for his team. Williams’ scoring abilities off the bench give his teams an edge that a fair amount of second units don’t have. His impact offensively is so strong that, like Brown over the past month, he usually winds up finishing games. That’s why having guys like Williams or Brown off the bench is important – They bring an advantage.

Another example would be Williams’ teammate, Montrezl Harrell. Doc Rivers, who has a very solid case for Coach of the Year, has elected to start then-Clipper Marcin Gortat and recently acquired big man Ivica Zubac over Harrell at center this season despite it being very clear that Harrell is his best player in the frontcourt.

He does this because Harrell gives LA an edge in the second unit much like Williams does with the energy he brings to the court. Harrell influences the game so much that again, like Williams, he’s usually out there finishing games as well. His skill set makes him a perfect fit in the second unit, and he could very well be Lou’s best competition for Sixth Man of the Year.

Those are examples of players who could be starters if their team wanted them to. They just play better when they come off the bench, but are there players who – despite being a starting-caliber player – are not a good fit in their starting lineup?

As it turns out, Derrick Favors is one such player. It’s been a much-debated controversy in Utah now about whether Favors should be starting in the frontcourt alongside Rudy Gobert for the Jazz. Honestly, those two aren’t bad together, but they play so much better when they pair up with a floor spacer in the frontcourt instead of each other.

In two-man lineups, Favors and Gobert are a plus-1.4 together. Defensively, the two of them are great together, giving up 98.3 points per 100 possessions. Alas, they only score 99.7 points per 100 possessions. Compare their two-man lineup to one with either Joe Ingles or Jae Crowder.

Favors and Ingles: +6.1
Favors and Crowder: +2.6
Gobert and Ingles: +4.5
Gobert and Crowder: +4.1

To be clear, Favors is good enough to be a starter. He just might not have the best frontcourt partner to be paired with.

When you take all of this in, it’s fair to say that to a certain extent, starting is overrated because it has no bearing on who plays the most minutes. What’s most important really is who finishes the game. Sometimes it’s the starters while at other times, it’s one or two bench players. It all comes down to who is the most reliable.

Because of this, in the Celtics’ case, the more accurate conclusion is that Brown should be getting more minutes than Morris rather than he should be replacing him in the starting lineup. That is, if he keeps this up.

No matter what Boston decides to do, one final question must be brought to our attention – Does anyone else think it’s an odd coincidence that Brown’s and Morris’ productions both started trending in opposite directions after the two of them got into that skirmish back in January?

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March Madness

NBA Daily: Four Prospects Ready To Rise In NCAA Tournament

Every March brings a collection of mock draft risers ahead of combine season, but there are four names worth your attention this spring, writes Ben Nadeau.

Ben Nadeau

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Ah, it’s almost that time of year, folks.

With conference tournaments set to wrap up this weekend, and Selection Sunday not far behind, the mental preparations for the big dance have already begun. Each season, like clockwork, a group of players seemingly raise their stock amongst fans ahead of workouts and the combine. Last season, of course, the largest beneficiary of the bright spotlight was Villanova’s Donte DiVincenzo. During the NCAA Championship, DiVincenzo torched Michigan for 31 points on 5-for-7 from long range — then once he measured out well, it was all but settled. In a matter of two months, DiVincenzo had gone from a near-lock to return to college to a potential lottery selection.

But as Basketball Insiders’ Steve Kyler pointed out alongside his most recent mock draft, importantly, it was a combination of everything that vaulted DiVincenzo into the cultural forefront. With much of the collegiate sphere transfixed, rightfully, on Zion Williamson’s return to Duke, plus his renewed efforts with top prospects Cam Reddish and R.J. Barrett, most of the collective draft class has just slipped on by. So although scouts may have a handle on the NCAA’s very best prospects, there are plenty of other cases worth adding to join to the pre-tournament hype conversation.

Given that March Madness kicks off on Tuesday, there’s no better moment to investigate the portfolios of some potential risers. Again, a stellar showing in the tournament won’t do it alone — but, regardless, these are four players that could do a ton of damage between now and the NBA Draft in June.

Eric Paschall, Villanova

Speaking of DiVincenzo, the Wildcats have sent a handful of players to the NBA over the last three years and senior Eric Paschall appears to be next in line. The 6-foot-8 forward bided his time alongside stars like Mikal Bridges and Jalen Brunson, but the former All-Tournament selectee has bloomed as Villanova’s main man. Over 32 contests, Paschall has averaged 16.7 points, 6.2 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 2.1 three-pointers per game, helming his now-depleted squad to 23 wins.

Although he hasn’t collected the same awards that Brunson did last year, NBA teams tend to love ready-to-contribute Wildcats, no matter their age.

Paschall will be 23 once his rookie year begins in the fall but he’s got big-game confidence and oodles of experience already. On Thursday, Paschall scored 20 points and 10 rebounds to pace No. 25 Villanova past Providence in Big East Tournament play. There are some concerns over his pro-level fit as a power forward, but his massively improved three-point conversion mark will definitely have scouts back on board.

Of note, Paschall was unanimously named to the All-Big East First Team and he’s currently heating up ahead of another deep Villanova run. Paschall’s fantastic put-back helped the Wildcats force overtime against Xavier on Friday, while his clutch three-pointer and subsequent free throws then iced it.

Jaxson Hayes, Texas

Texas’ newest rim-protecting impact player is the 6-foot-11 Jaxson Hayes — a well-executing shot blocker and walking highlight reel… sound familiar? While the comparisons to Jarrett Allen are simply unavoidable at this point, Hayes has been a worthy target alone based on his slow, but steady improvement throughout the 2018-19 campaign. Through 32 games, the freshman has averaged 10.1 points, 5.1 rebounds and 2.2 blocks on 72.8 percent from the field. Those standout numbers — blocks and field goal percentage — rank as 23rd and second-best in Division I, respectively.

In Hayes’ best performance yet, the big man pulled down 15 points, six rebounds and five blocks during a mid-season victory over rival Oklahoma. Earlier this month, Hayes was named the Big 12 Freshman of the Year, an honor recently bestowed upon Trae Young, Josh Jackson and Myles Turner. Along with Allen and Turner, Haynes joins Mohamed Bamba as highly-rated former Longhorns with huge professional-level projections — that’s not bad company to keep.

Unfortunately, at 16-16, Texas now faces an uphill battle to even reach the big dance. Much worse, Hayes played just 14 minutes before leaving the game with an injury during their loss to No. 3 Kansas in the Big 12 Tournament on Thursday. Head coach Shaka Smart said he hoped “it’s not extremely serious” but a status update has not been revealed as of publishing. However, as an athletic leaper and instinctual defender, Hayes remains one of the top long-term projects, injured or not.

And with moments like these, it won’t be long until the country takes notice as well — even if he’s sadly done for the season now.

Tre Jones, Duke

Of the names on this list, Tre Jones’ line is certainly the least jaw-dropping — 8.9 points, 5.4 assists and 2.1 steals — but he’s been the fourth mouth to feed behind the Blue Devils’ trio of future top five picks. Still, Jones has been a steadying force for the star-studded side, even seeing a healthy uptick in the three weeks that Williamson was sidelined. During Duke’s slim loss to North Carolina a week ago, Jones chipped in with nine points, five rebounds, seven assists and two steals.

With Williamson back in the lineup versus Syracuse on Thursday, Jones dropped 15 points and eight assists — which, long story short, proves the court general is good no matter who is on the floor. While those statistics aren’t enough to push Jones into lottery territory, the 19-year-old point guard has some promising upside for a team with less ball-dominating assets already.

Although head coach Mike Krzyzewski‎ dreams of a sophomore year return, Jones’ laser-sharp distribution and above-average defense will make him a popular name this spring. Jones’ 3.73 assist-to-turnover ratio is third-best in the entire nation and his ability to drop picture-perfect passes to Duke’s sky-walking dunkers has made them appointment viewing all season.

And if you’re feeling some slight déjà vu right now, that’s for good reason. Back in 2014-15, Tyus Jones, Tre’s older brother, was an electric playmaker for a Blue Devils team that won it all. But if you see Tre knocking down important, pressure-laden shots like Tyus once did, don’t be surprised — that clutch gene still runs in the family.

Jaylen Nowell, Washington

This foursome has covered nearly every corner of the scouting conundrum checklist thus far: Hayes? Too raw. Paschall? Too old. Jones? Too underutilized. While those are all things that front offices may eventually look past when drafting those three in June, Jaylen Nowell falls into zero of those buckets.

Nowell is 19 years old, just won Pac-12 Player of the Year and seems poised to lead Washington to their longest tournament run in over a decade. Heading into the postseason, Nowell is leading the Huskies in points (16.5), assists (3.1) and three-point percentage (44.9), while the guard is their runner-up in rebounds (5.4) and steals (1.2) too. Uncoincidentally, Washington’s 25 wins are the most the college has finished with since Isaiah Thomas led them to 26 and the Sweet 16 in 2009-2010.

In 2018-19, Nowell has topped 18 or more on 15 separate occasions, including a massive 26-point, six-rebound effort against the likely No. 1 overall-seeded Gonzaga Bulldogs. Nowell is an incredible dribbler and the sophomore has put plenty of talented defenders on skates — but he’s also been largely hidden in a subpar conference this season. Fundamentally strong, Nowell has shot below 40 percent in just five of Washington’s 32 games so far.

Consistent and reliable, he’ll be their go-to star in the NCAA tournament without a doubt. Before long, the rest of the country will recognize him as one too.

Zion Williamson has been deservedly tough to look away from this season — but collegiate basketball’s biggest showstopper has robbed onlookers of some other incredible narratives as well.

Whether that’s the scrappy lead guard throwing alley-oops to Williamson on the daily, a forgotten National Champion or a budding first-rounder on the opposite coastline, March Madness is shaping up to be another worthy runway for takeoff. Unfortunately, Hayes will likely miss out — even in the now-unlikely circumstance that Texas is selected — but his agile, smooth skillset as a near seven-footer will make him a sought-after interview come draft season.

Between now and April — through a mix of their tournament efforts and combine measurements — an elite group of prospects will rise up mock draft boards once again. Who will it be this year?

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NBA

NBA Daily: What’s Next for Isaiah Thomas?

Shane Rhodes breaks down the situation Isaiah Thomas faces as he is no longer in the Denver Nuggets’ rotation.

Shane Rhodes

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“That Slow Grind” seems to have ground to a halt.

Always a fighter, the former “Mr. Irrelevant” battled through stints with the Sacramento Kings and Phoenix Suns before he ended up in the ideal situation with the Boston Celtics. As he came into his own, the diminutive Isaiah Thomas positioned himself for an enormous payday. But it never came.

In the midst of a, to say the least, gutsy 2017 postseason performance, Thomas aggravated a hip injury that ended his season and has continued to affect him to this day.

The Celtics traded Thomas that summer to the Cleveland Cavaliers in exchange for Kyrie Irving (as part of a larger trade). Unable to carve out a consistent role, Thomas was then traded to the Los Angeles Lakers. There, he flashed that burst that enabled one of the most prolific offensive seasons in NBA history, but his season ended as it started; Thomas again found himself under the knife, forced to undergo surgery on his deteriorating hip.

Things still haven’t gotten better for him. With the Denver Nuggets, Thomas’ has hit the latest roadblock in what has been an uphill battle back to relevancy.

On February 13, 2019, Thomas debuted for the Nuggets to a standing ovation. From there, it took just nine games for Head Coach Mike Malone to remove him from the rotation. Now, the once great Thomas has been relegated to that of a veteran locker room presence and source of postseason experience. To his credit, Thomas has taken the change in stride, but his future NBA prospects continue to darken.

There are a number of different routes Thomas’ career could take out of Denver this offseason, but what exactly could be next for “The Little Guy?”

As he has become accustomed to, Thomas must persevere in order to continue his NBA dream and he’ll arguably have to do it somewhere other than Denver; the two just aren’t compatible. Thomas, at his best, dominated the ball while Denver, led by Malone and Nikola Jokic, run an offense based on fluidity and movement. If Thomas’ eventual goal is a return to form, or something close to it, he must find a team with an abundance of available guard minutes and one that can take the time to allow Thomas to find his footing again, a team desperate for the scoring punch that Thomas could provide once his feet are under him.

Multiple teams seem to fit that description, including the Phoenix Suns, Orlando Magic and others that lack an effective weapon off the bench.

Thomas could also, as it were, steer into the skid. His career would take a form far different than what he had always envisioned, but it may be the best and most meaningful way for Thomas to remain connected to the NBA. Were he to come to the conclusion that he may not be able to get back to the player he used to be, Thomas could embrace the role that he has found for himself and look to continue in it in the future, either in Denver or elsewhere. The wealth of experience Thomas could provide a team — both from a personal and NBA perspective — could prove invaluable to a young team faced with hardship, mounting expectations or a number of other potential problems.

Likewise, Thomas’ veteran presence and knowledge of the postseason could provide an edge to almost any contender — anything Thomas contributed outside of the locker room would be a bonus.

Thomas could also forgo both of those options and look to rebuild his value in Europe or China before coming back to the NBA as well. Assuming he can maintain his health, Thomas would almost certainly flourish overseas, as many NBA players do, and parlay that into a potential NBA contract.

Thomas, never one to back away from a challenge, would almost certainly look for an NBA opportunity before making a decision that could drastically alter his future. Since he was drafted, the 5’9 point guard has been told that he couldn’t make it in the NBA and, while the circumstances have changed, it would seem out of character for Thomas to just give in to the doubters.

Whatever he does in the end, expect basketball to be in Thomas’ future, in some way, shape or form. Through it all, his passion for the game has never wavered and, while some may see this as the beginning of the end, it would seem foolish to doubt Thomas now.

He certainly won’t be doubting himself.

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