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NBA Daily: In a Revamped East, Can the Celtics Still Compete?

The Eastern Conference title contenders made big moves at the trade deadline. Shane Rhodes breaks down how it will impact the Celtics.

Shane Rhodes

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First, the Philadelphia 76ers acquired Tobias Harris.

Next, the Milwaukee Bucks added Nikola Mirotic.

Then, the Toronto Raptors traded for Marc Gasol.

And, with their sights set on a potential offseason blockbuster, Danny Ainge and the Boston Celtics stood pat as they watched their main competition drastically improve at the February 7 Trade Deadline.

At 35-20 — good for fourth place in the East — a blockbuster wasn’t a necessity for the Celtics. The hodgepodge of battle-tested veterans and fresh-legged youth that make up the Celtics roster has shown they are a force to be reckoned with. Boston is 23-10 since December 1, one of the best records in the NBA over that span, and should continue to do so down the stretch.

But an Eastern Conference arms race, one that they were unable to get involved in, may have been the worst possible outcome for the Celtics in a season that already hasn’t gone their way.

Boston had, on paper, one of the best rosters in the NBA at the start of the season. Kyrie Irving, Al Horford and Gordon Hayward were All-Star caliber players, while Jayson Tatum, Jaylen Brown, Terry Rozier were a talented trio that had carried themselves to within a few victories of the NBA’s apex last season. Healthy and on the cusp of it all, Boston was projected to reach even greater heights this season.

But that’s why they play the games, isn’t it?

The team flopped out of the gate to the tune of a 10-10 start. Hayward has looked like a shell of himself as he has struggled to return from a devastating leg injury. Rozier has regressed in his transition back to a reserve role. And, after a preseason declaration, Irving has seemingly made an about-face on his commitment to the team beyond this season. Things have certainly improved since; the defense has consistently looked like one of the best units in the NBA; the offense has turned things around after a dreadful start; and Brown, after some early-season hand injury, has almost completely rebounded to the player he was last postseason. But, with the infusion of star power brought on by the deadline, can this Boston squad still compete for the Larry O’Brien trophy?

The short answer? Yes, but Brad Stevens and Co. will need things to break right in order to do so.

To start, the bench must find some consistency. They have impressed at times, but there have been more than a few games where the starting unit has put them ahead, only for the bench to let a big lead slip away. That can’t happen in the postseason when the best are going up against the best and any weakness will get exploited by the opposition.

Next up, Stevens has to step up and take control of his own team. While he is lauded for his after-timeout magics, Stevens has struggled in several areas this season; too often the offense will get bogged down, ball movement will cease, and it is on Stevens to better scheme his players into opportunities for success. He has to learn when to rein in his locker room at times as well. Irving’s comments about his upcoming free agency, combined with the constant trade chatter and individual agendas or egos on the team, have already created some public scuffles. To this point, Stevens has given little more than a shrug and the occasional stock answer. If this team wants to compete for an NBA title, he has to do better.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, Hayward must find himself on the court. There have been flashes of the pre-injury forward, but far too often Hayward will come out flat and finish games with a less-than-stellar stat line. His passing has been exceptional and his defense adequate, even good at times, but the aggression that made him an offensive weapon for the Utah Jazz has been, understandably, non-existent with the Celtics. When forced into contact, Hayward has no drive behind him and, more often than not, will kick the ball out instead of taking it to the basket. That lack of energy has spread to his perimeter game as well – Hayward, who shot 39.8 percent from three in his last season with the Jazz, has on just 31.1 percent of his deep shots this season – and it will continue to affect him until he gets himself right.

If, come April, Hayward has recaptured that self-confidence, he could represent an addition greater than anyone moved at the trade deadline.

Mix all of that in with a little bit of luck in the standings and this Boston roster should be more than capable of living up to some fairly high expectations. The lack of an addition at the deadline was a gamble by Ainge – one that could drastically alter their future outlook – but it may very well pay off if the Celtics can put it all together down the stretch as they bunker down for their next postseason run.

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NBA Daily: Who Is Headed To The Lakers Next?

With the recent departure of both Magic Johnson and Luke Walton, Jordan Hicks takes a look at where the Lakers stand and who they may end up hiring.

Jordan Hicks

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It is hard to pinpoint exactly how the Los Angeles Lakers organization is feeling at the moment. They’ve now missed the playoffs six seasons in a row, their sole star player – although playing really well – is aging and their young core of high-draft picks still hasn’t found any form of consistency – not to mention a fair share of injury problems.

Flashback to the summer of 2018 and things were going great. Magic Johnson – then president of the organization – had just inked the best player in the NBA to a four-year deal. What followed next was certainly interesting.

Instead of pairing LeBron James with a second superstar-caliber player, the Lakers decided to ink the likes of JaVale McGee, Michael Beasley, Rajon Rondo and Lance Stephenson. A lineup of players so diverse and flashy that most couldn’t help but dub them the Meme Team. The nickname, although silly, was absolutely fitting.

By the end of the season, Rondo and McGee were the only players from that group who were making any sort of an impact. Stephenson found himself injured and Beasley found himself out of the NBA altogether.

To the surprise of no one, those players never really meshed well with the young core of Lonzo Ball, Kyla Kuzma, Josh Hart and Brandon Ingram. Their impact wasn’t much better when sharing the court with James.

By the end of it all, the Lakers found themselves 11 games out of the playoffs. LeBron missed 17 crucial games midseason. The Lakers could have very well gone 11-6 during that stretch, but blaming their omission from the playoffs on James’ slightly-more-than-minor injury just masks the real issues.

Yes, the members of the Meme Team were all on expiring deals, but to think the Lakers left all their problems behind is egregious.

Perhaps the worst thing that happened all season was the myriad of rumors during the trade deadline that involved their entire young core and Anthony Davis. Regardless of what you think, the fact of the matter is that the same agent that represents LeBron also represents Davis. The trade never went down, but there were many solidified rumors that the entire young core of the Lakers was offered for Davis.

This clearly had an impact on the roster, as the Lakers post-All-Star break looked like a completely different team. And LeBron returning to the roster didn’t really make a major impact at all.

The reason for all this build up is to really illustrate the issues both the new president of basketball operations, as well as the new head coach, will come into. Recently, Magic Johnson resigned from his position and a few days later Luke Walton was fired. Reports have also surfaced that current general manager Rob Pelinka is the man that now controls most, if not all, of what goes on within the organization.

On Tuesday morning, Colin Cowherd of Fox Sports reported that Los Angeles already has their replacement for team president. Other reports have suggested that Monty Williams and Tyronn Lue are their two preferred options at Head Coach.

With Lue, you basically have an idea of what you’re going to get. Lue and James found success in Cleveland, making the NBA Finals every year they were together, as well as winning one championship. Shortly after James’ departure, Lue was fired.

This isn’t to say Ty Lue is a bad coach. But what you get with Lue is a very LeBronp-focused team. Lue has no problem taking the backseat – in a sense of the word – to James. They seemed to work really well together, and the Lakers surely would be hoping to regenerate the same sort of success the duo found in Cleveland.

Monty Williams, on the other hand, brings with him a rich history in the league and much more experience than Lue. He has served as a head coach with the New Orleans Pelicans, president of the San Antonio Spurs, an assistant on the U.S. National Team and is currently the assistant to Brett Brown in Philadelphia.

It is hard to say who exactly the Lakers favor, but in the same report highlighted previously, Williams could be offered the head coaching job with the 76ers if they don’t make it to the Eastern Conference Finals. That scenario seems very realistic.

Hiring Lue may be the preferred choice of LeBron James. They have a history, LeBron is comfortable with his coaching style, and his LeBron’s career clock is certainly ticking away. He really doesn’t have a season to waste adapting to the coaching style of someone he isn’t familiar with.

Regardless of who the Lakers hire, even Greg Poppovich himself likely couldn’t take the current roster, as-is, to the NBA Finals. They will certainly need to acquire a second star in free agency or, at worst, a slew of high-level role players.

Whomever they decide to go with at head coach – or whoever chooses to accept the job offer – will have a lot on their plate.

But the one glaring positive in all of this? There isn’t – at least arguably – a franchise in the NBA with a deeper history of success than the Los Angeles Lakers. Regardless of the current state of the franchise, the position alone should be coveted by many potential coaching prospects and candidates around the league.

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NBA

NBA Daily: Garrett Temple Fitting In With Clippers

David Yapkowitz sits down with Los Angeles Clippers swingman Garrett Temple to discuss his niche with the team and the culture they’ve established under Doc Rivers.

David Yapkowitz

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It’s been a season of silencing the doubters for the Los Angeles Clippers. Back in October when the NBA season began, you’d be hard pressed to have found anyone that would’ve given them a chance at making the playoffs.

Flash forward to the present, and they not only have made the postseason, but they’re currently tied 1-1 in the first round with the defending champion Golden State Warriors – and with the next two games on their home-court.

Even as recently as the trade deadline, there were people and pundits who doubted them when they traded away Tobias Harris, who was having an All-Star caliber season. But the new guys who arrived in February have been a huge reason why the Clippers continued to win, especially Garrett Temple.

The nine-year veteran began this season in Memphis after having spent the last two years with the Sacramento Kings. When the Clippers dealt Avery Bradley at the deadline, Temple – along with JaMychal Green – was one of the two pieces the Grizzlies sent back.

Temple had been a bit of journeyman prior to his time with the Kings and the four years before with the Washington Wizards. From his rookie season in 2009-10 to 2012-13, he had stints with the Houston Rockets, San Antonio Spurs, Milwaukee Bucks and Charlotte Hornets. When he first arrived in LA, he could tell right away the locker room dynamic.

“It’s great, we have a team where everybody knows their roles, everybody wants to win,” Temple told Basketball Insiders. “Winning is most important here, there’s no egos. We have a team like this where guys are coming together to do whatever coach [Doc Rivers] says. When it’s all about winning, good things can happen.”

And good things did happen. Following the trade deadline, the Clippers went 17-7, including win streaks of five and six games, to finish the season. They were two wins short of winning 50 games.

Temple had a big hand in that, sort of taking over the role Bradley played as the defensive-minded guard, who can stretch the floor and knock down the three.

“Coming off the bench, I give them some defensive energy. I give energy on the offensive end too, in transition, pushing the ball, make my open shots when I’m open,” Temple told Basketball Insiders. “When I get the chance, I make sure I push the pace. But just bringing that energy on the defensive side.”

Defense has been Temple’s strong suit since he’s been in the NBA. At 6-foot-6, he’s got the size to defend both guard positions as well as some small forwards. In this playoff series, he’s got the daunting task of being matched up against Stephen Curry or Klay Thompson.

But defense is something he prides himself on. He isn’t going to back down no matter who is standing across from him. Even as the oldest player in the Clippers locker room, he remains one of their best defenders.

“No question, I’ve prided myself on that since I got in the NBA. It’s part of the reason why I’ve been able to stay in the league,” Temple told Basketball Insiders. “A lot of guys in this league come off the bench and try to score. I pride myself on being that guy on the bench unit that can defend any three positions on the court.”

Since coming over to the Clippers, Temple has been averaging 4.7 points in 19.7 minutes per game. Normally a reliable three-point threat, his shooting numbers have dipped a bit. He’s down to 29.6 percent from three.

None of the team played well enough to mention in Game 1. But in the Game 2 thrilling comeback, Temple gave solid contributions of seven points, knocking down both his free throws and knocking down one of his two attempts from three-point range.

“You don’t fix what’s not broken, you continue to do what you do, whatever’s your strength,” Temple told Basketball Insiders. “Obviously there’s different transitions and different lingo, but at the end of the day, it’s just basketball. I find myself getting comfortable with what our coaches like us to do on the defensive end and offensive end, and trying to fit in well.”

It remains to be seen what happens in this series against the Warriors, but one thing is for sure – the Clippers definitely have Golden State’s attention. To this group, though, the fact that they were able to pull off a historic comeback probably isn’t surprising to them. They’ve prided themselves all season on having this tough mentality.

Temple recognized it right away before the playoffs even began. When he was in Memphis, he experienced the ‘Grit and Grind’ culture of hard-nosed basketball that the team had embraced. He noticed a similar time vibe with the Clippers, a vibe he knew would make them scary come playoff time.

“Just the fact that everybody is hungry, everybody understands their role. There’s no question from anybody what they’re supposed to do when they get on the court. It’s tough when you have a team that just got together,” Temple told Basketball Insiders.

“I think the biggest thing is we know what everybody does. We have enough firepower offensively, we have enough defensive pieces, and we have a Hall-of-Fame coach. We have a good recipe to be somebody to be reckoned with.”

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Mock Drafts

NBA Daily: 60-Pick NBA Mock Draft – 4/16/19

The deadline to declare for the 2019 NBA draft is April 29th, however, most of the notable prospects have already declared and started the training and preparation process. Steve Kyler offers up his latest weekly 60-Pick Mock Draft.

Steve Kyler

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Let the chaos begin!

The 2019 NBA Draft class has taken on more of a defined shape with the bulk of the expected early entry players having already declared for the draft, with several already in pre-draft gyms training and preparing for the marathon pre-draft process that will play out over the next 65 days.

There are a few dates to keep in mind as the draft process ramps into full speed.

The NBA deadline to declare for the 2019 NBA Draft is 11:59 p.m. on April 29th. Players must submit in writing to be a part of the draft. Once the early entry players are official, teams can start working those players out.

The NBA Draft lottery which will determine the top four selections of the 2019 NBA Draft will be held in Chicago on May 14th, just as the annual Draft Combine kicks off.

The NCAA has changed its rules and will allow players to not only test “the waters” but retain an agent, assuming that player does not accept anything more than transportation, reasonable lodging and meals related to meeting with that agent or conducting workouts for NBA teams.

The NCAA requires those players that wish to remain eligible to withdraw from the draft by May 29th.

The last date to withdraw from the draft by NBA is 5 p.m. on June 10th. This is usually not college level players; this date is typically international players that opt out of the draft.

The 2019 NBA Draft is set for June 20th.

Here is this week’s 60-pick Mock Draft:

Here are the first-round picks that are owed and how those picks landed where they are.

The Atlanta Hawks were to receive the Cleveland Cavaliers’ first-round pick as a result of the Kyle Korver trade in 2017, which is top-10 protected. But based on the final standings, that pick will not be conveyed.

The Boston Celtics were to receive the Memphis Grizzlies first-round pick as a result of the three-team Jeff Green trade in 2015; the pick is top-eight protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will not be conveyed.

The Atlanta Hawks are to receive the Dallas Mavericks first-round pick as a result of the Luka Dončić – Trae Young swap on draft night in 2018. The pick is top-five protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed.

The Boston Celtics are to receive the more favorable of either the Sacramento Kings or Philadelphia 76ers first-round picks as part of the Markelle Fultz pre-draft trade in 2017. Based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed; the Kings pick is the more favorable and would convey to Boston.

The Boston Celtics are to receive the LA Clippers first-round pick as a result of the Deyonta Davis draft day trade with Memphis in 2016. The Grizzlies got the pick in their Jeff Green/Lance Stephenson deal at the deadline in 2016. The pick is lottery protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed.

The Cleveland Cavaliers are to receive the Houston Rockets first-round pick as a result of the three-team deadline deal that sent out Brandon Knight and Marquese Chriss.

The Brooklyn Nets are to receive the Denver Nuggets first-round pick as a result of the Kenneth Faried – Darrell Arthur trade in July 2018. The pick is top-12 protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed.

The San Antonio Spurs are to receive the Toronto Raptors first-round pick as a result of the Kawhi Leonard – DeMar DeRozan trade in July 2018. The pick is top-20 protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed.

The Phoenix Suns are to receive the Milwaukee Bucks first-round pick as a result of the Eric Bledsoe trade in 2017. The pick has top 3 and 17-30 protections, designed to yield a lottery-level pick to Phoenix. Based on the final standings this pick would not convey. Given that the debt is not settled this year, the Bucks pick in 2020 would be top-7 protected.

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