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NBA Daily: Trade Watch – Southeast Division

Ben Nadeau continues Basketball Insiders’ “NBA Trade Watch” series by looking at the Southeast Division.

Ben Nadeau

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The NBA provides the masses great drama during nearly every month of the year — February, for many reasons, is no different. Aside from the All-Star Game-related festivities, the trade deadline is always a popular period of time for the frenzied onlooker. On the surface level, the notion of asking whether the buyers will buy and if sellers will sell seems inherently boring, but it often goes beyond that. Are teams looking to shed an albatross contract? Is a franchise moving on from a once-successful era and officially pulling the plug? What about the dark horse surprises moved to make semi-risky deals and enter the conference contender conversation?

With franchise operating under their own long- and short-term plans, the deadline is always a fascinating study, even if a number of blockbuster swaps don’t go down. But with that critical point of the campaign circled on Feb. 7, the rumors will only heat up from here on out. On Monday, Spencer Davies tackled the Central Division, then David Yapkowitz tackled the Northwest. More recently, Drew Maresca snagged the Atlantic and Shane Rhodes handled the Southwest. Today, then, is the Southeast — so let’s wait no longer!

Atlanta Hawks

The Hawks, of course, are sellers.

According to reports, they’d like to move on from veterans Kent Bazemore, who is owed roughly $19.3 million in 2019-20, and Dewayne Dedmon. The latter is averaging 10.2 points and 7.5 rebounds on an expiring deal worth $7.2 million, thus making him a strong candidate for a trade in the coming weeks.

Also available, potentially, is Taurean Prince, a price-controlled 24-year-old that’s tallied 14 points and 4.1 rebounds on 36 percent from three-point range so far this season. For franchises looking at point guard help, the clearly healthy Jeremy Lin — expiring to the tune of $13.8 million this summer — should eventually be on the move as well, a reliable on-court presence that can shoot from deep and operate fluidly in the pick-and-roll.

Since they began leaning harder on their collections of prospects — Trae Young, Kevin Huerter, Omari Spellman, DeAndre’ Bembry and John Collins — the Hawks have actually flourished. Since Dec. 18, Atlanta has won more games (nine) than they did in the sixty before that (six), so if the youth movement wasn’t in full effect before, it certainly is now. Outside of those two groups — expendable and expiring versus the assets — there’s still Vince Carter ($1.5 million), but his veteran leadership is well-regarded within the Hawks’ locker room, so he seems like a good bet to stick around.

Atlanta has risen to 12th place in the Eastern Conference — so they’ll need to just keep doing what they’re doing: Play the kids, trade veterans for future assets and collect their next batch of impressive rookies in June. So far, so good.

Charlotte Hornets

As of today, the Hornets reside in the top eight — good enough, barely, for a postseason berth. Whether or not the hot-and-cold Hornets stand a chance against Milwaukee, Boston or Toronto seems irrelevant they must demonstrate to impending free agent Kemba Walker that the franchise is still in a position to build a winner. Earlier this week, the Mavericks approached the Hornets about a potential deal for Walker but were shut down quickly, according to Shams Charania of The Athletic. In any case, it proves that Charlotte is in for the long haul with Walker, thus illuminating their trade deadline strategy immensely.

Recent reports noted that the Hornets would be willing to add Frank Kaminsky to any deals that included Nicolas Batum — $27.1 million player option in 2020-21 — but that’s unlikely to move the needle. Many other members of this roster have established roles (Marvin Williams, Jeremy Lamb), hold future potential (Miles Bridges, Malik Monk), own little value (Dwayne Bacon, Devonte’ Graham) or boast contracts likely too big to move (Cody Zeller, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Bismack Biyombo). So if the Hornets are sticking with Walker, they may ultimately end up on the quiet side this deadline.

Miami HEAT

In many ways, the HEAT exist on the same plane as the Hornets, except they’re missing a true bonafide star.

Miami was sure they could compete without putting together a grand offer for the since-traded Jimmy Butler and the results have been mixed. Surely, on the cusp of February, the HEAT would’ve liked to be above .500 but, again, the Eastern Conference gives them life. Goran Dragic is expected to return around the All-Star break, which would be a huge boon but Miami will need to strengthen themselves elsewhere as well. The HEAT could be sellers, but history — led by President Pat Riley — says that is the less likely of the two fates. The only issue in improving at this deadline, naturally, remains the large deals the franchise handed out in recent offseasons, almost all of which have player options tacked onto the end.

Hassan Whiteside will make $27 million next season, while Dragic ($19.2 million) and Tyler Johnson ($19.2) aren’t exactly cheap either. Justise Winslow remains an intriguing piece, but he’s also one of Miami’s few young assets alongside Bam Adebayo, both of whom will presumably stay put down south. If there’s any consolation, it comes in the form of Josh Richardson, a 25-year-old standout that has been able to shoulder a heavy scoring load every night. Given his blossoming presence, the HEAT may be beholden to hop into the trade season craze — but Miami’s options also appear to be limited.

After a strong career resurgence last year, Wayne Ellington has contributed at a lesser extent across the board, albeit at five minutes less, but he’s got a manageable expiring contract of about $6.3 million. Still, Ellington is hitting 2.2 three-pointers per game, so a contender could certainly scoop him off the guard-laden roster for a future pick.

Elsewhere, Kelly Olynyk (9.1 points, 4.2 rebounds) would be far more intriguing if not for his 2020-21 player option worth $13.6 million. Dion Waiters, now fully healed, is in a similar situation and remains a talented piece, but a promised $12.6 million in two season’s time might be a tough pill to swallow for interested partners. Unless the HEAT take a shot at trading the farm — something like Richardson, minimally protected draft picks and cap space — for Bradley Beal or any other available stars, they, too, might be restricted to small-sided deals this season.

For this reason, there’s not a ton of actual trade scuttle surrounding the Miami HEAT at this point in time.

Orlando Magic

Even at 20-29, the Magic are well within the postseason race, but their destiny this year is up for grabs, reportedly.

Orlando is still hoping to reach the postseason, again according to Charania, but are preparing for the deadline in case they — losers of 3 of their last 12 games — continue to plummet down the ladder. If the Magic become sellers prior to the Feb. 7 date, they could be one of the most sought-after rosters in the NBA. Nikola Vucevic, likely headed to his first-ever All-Star Game next month, is on an expiring contract worth $12.7 million, while Terrence Ross ($10.5) and Jonathon Simmons ($5.7, non-guaranteed in 2019-20) could provide some much-needed cap relief in exchange for a draft pick.

D.J. Augustin  — 11.8 points, 4.8 assists and 43.5 percent from three-pointer range over 47 starts — is a reasonably cheap gamble at just $7.2 million next season. Working with a baseline core of Aaron Gordon, Jonathan Issac and Mohamed Bamba is a solid start, plus there’s the fate of the ever-solid Evan Fournier ($17 million through 2020-21) depending on how hard the Magic want to retool moving forward. If Fournier does reach the trade block, there will be suitors, almost definitely.

As for actual chatter, the Magic inquired about the availability of Dennis Smith Jr., but with the point guard’s return to practice, that move may not be on the horizon any longer. Should the Magic continue their postseason push, they’ll search for a younger ballhandler like Terry Rozier — who has been pursued by Orlando, according to ESPN’s Zach Lowe last week. Furthermore, the Magic appear interested in Knicks’ rotation castaway Frank Ntilikina, per Stefan Bondy of NYDN — so the franchise could go either way before the deadline. Even if they’re competing, a lower-stakes deal for Ntilikina makes sense both for the present and future iterations in Orlando.

If an all-in push is more of Orlando’s style, a certain franchise-level point guard was just potentially made available. Mike Conley, 31, holds the ninth-richest contract in the entire league — at a staggering $34.5 million in 2020-21 — but he’s the type of elite centerpiece that can make a big-time difference. For now, any move for the perennially-great court general is just conjecture.

Between now and Feb. 7,  all five of Orlando’s games are against playoff teams– so keep an eye on this space moving forward.

Washington Wizards

To finish up, there’s the Wizards — and, oh, boy, Washington, indeed.

Following an auspicious 2-9 opening to the campaign, Dwight Howard underwent lumbar surgery, the locker room got petty again and the Wizards tumbled to the conference basement. The news of John Wall’s season-ending operation made matters worse, well, at least initially. Since Wall last played — Dec. 26 versus Detroit — Washington has gone 7-5. It’s not a full-season turnaround just yet, perhaps unexpected given the absence of their five-time All-Star, but it’s a necessary start.

Like Orlando, Charania reports that the Wizards are waiting to see how things shake out over the next week or so before committing one way or the other. Washington made it “adamantly clear” to The Athletic that Bradley Beal, the source of many trade machine fantasies, is staying put. To back that up, owner Ted Leonsis, in London for the Knicks’ contest earlier this month, told media: “We will never, ever tank.”

Instead, it’s Otto Porter Jr — max contract and all — that Washington would like to deal, with the Utah Jazz and Dallas Mavericks (Scotto) both interested. At 13 points and 5.7 rebounds per game, the 25-year-old may just need a change of scenery — but his stretch four services would come at a hefty long-term price of a player option worth $28.5 million in 2020-21.

Jeff Green ($1.5 million) and Markieff Morris ($8.6) are on expiring deals and could help teams in a need of a veteran presence; while Howard (player option at a measly $5.6 in 2019-20) could be useful addition once he finishes rehabbing, ideally, sometime in February or March.

In any case, there’s a lot of business to handle between now and the deadline, with the Southeast Division poised to become some of the most active contributors. Without a truly elite franchise, the seventh- and eighth-placed Hornets and HEAT, unlikely to tank, must figure out what potential moves both exist and improve the roster. Whereas the Magic and Wizards, slightly further down the hierarchy, have to decide on pulling the plug entirely. Since it’s the Eastern Conference, despite their struggles, the 20-29 Magic are still just 4.5 games out of the postseason, so a crucial week is ahead for nearly all these teams.

Ben Nadeau is a Seattle-based writer in his second year with Basketball Insiders. For five seasons, he covered the Brooklyn Nets for The Brooklyn Game.

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NBA

NBA Daily: Who Is Headed To The Lakers Next?

With the recent departure of both Magic Johnson and Luke Walton, Jordan Hicks takes a look at where the Lakers stand and who they may end up hiring.

Jordan Hicks

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It is hard to pinpoint exactly how the Los Angeles Lakers organization is feeling at the moment. They’ve now missed the playoffs six seasons in a row, their sole star player – although playing really well – is aging and their young core of high-draft picks still hasn’t found any form of consistency – not to mention a fair share of injury problems.

Flashback to the summer of 2018 and things were going great. Magic Johnson – then president of the organization – had just inked the best player in the NBA to a four-year deal. What followed next was certainly interesting.

Instead of pairing LeBron James with a second superstar-caliber player, the Lakers decided to ink the likes of JaVale McGee, Michael Beasley, Rajon Rondo and Lance Stephenson. A lineup of players so diverse and flashy that most couldn’t help but dub them the Meme Team. The nickname, although silly, was absolutely fitting.

By the end of the season, Rondo and McGee were the only players from that group who were making any sort of an impact. Stephenson found himself injured and Beasley found himself out of the NBA altogether.

To the surprise of no one, those players never really meshed well with the young core of Lonzo Ball, Kyla Kuzma, Josh Hart and Brandon Ingram. Their impact wasn’t much better when sharing the court with James.

By the end of it all, the Lakers found themselves 11 games out of the playoffs. LeBron missed 17 crucial games midseason. The Lakers could have very well gone 11-6 during that stretch, but blaming their omission from the playoffs on James’ slightly-more-than-minor injury just masks the real issues.

Yes, the members of the Meme Team were all on expiring deals, but to think the Lakers left all their problems behind is egregious.

Perhaps the worst thing that happened all season was the myriad of rumors during the trade deadline that involved their entire young core and Anthony Davis. Regardless of what you think, the fact of the matter is that the same agent that represents LeBron also represents Davis. The trade never went down, but there were many solidified rumors that the entire young core of the Lakers was offered for Davis.

This clearly had an impact on the roster, as the Lakers post-All-Star break looked like a completely different team. And LeBron returning to the roster didn’t really make a major impact at all.

The reason for all this build up is to really illustrate the issues both the new president of basketball operations, as well as the new head coach, will come into. Recently, Magic Johnson resigned from his position and a few days later Luke Walton was fired. Reports have also surfaced that current general manager Rob Pelinka is the man that now controls most, if not all, of what goes on within the organization.

On Tuesday morning, Colin Cowherd of Fox Sports reported that Los Angeles already has their replacement for team president. Other reports have suggested that Monty Williams and Tyronn Lue are their two preferred options at Head Coach.

With Lue, you basically have an idea of what you’re going to get. Lue and James found success in Cleveland, making the NBA Finals every year they were together, as well as winning one championship. Shortly after James’ departure, Lue was fired.

This isn’t to say Ty Lue is a bad coach. But what you get with Lue is a very LeBronp-focused team. Lue has no problem taking the backseat – in a sense of the word – to James. They seemed to work really well together, and the Lakers surely would be hoping to regenerate the same sort of success the duo found in Cleveland.

Monty Williams, on the other hand, brings with him a rich history in the league and much more experience than Lue. He has served as a head coach with the New Orleans Pelicans, president of the San Antonio Spurs, an assistant on the U.S. National Team and is currently the assistant to Brett Brown in Philadelphia.

It is hard to say who exactly the Lakers favor, but in the same report highlighted previously, Williams could be offered the head coaching job with the 76ers if they don’t make it to the Eastern Conference Finals. That scenario seems very realistic.

Hiring Lue may be the preferred choice of LeBron James. They have a history, LeBron is comfortable with his coaching style, and his LeBron’s career clock is certainly ticking away. He really doesn’t have a season to waste adapting to the coaching style of someone he isn’t familiar with.

Regardless of who the Lakers hire, even Greg Poppovich himself likely couldn’t take the current roster, as-is, to the NBA Finals. They will certainly need to acquire a second star in free agency or, at worst, a slew of high-level role players.

Whomever they decide to go with at head coach – or whoever chooses to accept the job offer – will have a lot on their plate.

But the one glaring positive in all of this? There isn’t – at least arguably – a franchise in the NBA with a deeper history of success than the Los Angeles Lakers. Regardless of the current state of the franchise, the position alone should be coveted by many potential coaching prospects and candidates around the league.

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NBA

NBA Daily: Garrett Temple Fitting In With Clippers

David Yapkowitz sits down with Los Angeles Clippers swingman Garrett Temple to discuss his niche with the team and the culture they’ve established under Doc Rivers.

David Yapkowitz

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It’s been a season of silencing the doubters for the Los Angeles Clippers. Back in October when the NBA season began, you’d be hard pressed to have found anyone that would’ve given them a chance at making the playoffs.

Flash forward to the present, and they not only have made the postseason, but they’re currently tied 1-1 in the first round with the defending champion Golden State Warriors – and with the next two games on their home-court.

Even as recently as the trade deadline, there were people and pundits who doubted them when they traded away Tobias Harris, who was having an All-Star caliber season. But the new guys who arrived in February have been a huge reason why the Clippers continued to win, especially Garrett Temple.

The nine-year veteran began this season in Memphis after having spent the last two years with the Sacramento Kings. When the Clippers dealt Avery Bradley at the deadline, Temple – along with JaMychal Green – was one of the two pieces the Grizzlies sent back.

Temple had been a bit of journeyman prior to his time with the Kings and the four years before with the Washington Wizards. From his rookie season in 2009-10 to 2012-13, he had stints with the Houston Rockets, San Antonio Spurs, Milwaukee Bucks and Charlotte Hornets. When he first arrived in LA, he could tell right away the locker room dynamic.

“It’s great, we have a team where everybody knows their roles, everybody wants to win,” Temple told Basketball Insiders. “Winning is most important here, there’s no egos. We have a team like this where guys are coming together to do whatever coach [Doc Rivers] says. When it’s all about winning, good things can happen.”

And good things did happen. Following the trade deadline, the Clippers went 17-7, including win streaks of five and six games, to finish the season. They were two wins short of winning 50 games.

Temple had a big hand in that, sort of taking over the role Bradley played as the defensive-minded guard, who can stretch the floor and knock down the three.

“Coming off the bench, I give them some defensive energy. I give energy on the offensive end too, in transition, pushing the ball, make my open shots when I’m open,” Temple told Basketball Insiders. “When I get the chance, I make sure I push the pace. But just bringing that energy on the defensive side.”

Defense has been Temple’s strong suit since he’s been in the NBA. At 6-foot-6, he’s got the size to defend both guard positions as well as some small forwards. In this playoff series, he’s got the daunting task of being matched up against Stephen Curry or Klay Thompson.

But defense is something he prides himself on. He isn’t going to back down no matter who is standing across from him. Even as the oldest player in the Clippers locker room, he remains one of their best defenders.

“No question, I’ve prided myself on that since I got in the NBA. It’s part of the reason why I’ve been able to stay in the league,” Temple told Basketball Insiders. “A lot of guys in this league come off the bench and try to score. I pride myself on being that guy on the bench unit that can defend any three positions on the court.”

Since coming over to the Clippers, Temple has been averaging 4.7 points in 19.7 minutes per game. Normally a reliable three-point threat, his shooting numbers have dipped a bit. He’s down to 29.6 percent from three.

None of the team played well enough to mention in Game 1. But in the Game 2 thrilling comeback, Temple gave solid contributions of seven points, knocking down both his free throws and knocking down one of his two attempts from three-point range.

“You don’t fix what’s not broken, you continue to do what you do, whatever’s your strength,” Temple told Basketball Insiders. “Obviously there’s different transitions and different lingo, but at the end of the day, it’s just basketball. I find myself getting comfortable with what our coaches like us to do on the defensive end and offensive end, and trying to fit in well.”

It remains to be seen what happens in this series against the Warriors, but one thing is for sure – the Clippers definitely have Golden State’s attention. To this group, though, the fact that they were able to pull off a historic comeback probably isn’t surprising to them. They’ve prided themselves all season on having this tough mentality.

Temple recognized it right away before the playoffs even began. When he was in Memphis, he experienced the ‘Grit and Grind’ culture of hard-nosed basketball that the team had embraced. He noticed a similar time vibe with the Clippers, a vibe he knew would make them scary come playoff time.

“Just the fact that everybody is hungry, everybody understands their role. There’s no question from anybody what they’re supposed to do when they get on the court. It’s tough when you have a team that just got together,” Temple told Basketball Insiders.

“I think the biggest thing is we know what everybody does. We have enough firepower offensively, we have enough defensive pieces, and we have a Hall-of-Fame coach. We have a good recipe to be somebody to be reckoned with.”

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Mock Drafts

NBA Daily: 60-Pick NBA Mock Draft – 4/16/19

The deadline to declare for the 2019 NBA draft is April 29th, however, most of the notable prospects have already declared and started the training and preparation process. Steve Kyler offers up his latest weekly 60-Pick Mock Draft.

Steve Kyler

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Let the chaos begin!

The 2019 NBA Draft class has taken on more of a defined shape with the bulk of the expected early entry players having already declared for the draft, with several already in pre-draft gyms training and preparing for the marathon pre-draft process that will play out over the next 65 days.

There are a few dates to keep in mind as the draft process ramps into full speed.

The NBA deadline to declare for the 2019 NBA Draft is 11:59 p.m. on April 29th. Players must submit in writing to be a part of the draft. Once the early entry players are official, teams can start working those players out.

The NBA Draft lottery which will determine the top four selections of the 2019 NBA Draft will be held in Chicago on May 14th, just as the annual Draft Combine kicks off.

The NCAA has changed its rules and will allow players to not only test “the waters” but retain an agent, assuming that player does not accept anything more than transportation, reasonable lodging and meals related to meeting with that agent or conducting workouts for NBA teams.

The NCAA requires those players that wish to remain eligible to withdraw from the draft by May 29th.

The last date to withdraw from the draft by NBA is 5 p.m. on June 10th. This is usually not college level players; this date is typically international players that opt out of the draft.

The 2019 NBA Draft is set for June 20th.

Here is this week’s 60-pick Mock Draft:

Here are the first-round picks that are owed and how those picks landed where they are.

The Atlanta Hawks were to receive the Cleveland Cavaliers’ first-round pick as a result of the Kyle Korver trade in 2017, which is top-10 protected. But based on the final standings, that pick will not be conveyed.

The Boston Celtics were to receive the Memphis Grizzlies first-round pick as a result of the three-team Jeff Green trade in 2015; the pick is top-eight protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will not be conveyed.

The Atlanta Hawks are to receive the Dallas Mavericks first-round pick as a result of the Luka Dončić – Trae Young swap on draft night in 2018. The pick is top-five protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed.

The Boston Celtics are to receive the more favorable of either the Sacramento Kings or Philadelphia 76ers first-round picks as part of the Markelle Fultz pre-draft trade in 2017. Based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed; the Kings pick is the more favorable and would convey to Boston.

The Boston Celtics are to receive the LA Clippers first-round pick as a result of the Deyonta Davis draft day trade with Memphis in 2016. The Grizzlies got the pick in their Jeff Green/Lance Stephenson deal at the deadline in 2016. The pick is lottery protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed.

The Cleveland Cavaliers are to receive the Houston Rockets first-round pick as a result of the three-team deadline deal that sent out Brandon Knight and Marquese Chriss.

The Brooklyn Nets are to receive the Denver Nuggets first-round pick as a result of the Kenneth Faried – Darrell Arthur trade in July 2018. The pick is top-12 protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed.

The San Antonio Spurs are to receive the Toronto Raptors first-round pick as a result of the Kawhi Leonard – DeMar DeRozan trade in July 2018. The pick is top-20 protected and, based on the final standings, that pick will be conveyed.

The Phoenix Suns are to receive the Milwaukee Bucks first-round pick as a result of the Eric Bledsoe trade in 2017. The pick has top 3 and 17-30 protections, designed to yield a lottery-level pick to Phoenix. Based on the final standings this pick would not convey. Given that the debt is not settled this year, the Bucks pick in 2020 would be top-7 protected.

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