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The NBA’s Best Out-of-Bounds Sets and Coaches

Ben Dowsett breaks downs some of the best out-of-bounds sets and coaches from around the NBA.

Ben Dowsett

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Evaluating the day-in, day-out job of an NBA coach from a media perch will always be a supremely incomplete exercise. There’s just a ton of stuff that goes on within the confines of a given coach’s responsibilities that we’ll never see or hear about, and often some of the details herein are the biggest differentiators between what makes a good coach and a bad one.

There are bits of visible minutiae that allow us to judge a partial picture, though. Some of these are related to things like player development, in-game rotations, offensive and defensive schemes, and other elements – though even in these areas, player execution and other confounding factors will still always be at play. Over the years, though, one area that’s become a fun way to examine one distinct skill in a given coach’s arsenal has been looking at his team’s success on plays where coaches can have some of the largest tangible impact: out-of-bounds sets, particularly following timeouts and even more particularly in high-leverage situations.

Again, while this covers only a very small sub-section of a coach’s responsibilities and is absolutely influenced by external factors outside their control, it can be a fun proxy for which coaches are consistently the most inventive. A few guys have teams who consistently show up on the top end of efficiency for these kinds of plays year after year – at some point it’s no longer coincidence. It’s a real skill for coaches to draw up stuff that can create big openings given the constraints: just five seconds to get the ball inbounds, and a set defense waiting for trickery.

With that in mind, let’s have a little fun today. Here are a few examples, from basic to complex, of coaches running creative and exploitative out-of-bounds sets to get their teams some easy points. To the NBA junkie, this is more art than basketball (one quick clarification: these are not necessarily the teams or coaches who have the most consistent success, though several herein would be on that list).

Simple Stuff

Dwane Casey, like most coaches, has generally simple actions built into his scheme for out-of-bounds sets. He’s typically not looking for quick-hitters, but rather to get the ball inbounds safely to a free man and then initiate what’s been an efficient halfcourt offense in his time at the helm.

When teams start to prepare only for this, though, you can toss in the occasional wrinkle that preys on their assumption and finds an effortless look. See if you can spot the simple misdirection they use to get Cory Joseph a wide open three here:

James Johnson inbounds the ball, then immediately moves to take a Joseph down screen that looks like a standard way of getting Johnson into the post with good position on a smaller defender:

Raps1

As he finishes his screen, though, Joseph leaps quickly up to the top of the key, and as he does, big man Lucas Nogueira activates what’s known as “screening for the screener” action, where he immediately sets a second pick for Joseph, whose man is already lagging way behind after trying to adjust for Joseph’s first screen. What results is gravy:

Raps2

To be perfectly fair, some of the success on this play is Denver mangling their coverage somewhat badly. Jameer Nelson, checking Joseph, is a full second late realizing what’s happening. But it’s an example of how you can catch a team off guard with a small wrinkle if you normally run very simple stuff. The Raps are second in the league for sideline out-of-bounds efficiency, per Synergy Sports, and first for all after-timeout plays, in large part because they strike a good balance between low-risk stuff and the occasional bit of creativity.

More Inbounder Fun

Utilizing the inbounder as a piece of the resulting set is a popular way of creating some confusion, and Mike Budenholzer in Atlanta has an extremely simple way of doing so that’s almost guaranteed to create a mismatch at worst and a layup at best. It utilizes Paul Millsap (as the inbounder in this case) and Kyle Korver, two of the headiest players in the league, both of whom know exactly how their individual gravity will make defenses lean.

Millsap inbounds to the top of the key, then runs into a very similar Korver down screen as the one we saw from Toronto above. This is especially dangerous with Korver as the screen-setter – teams are quite wary by now of him setting screens as a way to get open threes for himself, and they don’t want to get burned. As a result, with no further complication needed, Millsap simply takes the screen and gets a layup when two OKC defenders are more focused on Korver:

It won’t always work this well, of course, but this easy set is nearly guaranteed to create at least small problems for the defense. At worst, Millsap likely ends up with good post position on a smaller defender who’s switched off of Korver, and if any D is too focused on Paul, one of the best off-screen shooters in league history gets an open triple. If they execute well and set firm screens, this is nearly guaranteed to create difficult rotations even in the best-case scenarios for the defense.

Gravity Machines

Another great way to find pockets of open space on inbound sets is to exploit the gravity certain shooters possess while on the floor, something the Hawks were doing above by utilizing Korver as their screen-setter. This can be done even more directly, though, and a couple coaches with some of the highest-gravity options in the game know just how to use them.

First take Rick Carlisle in Dallas, who has long been one of the strongest tactical minds in the game. Rick knows Dirk Nowitzki is one of the more unique gravity players to ever lace up – Dirk is big enough to set heavy screens on smaller guys, but such a threat from anywhere on the floor that teams are terrified of giving him any separation to help elsewhere.

We’ve slowed this one down so anyone watching carefully should be able to catch it. Watch as Dirk preps to set a basic cross-screen for Devin Harris to loop around (Dirk even motions for Harris to sell the façade), but a very easy counter (one that’s almost certainly at Harris’ own discretion when he sees the opening) gets one of the easiest layups you’ll see in the halfcourt:

Look what Jerami Grant (39), Dirk’s man, is doing as Harris cuts past him for the layup – he’s staring at Dirk:

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In retrospect, Grant should have helped down on Harris to prevent the layup, which is a much more efficient shot in the long run than a Dirk jumper. But Carlisle and the Mavs are counting on defenses consistently overreacting to Dirk’s presence – his defenders have spent the better part of two decades hearing about how much trouble they’ll be in if they let this slow, lumbering seven-footer find an open jumper. Voila, you get a layup. Great stuff, Rick, and stuff he’ll have at his disposal in some form until the day Nowitzki hangs it up.

Another example of exploiting insane gravity from a single player comes from the Warriors, though in this case (like most of their stuff), it’s truly tough to discern how much is pre-planned involving Luke Walton or Steve Kerr and how much is just a group of remarkably heady players improvising awesomeness.

Steph Curry, of course, is the linchpin allowing space to open up everywhere else. Watch as he and Klay Thompson loop simultaneously, then proceed to enter into the “spin cycle” of confusion they’re better at than anyone else in the league, intentionally creating chaos within a group of players. Steph will often rocket out of these anarchical pockets with confused and defeated defenders too far behind, but on this occasion, he’s just a decoy for Klay:

Just…poetry. That’s all this is. Within a span of under half a second, Klay realizes that both his defender and Steph’s are going with Curry as he leaves the spin cycle and sprints back up outside the arc – so Thompson simply slips along the baseline and gets a wide open layup before anyone even knows what’s happening. The Dubs can do this kind of stuff from anywhere on the floor so long as Curry and Thompson (at least the former, at minimum) are in the game, and it’s no coincidence they’ve surrounded these guys with smart, unselfish ball-movers who can find them when they inevitably open up cracks.

The Usual Suspects

Opinions will differ regarding which coaches are truly the best with their out-of-bounds and after-timeout sets, but a few names will appear frequently on these lists. Budenholzer and Carlisle were both listed above, but three others are perhaps the most common you’ll hear, not only for this niche area but for coaching overall: Brad Stevens, Gregg Popovich and Frank Vogel.

Brad Stevens in Boston has quickly developed a reputation as maybe the best in-game coach in the league, even surpassing guys like Pop and Carlisle in many eyes. He’s a legitimate savant for recognizing a trend or matchup that can yield his team an easy bucket, and while the execution can’t always be perfect, there’s an easy argument that he puts his group in a better position time in and time out than any other bench boss in the league. Watch the following Celtics set and see if you had even the slightest inkling of what was coming before it happened:

Not much analysis is really even necessary here. Stevens is the league’s foremost master at playing on what an opponent thinks is coming before pulling the wool over their eyes in an instant, and sets like these aren’t even uncommon at this point. Many keen observers would pick him over anyone else in the world if their life depended on an end-of-game OOB set working for two points.

Just a few years Stevens’ senior within the NBA ranks, Pacers coach Frank Vogel also has an excellent all-around reputation. The way he’s re-worked his team’s style on the fly this summer after wide roster turnover has been special, and the way he’s leveraged the shooting available to him on his roster has trickled down to some of his out-of-bounds actions. This one looks pretty standard at first glance, but see if you can catch what makes it work so well:

If you missed it, get ready for a slo-mo replay after we break it down, and keep a keen eye on the middle of the floor. Chase Budinger begins the set by streaking from the foul line past a Jordan Hill screen into the strong side corner, but this is a decoy action. C.J. Miles simultaneously moves over to set what appears to be a cross-screen for Monta Ellis to free Monta for a catch, but this is where it gets fun. Watch how Miles and Ellis do the same “spin cycle” reversal as the Warriors above, giving Hill his own extra beat to make his way in their direction before both Hill and Ellis end up screening for Miles as he backs out into an open triple:

Again, this is nothing complex – one decoy action to get eyes moving the wrong way, one extra reversal in the main action, and a lethal volume shooter gets an open three.

Finally, among the NBA’s OGs for creative play-calling is Spurs boss Gregg Popovich. To be totally honest, the 2015-16 iteration of the Spurs has involved less overall creativity on these sets than we might normally be accustomed to from Pop – he’s seemed more focused on entering the ball safely in general, allowing the Spurs to play the grind-it-out halfcourt style they’ve transitioned to on the year.

That doesn’t mean there’s no room for some ingenuity even on these sets, though. On this occasion watch Patty Mills, who starts the play on the strong side baseline – Mills makes as if to accept a pindown screen to the top of the key, but then acts almost as if he’s aborting his cut as the ball is instead inbounded to Manu Ginobili, slowing down as if to reset himself in the corner. But before the Bulls are ready, watch what Mills does next:

Yummy! One would prefer, of course, that Mills ended up behind the three-point line instead of shooting a long two, and the two cross-screens he gets from Spurs bigs could certainly have been better. But the quick action is designed as a way to catch a defense leaning the wrong way and initiate damning rotations, which the Spurs are the class of the league at exploiting. No one will ever out-Pop Pop.

Ben Dowsett is a Deputy Editor and in-depth basketball analyst based in Salt Lake City. He covers the Jazz on a credentialed basis for Basketball Insiders, and has previously appeared in the Sports Illustrated and TrueHoop Networks. He can be found on Twitter at @Ben_Dowsett.

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Brungardt, BAM Changing The Game In Accurate Athletic Assessment

Spencer Davies speaks with strength and conditioning specialist Brett Brungardt about co-founding Basic Athletic Measurement and its role in the NBA Draft Combine.

Spencer Davies

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As the NBA’s postseason continues and the crowning of a champion in the Finals draws nearer, the rest of the league’s attention is set on June 20, the date of the 2019 NBA Draft.

Last Tuesday in Chicago, the results of the draft lottery determined the first-round order of the top selections in the field. Over the next three days, attention shifted to the annual NBA Draft Combine.

You didn’t see Zion Williamson’s or RJ Barrett risk injury or hurt their chances by participating. Ja Morant, Jarrett Culver, Coby White and Cam Reddish all spoke to the media and met with teams, but they didn’t actually do anything physical. You rarely see any of those premier prospects do so.

The purpose of the NBA Combine is to help boost the draft stock of professional hopefuls that aren’t pegged at the top of their class. It’s the place where some late first-rounders turn into mid-first-rounders. Where once-thought-of undrafted players move up into potential draftee status through athletic testing and live scrimmages in front of executives, agents and coaches.

Every year, there’s always a “winner” at the NBA Combine, and sometimes there are multiple that benefit come draft time. We’ll find that out in about a month.

Whoever that may be, though, will have to thank Brett Brungardt.

Boasting over 25 years of experience—notably as a former strength and conditioning coach at the University of Washington and with the Dallas Mavericks—Brungardt is responsible for the co-founding of Basic Athletic Measurement (BAM), a standardized athletic testing organization that has essentially been the straw that stirs the drink at the NBA Combine since the company’s inception in 2008.

Brungardt hatched the idea of BAM based on conversations with head coaches over his time as a strength and conditioning assistant. He’d field questions about 40-yard sprint times and vertical jump measurements, and then would refer to spreadsheets with recorded year-by-year results to answer them.

Unfortunately, almost all the time, Brungardt’s numbers didn’t match up with the staff’s findings—so he brainstormed.

“In the back of my mind I kept thinking there’s gotta be a way to have reliable and valid information in a linear component that’s looking at athletes through time that we can trust,” Brungardt told Basketball Insiders at Quest Multisport in Chicago. “We were the original fake news, to be quite honest.

“On the back of that, we decided to come up with a standardized way of assessing athletes and looking at what we call our performance parameters, and then put that in the equation of making sure we’re creating a well-balanced, healthy athlete through some…they really are quite simple tests, but what we’ve added to make it more reliable is the technology. So we’re looking at a lot of data points. Not necessarily the end results become important, but it’s all the significant data points between the start and finish.”

Brungardt put in the work to travel across the world, scouring through New Zealand and Australia to find the perfect technology that would best help drive his brainchild. Doing his due diligence, he agreed to partner with Fusion Sport, a global leader in human performance software.

And so, along with Martin Haase, his co-founder who had an extensive background in software and statistics to help on the organizing end of things, Brungardt launched BAM.

For the past 11 years, BAM has taken a combination of advanced technological equipment and data collection to record times and scores—labeled BAMScores—for standardized tests specific to certain drills.

“It’s like an SAT for younger people,” Brungardt said.

At the NBA Combine, BAM administers five different tests, all of which are incorporated into BAMScore:

Pro Three-Quarter Court Sprint: Determines acceleration, maximum speed and speed endurance.

Lane Agility: Tests movement patterns in all four directions around the lane and measures the ability to make quick changes of direction while moving at speed.

Reaction Shuttle: Evaluates ability to show how quick and effective decisions are made and actions initiated. The brief interval of time it takes to react to an external stimulus.

Vertical Jump: Demonstrates ability to exert a maximal force in as short a time as possible vertical displacement.

Approach Jump: Athlete starts within 15 feet of the Vertec. It is a running start vertical jump. Measurement is similar to vertical jump, but also includes the athlete’s ability to coordinate and incorporate strength and power with reach.

The process of executing such tests is quite fascinating. According to an interview Brungardt did with Access Athletes, the participants register online ahead of the events and are given an identification tag with their Fusion ID technology. They are then re-registered with their tags verified through video. During the actual tests, an electronic wristband is worn to monitor player movement.

And just in case of the rarity where the software doesn’t reflect the correct outcome, Brungardt utilizes three backups (a video, handheld PDA and a CPU backing up the system).

Once an athlete finishes a test –or is done with the full amount of testing—the timing system downloads the results into BAM’s database where all of the information is stored. From there, the times and BAMScore reports can be shared to whoever requests them.

“For basketball, it’s the biggest standardized database in the world because we’ve been doing it for such a long time and standardized this process with the technology,” Brungardt said. “There are databases out there with hand time, which is highly unreliable, and mixtures of such, but all of ours are an apple-to-apple comparison.”

Physically and athletically speaking, these tests tell us everything we need to know. As for measuring greatness at the professional level, that’s the tough part.

“To use this as a talent identification process, [no]. There’s a lot of things that go on in basketball,” Brungardt said. “Larry Bird probably would not have been a great combine tester. But if you’re looking at a specific role for a player, someone that’s gonna fill a spot, that’s gonna play a role because there’s only one basketball out there, then you may have certain metrics that you deem are meaningful.

“We acquire the data. The brains in the NBA then put their secret sauce together from this data to see what they want to utilize out of that component. There’s great athletes and they’re fun to watch. It’s fun to watch the movement patterns, see how they do. Because it’s becoming more ingrained in the culture of basketball, but it’s still not like other sports where these parameters are instilled in junior high age and kids are performing them. So some of this is new to these athletes.”

Testing well is just one piece of the puzzle. Although it’s not his area of expertise, Brungardt has a general idea of how prospective talent is evaluated by basketball scouts and front office executives.

“There’s a performance box. And if they’re outside that box, probably no matter what their skill set is, it may be very difficult for them to perform at this level because the guys are so athletic,” Brungardt said. “You could be the greatest shooter in the world, but if you can’t create the space or get your shot off fast enough, then they’re gonna get to you and they’re gonna change your world.

“So you have to be athletic enough to create space to move so then you also then can’t be a certain liability. So there’s an athletic box they look at, and then they start to move down to skill pattern. That’s still the priority.”

BAM isn’t just limited to basketball, by the way. The organization does testing in 17 sports in total, with BAMScores compiled for each so that the numbers can be compared across.

For example, Jordan Bone earned the highest BAMScore at the 2019 NBA Combine in Chicago with a total of 2401 points. Put that next to Troy Apke’s impressive showing at the 2018 NFL Combine (unofficial BAMScore of 2379—they can’t authenticate the measures) and you can infer that both are extremely athletic people.

Bone and Apke’s BAMScores fall into the “professional” range of the organization’s scale. Contrasting with the U.S. Men’s National Cricket Team tryouts in April 2018, their player’s top BAMScore was 1957, a figure that ranks in the “varsity” category, three levels below the range those two fell into.

“Some sports have certain parameters that they’re better at because of adaptations and skills that go on in that sport than others,” Brungardt said. “But it doesn’t mean that other sports can’t look at those and become better at those performance parameters.”

Brungardt’s past experiences in basketball coaching played a significant part in making his vision come to life. With Brett’s innovation and the assistance of Haase, BAM has become the standard bearer of accurate athletic assessment.

“We established: ‘These tests are helpful for this sport,'” Brungardt said “Stopwatches just are not the most reliable way in the world to do it. When you start looking at more transcription and every time you touch data humanly, things happen that make it inaccurate.

“For me, it’s about physical development. I wanted to test an athlete, then I trained them and then I wanted to re-test them in a reliable fashion to see if what I was doing in the weight room was improving him on those components. And those were the goals.”

And while Brungardt is proud of the presence BAM has, he understands that upgrading should always be on their mind.

“Anytime you have more data on a test, it becomes more valid. It’s testing when it purports to test and that’s what validity is,” Brungardt said. “The technology is better. It always gets better.

“It’s about right now, we feel it’s really good. We’re always looking to improve things, but there’s always the human component because you have proctors. There’s lots of things we try to make as consistent as possible, but here what we’re doing, everything that we touch, pretty good!”

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NBA Daily: Tacko Fall Out To Prove He’s More Than Tall

Most of the attention centered around Tacko Fall stems from his height, but after an impressive combine outing, he’s out to prove that there’s so much more to him.

Matt John

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Tacko Fall was one of the many participants who attended the NBA Draft Combine this past week in Chicago.

By so doing, the combine retrieved all of his official measurements as a player such as his height, weight, and wingspan among others. After the combine was over, Fall had the following measurements.

Height (without shoes): 7’5 ¼’’
Height (with shoes): 7’7″
Weight: 289 pounds
Wingspan: 8’2 ¼’’
Standing Reach: 10’2 ½”
Vertical Leap: 26.5″

Those measurements set many records at the combine. So, in case you didn’t know it before, growing has never exactly been an issue for Tacko Fall. Even though the findings that measured how freakishly tall Fall is shocked the masses, none of them really fazed the man himself as long as that meant he wasn’t going to grow anymore.

“I kind of already knew so I wasn’t really surprised,” Fall said. “I don’t think I’m going to keep growing. I think it’s just going to stay there. Hopefully. We’ll see.”

Fall’s physical advantages made him look like a man among boys in his four years at the University of Central Florida. The Senegal native averaged 2.4 blocks and 7.7 rebounds – in only 23 minutes per game – and put up a scorching field goal percentage of 74 percent over the four-year span of his college career. Basically, Fall’s good stats mainly come from his unrivaled length.

During his time at the combine, Fall believes that sticking to his guns and not doing things out of his comfort zone made him look good to spectators.

“I think I’m doing pretty good,” Fall said. “I’m holding my own. I’m not going out there doing anything out of character. I’m staying true to myself. I’m playing hard. I’m talking. I’m running hard. I’m doing everything that I need to do.”

Despite his towering presence, Fall is not expected to be a high selection in this year’s NBA Draft, if he is selected at all. Not many mock drafts at the time being list his name among those who will be taken, and the ones that do have him among one the last selections in the draft.

Some of his primary critiques as a player include his low assist-to-turnover ratio and his faulty shooting mechanics. The biggest one of them all is his lack of mobility. Being as tall as he is would make it hard for anyone to move around well enough to compete with NBA offenses that rely more on quickness and spacing now than it did on mass.

The concerns surrounding Tacko’s mobility were made loud and clear to him. That’s why he believed he had something to prove to the skeptics at the combine.

“For people my size that’s the biggest thing that they’re looking for,” Fall said. “‘Can he move?’ ‘Can he keep up with the game?’ ‘Can he run the floor?’ ‘Can he step out and guard?’ I feel like I have the ability to do those things. So, coming in here and having the opportunity to play against great competition and showing my abilities have been a great blessing for me.”

Before the combine, Fall’s stock benefited from his final performance as a college basketball player. Tacko and the ninth-seeded Knights fought the first-seeded Blue Devils until the very end but ultimately lost 77-76. Fall had much to do with UCF’s near-upset over Duke, putting up 15 points, six rebounds and three blocks in 25 minutes before fouling out.

That game did a lot for Tacko’s belief in himself as a player leading to the combine. Putting up that kind of stat line against one of the best college basketball programs with three top-10 prospects with so much on the line had to make him feel good about his chances. He said as much following his performance at the combine.

“That was definitely one of the best games in my college basketball career,” Fall said. “It helps build confidence. You go toe-to-toe with those people. You think, ‘Wow I can really do this.’ All you have to do is keep working and working and keep proving that you can step out there and compete every night.”

For some prospects, the NBA Combine is nothing more than just a formality. In fact, multiple prospects for this upcoming draft – including RJ Barrett, Rui Hachimura, and consensus No. 1 pick Zion Williamson – decided to skip out on it. For prospects who are on the bubble like Tacko, it’s a rare opportunity to show that there’s more to them than what they showed in college.

Fall recognized the importance of the occasion and voiced his appreciation for the chance he had to show everyone who attended what he can bring to a basketball court.

“It’s been a great experience,” Fall said. “I’m blessed to be here. I worked really hard. I thank God I’m in this position. I just got to take advantage of it.”

Tacko’s efforts impressed scouts and media members alike. There have been rumblings that his play at the combine has further increased his stock in the NBA Draft. Even with all the work he’s put in and the ambition he has to make it to the biggest stage, Fall is soaking it all in.

“I’m enjoying it because not a lot of people get the opportunity to come here,” Fall said. “I’ve worked really hard and God put me in this position. I’m just trying to enjoy it.”

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NBA Daily: Bruno Fernando Is Ready To Take On The NBA

After his sophomore season at Maryland, Bruno Fernando is confident that he is ready to take on the NBA, writes James Blancarte.

James Blancarte

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The 2019 NBA Draft Lottery kicked off the draft season in a shocking way as numerous teams jumped into the top four due to the new draft structure. After the Lottery, it’s a bit easier to predict the order in which Zion Williamson, Ja Morant and R.J. Barrett will be selected. Who gets drafted after that, and in what order, is still very much unclear. There are some consensus players in the upper half of the first round. After that, things get very interesting.

Expect the mock draft boards to be all over the place as we move closer to this year’s draft, especially after going through the Combine. Many once less-heralded players show up to the Combine with eye-opening physical measurements, impress in workouts and scrimmages and demonstrate a level of professional polish, among other things.

Last year, after his Freshman season as Maryland, center Bruno Fernando participated in the draft process. Fernando did not sign with an agent and ultimately returned to Maryland where he continued to raise his profile. This year, Fernando again participated in the Combine and spoke with Basketball Insiders.

“I think what’s different this time around is just how much easier it’s gotten. For me, how much more comfortable I am. How much easier it is. Obviously, you know what to expect,” Fernando told Basketball Insiders. “I think just really being here and being around the guys on the team has been a completely different experience than I had last year. This year I know a lot more of the guys. I’ve been working out with a lot of different guys. I think it’s just been a much, much better experience.”

Starting all but one game his sophomore year, Fernando averaged 13.6 points, 10.6 rebounds, 1.9 blocks and two assists per game. These averages were a significant jump over his freshman year. Fernando uses an aggressive, mobile game at and around the basket to do his damage. After solidifying his game on the court, he felt comfortable enough signing with an agent and letting Maryland know he wouldn’t be returning for his junior year. Fernando is now confident about his positioning in the draft, which played a factor in his decision to not play in five-on-five scrimmages.

“Last year I was in a position where I didn’t really know where I stand as much. Last year I had to find out a lot of things coming into the combine,” Fernando said. “And this year I think I am in a position just by talking to my agent and my coaches where I feel like I’m in a position where I’m a lot comfortable compared to last year, in a much better place. Having that that feedback from teams really, my agent really felt like that was the best decision for me not to play five-on-five.”

Fernando’s offensive prowess and athletic upside have him looking like a solid first-round pick. According to the Basketball Insiders version 3.0 mock draft, Fernando is projected to go anywhere from 14th- 29th overall. Tommy Beer projects him to go 25th. Being drafted in the first-round, in general, portends a better career as teams find themselves with a greater financial stake in the player and accordingly will be pinning higher hopes for that prospect.

At 6-foot-10, Fernando projects as a low post threat with excellent handwork who can score with a variety of moves down low as well as a lob threat. Fernando also occasionally takes advantage of steal and breakaway opportunities to run the floor and score easy points with his ferocious dunking ability. He didn’t do much damage from distance, although his shooting stroke and mechanics make that part of his game a potential future weapon in his arsenal. Fernando addressed that very point.

“The part of my game that is unseen so far is my ability to space the floor. My ability to dribble the ball and put the ball on the floor, take guys off the dribble and my shooting ability,” Fernando told Basketball Insiders. “I really think my shooting ability is something that people don’t notice that I am able to shoot the ball. Just because of my situation in Maryland where I didn’t really take many shots. You know, I never really had to come outside and try to play outside. You know we had a lot of really good players on the perimeter. I think it’s really just a matter of me staying to true to myself, who I am and trying to win in the best way possible.”

Any team in need of a possible pick-and-roll threat who can score down low should keep an eye on Fernando. Whether a team believes that Fernando can also be successful as a stretch big is not as clear. Where Fernando ends up is still totally up in the air. Regardless, he’s grateful for the opportunity to be the first representative from his own home country of Angola to play in the NBA and made it clear that he has been hearing from other Angola natives.

“Sending a lot of love and positive energy, lot of words of encouragement for me and I think it is really special to get those text messages,” Fernando told Basketball Insiders. “Having people from home texting me every single day. Just knowing that a whole nation is behind me. I’m here fighting and sacrificing to make a dream come true, something that will not just benefit me but a whole nation.”

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