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NBA AM: Some Fun With The G-League

As the season begins, there are a few early stand-outs in the G-League, especially the ones on regular contracts.

Steve Kyler



Fun In The G-League

While the gap between the NBA and its minor league system The Gatorade League (G-League) is still pretty significant, there are some players logging early games that make them worth watching, especially as teams get into trade mode in December.

Keep in mind that NBA teams were able to sign two roster players to Two-Way Contracts this season, and those contracts are tradable assets for teams just like normal NBA contracts.

G-League players that are not on Two-Way contracts are basically NBA free agents, so there are a few of those to watch too.

Quinn Cook – Santa Cruz Warriors – Two Way Deal

The Golden State Warriors activated Quinn Cook last night against the Orlando Magic, he didn’t log any meaningful minutes or stats, but his five G-League games continue to illustrate why he should be on an NBA roster. Cook has bounced around the outside of the NBA for the last couple of seasons as he’s tried to find a home.

Its unlikely the Warriors are going to keep him long term which makes him an interesting player to watch. In five G-League games, Cook has averaged 26 points, 5.8 rebounds, and 7.04 assists. In those same contests, he shot the ball well from the field, an area he has struggled with at the NBA level. While five games are five games, he is a player worth watching, especially in a point guard driven league.

Melo Trimble – Iowa Wolves

Unlike Cook, Iowa guard Melo Trimble is on a standard G-League contract making him an eligible free agent. It’s unlikely anyone pounces on Melo early, but if he continues to play at the level he’s played in his first four games, he could be a call-up candidate. Trimble was a standout player at Maryland but never got enough traction to be a draft pick. In four games with the Wolves, he is averaging 23.5 points, 2.8 rebounds, and 6.3 assists. Trimble’s efficiency numbers are not great, so time will tell if this is just early success or if there is something worth looking at on the NBA level. Trimble’s appeal is that he is obtainable right away, especially if he continues to play well.

Trey Burke – Westchester Knicks

Like Trimble, Burke is a standard G-League player, making him eligible to be called up by any NBA team that wants to sign him. Burke has played well for the Knicks’ G-League team and is another interesting name to watch. In five games for Westchester, he is averaging 22.8 points, four rebounds, and 6.2 assists. Unlike Trimble, Burke has NBA experience, making him more likely to get a look especially if he continues to play well. It is more likely than not that Burke gets a call-up at some point, which is likely why he opted for the G-League and a chance to really play.

Dwight Buycks – Grand Rapids Drive – Two-Way Deal

Buycks is one of those players just on the bubble of being an NBA player. He’s logged NBA minutes with Toronto during the 2013-14 season and the LA Lakers during the 2014-15 season. He has played Summer League for Oklahoma City, San Antonio, Toronto, The Lakers and the Mavericks. To put it bluntly, Buycks has been around the block a few times, so he should be posting big numbers in the G-League. In five games with Grand Rapids, he is averaging 22.8 points, 5.2 rebounds, and four assists. The problem for Buycks is his efficiency is low, and his shooting percentages are on the low end too. The Pistons control his rights, and they guaranteed him $50,000 this season. Buycks is a known quantity, which makes him worth watching, especially if his shooting percentages come up.

Emeka Okafor – Delaware 87ers

Yes, that’s the same Emeka Okafor that was the second overall pick in 2004. Okafor is trying to make an NBA comeback and opted to sign in the G-League to prove that he still has something to contribute and that his back and neck issues are completely healed. Okafor was diagnosed with a herniated disc in his neck back in 2013 and has spent the last four years recovering from surgery and rehab on the injury. Okafor was in camp with the 76ers and opted to stay in the organization at the G-League level. He is on a standard G-League contract, so he is an eligible free agent. In four games with the 87ers (or the Sevens as they are abbreviated down to), Okafor is averaging 14.3 points and 11.3 rebounds. In all four games, he has been above 60 percent from the field. The big question on Okafor is durability, so he is a name to watch especially as teams get closer and closer to signing ten-day contracts or making trades to open up roster spots.

Kendrick Perkins – Canton Charge

Like Okafor, Perkins was in camp with the Cavaliers and was their last roster cut. Perkins opted to play in the G-League and stay in the Cavaliers organization, and there is a belief they may bring him up if they open a roster spot. Perkins is on a standard G-League contract, so he is an eligible free agent. In three games with the Charge, Perkins have averaged 13 points, 10.3 rebounds, and 1.7 assists. Perkins locker room presence, history as a leader and enforcer make him attractive. While most think of Perkins as an older player, he is just 33 years old and has dropped a considerable amount of weight. Like Okafor, teams are likely going to want to see a larger sample size, but Perkins is a name to watch especially if the injury bug strikes.

There are a few other names to know in the G-League with real NBA value this season, many of which are on Two-Way deals like Chicago’s Antonio Blakeney, Memphis’ Kobi Simmons, Sioux Falls’ Derrick Walton Jr. and Orlando’s Jamel Artis.

NBA teams with roster room can always “Call Up” a normal G-League roster player, even on non-guaranteed deals. Teams start to seriously consider “Call-Ups” in January when they can issue ten-day contracts. This season NBA teams can begin to issue Ten-Day deals on January 5th.

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Steve Kyler is the Editor and Publisher of Basketball Insiders and has covered the NBA and basketball for the last 17 seasons.


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Joel Bolomboy is Dreaming of Another Shot in the NBA

Joel Bolomboy was raised on dreaming, and he’s worked those dreams into an NBA reality.

Dennis Chambers



Joel Bolomboy was raised on dreaming.

When he was four years old, his parents picked up and moved halfway across the world from Ukraine to the United States. At the time, he was an only child. His parents wanted to start a life full of opportunities for their growing family, which would soon accompany Bolomboy with three younger sisters. The best way to do so was to chase the American Dream.

Throughout his life, both personal and on the basketball court, Bolomboy continues to carry that dreamer’s mentality to further himself with the opportunities his parents provided him nearly 20 years ago. To understand the success he’s been able to find on his journey, you first need to understand the route he chose to get there.

For Bolomboy, his path to professional basketball didn’t start with a plastic Fisher-Price hoop and a cliche story of him making his first basket before he could even walk. Playing basketball wasn’t even the first sport he gave his full attention to when growing up.

After moving from Ukraine to Texas, Bolomboy spent his time in adolescence doing a lot of the same stuff every kid in America does. He watched TV a lot, he got acquainted with a skateboard, he tried every sport under the sun. Tennis, track, football, anything to keep him occupied as he became integrated into the American culture. As the 6-foot-10 sweet-shooting big man says himself, “I can play any sport you can think about.”

When the Texas heat became a bit too unbearable for the outdoor sports, though, Bolomboy shifted his focus to basketball. Towering over most middle schoolers at the time, standing at 6-foot-2 in eighth grade, Bolomboy was nudged in the direction of the hardwood by his best friend’s father, Gerald Sledge.

Sledge was the coach at Central High School in Keller, Texas. With his free time, he would come down to Bolomboy’s middle school to try to find players for his team, while simultaneously offering advice and workouts to the students. That’s where it all began for Bolomboy.

“(Sledge) would come in a few times a week,” Bolomboy said. “And like, nobody would go over there except for his son, and his name was Lawrence. So, I was like, maybe I should go over there. You know, I was playing football and I wasn’t really into it just because there were so many guys. It was an outdoor sport and growing up in Texas, it was really hot, always hot. I just felt like it wasn’t for me. So, I just kept going to basketball working on my game. And I just got better and better at and just kind of went from there.”

Go from there, he did. Bolomboy used his size advantage coupled with the natural athleticism he displayed growing up to play his way onto the radar of college basketball coaches around the country. His future in the sport looked bright. Colleges like Florida State and Clemson expressed their interest in signing Bolomboy, but those offers from high-major programs didn’t connect with the high schooler at the time.

Instead, it was mid-major Weber State and Phil Beckner who won the services of Bolomboy, not knowing at the time they were signing a player who would go on to be one of the most decorated in program history.

“Those schools like Florida State,” Bolomboy said. “I remember them telling me that if I go there, they wanted me to be a redshirt my first year. It just didn’t seem right. You know, kind of bigger schools, they felt like they were just kind of hearing about me and came into the picture and they really know, who I was, about my game.

“I think the main reason why I picked Weber State just because the coaching staff they had in place and all the guys that were there, I kind of like them a lot,” Bolomboy said. “And just like, the main reason is because they believed in me and they had a plan for me. They also showed me a long-term plan because they had a guy named Phil Beckner and he’s the one who recruited me and he was really good at developing players. But, Dame, he always says like Coach Phil, the coach who recruited me, he’s the biggest reason why he’s in the NBA. So, I took that into consideration.”

Getting to the NBA is no easy task for any player. Every year thousands of college basketball players line up for a chance to be drafted in one of the 60 slots, and the rest scramble to fill in summer league invites and training camp opportunities. When a player has the pedigree of a Kentucky or Duke, sometimes life is a bit easier in landing that chance.

Coming from Weber State? Well, the work was cut out for Bolomboy.

All he did during his time in college was dominate, though. In 2016, Bolomboy was named Big Sky Player of the Year. He left Weber State as the program’s all-time leading rebounder, too.

The mid-major to NBA road is one less traveled, for sure, but Bolomboy was never worried about that standing in the way of his chances.

“I knew that getting into the NBA would all come eventually,” Bolomboy said. “The main thing for me was to continue to get better and just being stronger. And if you could play, you’re an NBA caliber player, those guys, that’s what they get paid for. Those scouts, they find you out there.”

When Bolomboy made his way to the NBA Draft Combine ahead of the 2016 draft, he found himself around all of those same players from the high-major schools that passed him over. It was his opportunity to prove to himself something he knew all along: that he belonged in the same gym with all of those guys.

“What really put me over the top was when I did all of my athletic testing,” Bolomboy said. “And I felt like I was much better and more explosive than those guys. When we started playing, I was playing good and I was playing better than a lot of those guys. I was finishing at the rim, hitting my three’s, rebounding and doing what I normally do.”

The impressive combine performance led to another dream few ever realize: being drafted into the NBA. In the second round, with the Utah Jazz picking 52nd overall, Bolomboy saw his name pop up on the screen while surrounded by friends and family.

“It was such a good night just to hear my name called,” Bolomboy said. “I teared up and stuff like that just knowing all of my hard work and everything I did, just to hear my name called, it all paid off. It was just the start of everything.”

Once life in the NBA begins, nothing is guaranteed. Unless you’re a first-round pick, the money usually isn’t, either. Getting to the league is a battle in its own right, but the real fight begins once you’re there. For Bolomboy, his journey since seeing his name flash across that screen has been a prime example of that grind.

After spending his rookie season with the Jazz among the likes of Rudy Gobert, Derrick Favors, and Trey Lyles, opportunities for court time came few and far between. It was in that first season that Bolomboy experienced the back and forth of being on both an NBA squad and a G-League squad; he appeared in 24 games for the Salt Lake City Stars. Spending time down in the G-League helped keep Bolomboy sharp throughout the season.

This season for Bolomboy has been spent primarily in the G-League, with the Wisconsin Herd. Taking the learning experience he gained last year while around the Jazz, the forward has turned in one of the most impressive seasons the developmental league has seen. Averaging 17 points, 10.5 rebounds, and shooting 59 percent from the floor, Bolomboy has once again found himself squarely on the radar of NBA clubs.

With the way the game of basketball is evolving, more big men are asked to step out to the three-point line. After attempting just one three-pointer in his first two years of college, Bolomboy has developed into a legitimate shot-maker from beyond the arc. Last season in the G-League, he made 21 of his 46 attempts.

“Coaches always told me if I’m open to shoot it and don’t even hesitate,” Bolomboy said of his G-League experience last season. “It will make defenses respect you more because for me when I am on the perimeter and for a guy to sag off me two to three feet, that’s disrespectful.”

From Ukraine to America, Bolomboy has developed more than a jump shot. He’s developed the opportunity to succeed, not just on the basketball court, but in life as well. His parents dreamed of a better life when they moved to the United States, and Bolomboy grew up dreaming of a shot at the NBA. Both things have come true, for the most part.

While Bolomboy waits for his next opportunity on the big stage, don’t expect him to just sit around and dream about it, though. He’ll be working harder than ever to make that dream a reality.

“Whoever is going to give me that chance, I won’t let them down,” Bolomboy said. “That’s for sure.”

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NBA Daily: New Two-Way Players Worth Watching

The deadline for adding players on two-way contracts came and went on Monday, so which new signings have the potential to make a difference this season?

Ben Nadeau



When the NBA created two-way contracts last summer, it not only produced a new path to the professional level, but it also added another intriguing wrinkle to roster building across the league. January 15th marked the deadline to sign players to two-way contracts during the 2017-18 season, so the transaction wire was mighty busy on Monday. In some instances, teams can utilize these deals to simply protect prospects as players on two-way contracts cannot be signed away by another franchise. But in other situations, these new additions could help fill some important roles and minutes for teams now currently entrenched in a playoff hunt.

Mike James was the first two-way player to make headlines while providing quality minutes within an injured backcourt for the Phoenix Suns — but that false start has recently led him to different horizons in New Orleans. While two-way players cannot compete in the postseason, there’s always the potential of a converted contract as well, just as the Milwaukee Bucks have done with Sean Kilpatrick. More than half of the NBA swapped out a two-way signee over the last 30 days, but here are five of them that could make a difference during the next few months.

Mike James, New Orleans Pelicans
With Phoenix: 10.4 points, 2.8 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 1.5 turnovers in 20.9 MPG

Mike James is the most recognizable name on the list for good reason — he’s already made it. James’ story has been well-documented at this point, but after toiling away overseas, the 27-year-old rookie wasted no time with the Suns earlier this season. In 32 games with Phoenix — including 10 starts — James averaged 10.4 points, 2.8 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 20.9 minutes per contest. In fact, James’ play was so impressive that the Suns converted his two-way contract to a one-year regular deal in December, quickly looking like he’d be a regular mainstay in the rotation. But the sudden emergence of point guard Isaiah Canaan left James as the odd-man out and he was waived, sending him back to square one in his pursuit of a permanent roster spot in the NBA.

Thankfully, James wouldn’t have to wait long as the surging Pelicans scooped him up ahead of their playoff push. The backcourt situation in New Orleans is fluid, but it could be a fruitful opportunity for James to get back on the horse. All season, the Pelicans have run with a starting combination of Rajon Rondo and Jrue Holiday, leaving veteran journeyman Jameer Nelson (21.9 MPG) to mop up any needed bench minutes for the point guards. Snagging the 14-year veteran off the waiver wire was a shrewd move by New Orleans, but it wouldn’t be a shock for James to leapfrog Nelson before long.

The Pelicans rank dead last in bench points (23.3) and James is the type of dynamic scorer that can keep things going without the starters on the floor.

Amile Jefferson, Minnesota Timberwolves
G-League: 18 points, 13.1 rebounds, 1.1 steals and 2.1 turnovers in 34.1 MPG

At long last, somebody grabbed G-League star Amile Jefferson and now the Minnesota Timberwolves are set to reap the benefits. Just a few days after dropping 29 points at the G-League Showcase, Jefferson joins a crowded frontcourt — but his high motor could be an interesting option in spot minutes moving forward. Collegiately, Jefferson started 100-plus games over five years for the Duke Blue Devils and went undrafted despite averaging 10.9 points and 8.4 rebounds as a senior. Jefferson’s bright debut has seen him tally a healthy 18 points and a league-leading 13.1 rebounds per game, but his defense-first mentality is what might earn him some court time in the coming weeks.

Head coach Tom Thibodeau has a reputation for molding elite defenses — he reached the top five in defensive rating for four consecutive seasons back in Chicago — but he hasn’t quite reached that level in Minnesota. The Timberwolves have certainly looked better in that regard as of late, but their 106.4 rating on defense puts them in the bottom half of the NBA. For a young team looking to compete with the juggernaut powers of Golden State and San Antonio this spring, tuning up the defense remains an absolute must.

Additionally, the Timberwolves’ starters average 35 minutes per game, above and beyond the highest number in the league right now. If Jefferson can provide strong defensive minutes and allow players like Karl-Anthony Towns and Taj Gibson to grab some extra rest down the stretch, he’ll be a welcomed addition to this playoff-bound roster.

Markel Brown, Houston Rockets
G-League: 17.2 points, 35.8 three-point percentage, 4.2 rebounds and 1.5 turnovers in 31.4 MPG

Unlike many of the names on this list, Markel Brown has plenty of NBA experience already. After the Brooklyn Nets drafted Brown with the No. 44 overall selection in 2014, the hyper-athletic rookie started 29 games for an injury-riddled squad. Brown would eventually become a roster casualty and later joined Russian outfit Khimki for one season, but he’s always remained a player to keep an eye on. During his best moments, Brown was a stat-stuffing machine and he once racked up 10 points, 11 rebounds, two assists, two steals and four blocks with zero turnovers in 45 minutes of play as a rookie.

Athletic as they come, Brown showed defensive promise with the Nets, but he struggled to consistently convert from deep and his 29.7 three-point percentage over two seasons ultimately cost him his roster spot. Thankfully, Brown appears to have turned the corner and has made 2.9 three-pointers per game at a 35.8 percent clip over 22 contests with the Oklahoma City Blue. Of course, the Rockets attempt a staggering 43.6 three-pointers per game, nearly 10 more than the second-place Nets, so Brown could feel right at home here.

If Brown can bring some hard-nosed defense and contribute to Houston’s downtown barrage, there’s some definite potential in this two-way signing.

Xavier Munford, Milwaukee Bucks
G-League: 23.9 points, 46.5 three-point percentage, 5.3 assists and 3.6 turnovers in 35.8 MPG

As of publishing, the Milwaukee Bucks are one of the worst three-point shooting teams in the NBA, only knocking down 34.9 percent of their attempts. And at 23-20, the Bucks’ dismal showing from deep has been just one of many shortcomings for a team many expected to take the next step this season. Khris Middleton has led the way for Milwaukee with 1.9 three-pointers per game, but his 34 percent clip is his lowest mark since his rookie season. Furthermore, the only rostered player to surpass two made three-pointers per game is Mirza Teletovic (2.1), but he’s been sidelined since November due to knee surgery and the unfortunate reemergence of pulmonary emboli in his lungs once again.

Needless to say, the Bucks need some shooting help in the worst way — enter: Xavier Munford, one of the G-League’s best three-point assassins. The 6-foot-3 guard has been an absolute revelation for the Wisconsin Herd, tallying 23.9 points, 4.8 rebounds and 5.3 assists on a league-leading 46.5 percent from three-point range. Truthfully, it’s surprising that Munford hadn’t found a home before the deadline, but he’s been gifted the perfect opportunity now. Even in spot minutes, Munford could provide the Bucks with something they’ve sorely missed through the first half of the season.

Munford can get hot and stay hot too, perhaps best exhibited by the Player of the Week honors he earned two months ago after nailing 17 of his 24 attempts (70.8 percent) from three over a four-game period. It won’t come that easy at the NBA level, but Munford is an elite shooter on a poor-shooting team — so if his chance arises, this could be a quality signing for the Bucks.

James Webb III, Brooklyn Nets
G-League: 11.6 points, 36.6 three-point percentage, 6.7 rebounds and 1.6 turnovers in 27.3 MPG

The Nets are likely the only team on the list that won’t be headed to the postseason this year, but the addition of James Webb III is certainly an interesting one nonetheless. Before going undrafted in 2016, Webb III was a standout at Boise State, where he averaged 15.8 points and 9.1 rebounds per game. In spite of shooting just 24.8 percent from three-point range in that final collegiate season, Webb III has put together back-to-back seasons at 36 percent in the G-League. Naturally, this is where Webb III can make an impression with the chuck-em-up Nets.

In his second year at the helm, head coach Kenny Atkinson has his young roster shooting more three-pointers than ever. While backcourt players like Spencer Dinwiddie, Joe Harris and Caris LeVert have all seen improvements from deep this season, the Nets still badly need a stretch four to open things up when Quincy Acy and Rondae Hollis-Jefferson aren’t on the floor. The latter, despite his best efforts, hasn’t turned into a consistent three-point shooter and Hollis-Jefferson still sports a subpar 24.1 percent career average from behind the arc.

Acy has been one of Brooklyn’s more recent G-League successes, plucking him away from the Texas Legends just over a year ago on a ten-day contract. Over 71 games for the Nets, Acy has become a valuable contributor in the Nets’ rotation and he’s currently averaging a career-high 19.3 minutes and 1.4 made three-pointers per game. Still, Acy is as streaky as shooters come and when he’s not chipping in from three-point range, the Nets really suffer. After Acy, there’s only Tyler Zeller, Timofey Mozgov and Jarrett Allen for three-point options in the frontcourt — so much for replacing Brook Lopez, right?

If Webb III can impress the coaching staff, he could have long-term potential on this three-point happy roster of castaways.

Breaking through from the G-League to the NBA is never easy, but these five players have taken the next big step in their professional careers. There’s no guarantee that two-way players will be given an opportunity to shine, but there’s still potential in all of these signings. Whether teams are looking to navigate injuries, rest their starters or uncover a diamond in the rough, two-way contracts have offered something new for both players and front offices alike.

Now it’s up to James, Jefferson, Brown, Munford and Webb III to make the most of their respective chances and hopefully stick around for good.

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NBA Daily: Milton Doyle – Next Man Up

As the Brooklyn Nets continue to search for talent, Milton Doyle could be their next G-League success story.

Ben Nadeau



Once again, the Brooklyn Nets are looking to hit another jackpot through the G-League.

First, there was Sean Kilpatrick. The year after that, there was Yogi Ferrell, a move that was then quickly followed by Spencer Dinwiddie. Even Quincy Acy has had his moments over the last 60 games in black and white as well. For a franchise in what seems like a never-ending rebuild, the Nets’ relationship with the G-League can be best described as symbiotic. Now there’s one more member in Brooklyn’s minor league machine and his name is Milton Doyle, the Nets’ newest two-way contractee.

For four years, Doyle excelled at Loyola University, a mid-sized Division I program that hasn’t reached the NCAA tournament since 1985. Doyle averaged 15.2 points, 5.1 rebounds, 4.4 assists and 1.7 steals during his senior year, but it wasn’t enough to keep the talented scorer from going undrafted last June. Shortly after, however, the Nets invited Doyle to join their summer league squad in Las Vegas and the rest, eventually, was history.

As of this season, any player without a guaranteed deal would naturally chase one of the league’s new two-way contracts and Doyle was no different. Unfortunately, the Nets opted to reward Jacob Wiley and Yakuba Ouattara with promises following training camp. Still, the G-League wasn’t about to slow Doyle down, a point-scoring gamer forever determined to make it to the NBA. In 19 games with the Long Island Nets, Doyle tallied 21.8 points, 5.8 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 1.6 steals in just a shade under 35 minutes per game — a successful start to his professional career, to say the very least.

From massive 30-point outings to buzzer-beating game-winners, Doyle had become impossible to ignore. Ranking 14th in PPG, Milton was one of the few completely untethered top scorers left auditioning in the G-League. In fact, of the 13 players outscoring Doyle, four were already on two-way contracts of their own (Antonio Blakeney, Quinn Cook, Darrun Hilliard and Johnathan Motley), while four more are already over the age of 25 (Trey Burke, Walter Lemon Jr., Justin Dentmon and Tony Mitchell).

Needless to say, Doyle, 24, wasn’t going to last much longer in the G-League without another franchise swooping in for the kill. So, in mid-December, the Nets cut their losses with Ouattara, whose injuries kept him out of all but one of Long Island’s games, and signed Doyle to a two-way deal. Doyle finally made his NBA debut late in Tuesday’s loss to the San Antonio Spurs and notched two points in garbage time. With the Nets’ glut of rotational guards — and D’Angelo Russell expected to return sooner rather than later — there’s no telling where Doyle will fit in quite yet.

Still, the Nets have officially staved off any potential poachers, anointing Doyle as the next hand-picked prospect from general manager Sean Marks.

The Nets’ tricky situation is well-documented, a once pick-deficient future made even worse by rapidly aging stars — and, to top it all off, Brooklyn is without their own first-rounder for a final time in 2018. Although this year’s pick is currently slated for just No. 10 overall, the Nets have already sacrificed the likes of Jaylen Brown and Jayson Tatum to the Boston Celtics. Of course, the Nets themselves have made no excuses for their slower-than-usual rebuild, but Marks has needed to identify and acquire talent unconventionally. The G-League is a well that the Nets have drawn from frequently since the general manager joined the franchise in 2016 — but can Doyle be the next one to impress?

Doyle comes to the Nets at an interesting crossroad — they are (still) a three-point shooting team that is so very often subpar at three-point shooting. In 2016-17, the first season under head coach Kenny Atkinson, Brooklyn shot the fourth-most three-point attempts per game at 31.6 but converted on just 33.8 percent of them – good for the 26th-worst mark in the entire league. Sadly, this season — in part thanks to devastating injuries to both Jeremy Lin and Russell — the Nets haven’t fared much better.

As of today, the Nets trail just the Houston Rockets in three-point attempts per game at 34.4 but have made just 34.5 percent of them. The re-emergence of Joe Harris, who has hit at least one three-pointer in all but three games this season, has helped steady the Nets from deep, but they’re still clearly lacking in that department. Without Lin and Russell, most of that three-point shooting onus has fallen on Allen Crabbe, a streaky shooter that has yet to find a consistent rhythm in Brooklyn.

If Doyle’s early G-League outputs are any indication, a green light in Brooklyn could be beneficial for all involved. 38 percent is, ultimately, nothing to write home about, but Doyle hit nearly 3.4 three-pointers per game to make up for it. Outside of being a smooth operator with a silky-looking jump shot — much akin to the way the aforementioned Kilpatrick broke into the league in 2016 — Doyle possesses a crafty creativity as well. Should the Nets decide to move any of their other valuable trade pieces over the next month or so, Harris included, then Doyle could be in line for some major minutes down the stretch during another playoff-barren campaign.

Admittedly, call-ups from the G-League can be a dime a dozen and 38 players made the jump in 2016-17 alone, so instant prosperity for Doyle is far from guaranteed. Just over one year ago, Marks made the incredibly unpopular decision to waive Yogi Ferrell in order to lock up Spencer Dinwiddie — two of the G-League’s best prospects last season. Although Ferrell eventually lit the league on fire with Yogi-Mania, Dinwiddie has since become one of the Nets’ most shrewd additions in years. Shoved into the starting lineup, the 6-foot-6 point guard has blossomed under Atkinson and is often the team’s de facto go-to weapon in crunch time.

Beyond hitting big shots, Dinwiddie has averaged 12.9 points, 3.2 rebounds and 6.5 assists in 27 minutes per game this season, all career-highs, and owns the second-best assist-to-turnover ratio (4.9) in the entire league. Best of all, he’s under contract for just about $1.6 million in 2018-19, which makes Dinwiddie the type of cheap asset that teams like the Nets must collect in earnest.

While the Nets can’t possibly know if Doyle is closer to Dinwiddie or Henry Sims on the sliding scale, they’ve got to like their odds pulling from the G-League again nonetheless. The Nets are still far off from completing their painstaking rebuild, but signing those like Doyle could help move that process along. For Brooklyn, the addition of Doyle represents an opportunity to develop another useful rotation piece for Atkinson’s slowly-but-surely evolving system. Since Marks’ arrival, Brooklyn has treated the G-League like an art form, unearthing quality players around every corner.

But for Doyle — after going undrafted, impressing in Las Vegas and then dominating the G-League — he’s earned this chance to impress on the big stage. At the end of the day, Doyle is one step closer to realizing his NBA dreams permanently — but gamers like him will always shoot their shot.

And frankly, that’s just what the Nets need right about now.

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