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Potential Trading Partners for Knicks in a Carmelo Trade

There are multiple reasons why the Knicks should explore trading Carmelo Anthony. Here are several potential trades involving the superstar.

Tommy Beer

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Let’s start by fast-forwarding 12 months into the future… One year from now, what’s the best-case scenario for the New York Knicks? Could they be 10 games better than they are this season? Could they be a few games above .500? Even under ideal circumstances, could they possibly be considered a championship contender?

Keep in mind: Not even including Carmelo Anthony, New York’s 2014-15 team salary will still exceed $70 million – including $49 million committed to the trio of Amar’e Stoudemire, Tyson Chandler and Andrea Bargnani for the 2014-15 season. Thus, Knicks GM Steve Mills will have very limited roster flexibility this summer. Because New York will be over the cap, they will not be able to reel in any significant free agents. They also don’t have either their first or second-round pick to improve the roster.

This is something Anthony will have to consider this summer when he has to make a life-altering decision in July. Will Anthony be willing to essentially sacrifice another year of his prime? Has the Knicks organization exhibited an ability to build a winner?

Looking at the big picture, are the Knicks completely convinced Anthony will be willing to commit to the Knicks long-term?

Of course, he’d have to be willing to leave $30 million on the table to play elsewhere, and the Knicks will have cap space to spend money in the summer of 2015.

Still, are the Knicks 100 percent sure that they can keep Carmelo? If they are not, they are taking a huge risk by not trading him prior to the February 20 trade deadline. Once that date passes, Anthony holds all the power. He will be the one making the important decisions.

Interestingly, as I have argued over the last couple of months, ‘Melo leaving the Knicks high-and-dry would not actually be the worst-case scenario. Considering all the long-term ramifications, committing $129.1 million to a 30-year-old Anthony might actually be the more detrimental outcome. The Knicks are 11 games under .500 with a healthy, in-his-prime Anthony playing at an incredibly high level. What happens as he ages and his skills deteriorate, while at the same time his salary escalates? Remember, if the Knicks max him out, ‘Melo will pocket a cool $29.1 million in 2018-19, when he’ll turn 34 years old.

Thus, there are multiple reasons to believe the Knicks should, at the very least, explore all options when it comes to trading away their best player.

Despite being fully aware that, in all likelihood, owner James Dolan won’t even consider trading away Anthony, last week I looked at a potential deal between the Knicks and Bulls that could possibly benefit both organizations.

Today, let’s get creative and examine a few other potential landing spots for Anthony that make sense for both the Knicks and their trading partner.

New York and Phoenix

Knicks send: Carmelo Anthony and Raymond Felton and $2 million in cash

Suns send: Emeka Okafor, Goran Dragic, 2014 first-round draft pick, and a 2015 first-round pick

Why it makes sense for the Knicks: Dragic, who is playing incredibly well this season, would finally solve the Knicks gaping hole at point guard. Okafor’s value lies in the fact that his insured deal expires at the end of this season. The draft picks would obviously help re-stock the cupboard with top-tier rookies. Including Felton in the deal would wipe his salary off the books and increase the Knicks spending budget in the summer of 2015.

Why it makes sense for the Suns: Amazingly, Phoenix will have a total of six first-round picks in 2014 and 2015, including up to four selections in the first round of the loaded 2014 draft. Thus, they could be looking to package a couple of those picks for a player that will provide immediate benefit.

Furthermore, sitting 10 games above .500 with a 30-20 record, the Suns have been one of the NBA’s pleasant surprises this season. And it appears they unearthed a gem in Eric Bledsoe. As a result, there have been rumors they are willing to move Dragic in the right deal, as they are going to have to shell out major money in order to re-sign Bledsoe this summer.

If they traded for Anthony, they would secure his Bird Rights and could then pay him far more than any other team. In addition, they could surround him with a rising star in Bledsoe and a bevy of young, promising bigs: Markieff and Marcus Morris, Miles Plumlee and Alex Len. They will also have all those picks in a deep draft that could certainly supplement the depth on any roster. If the Suns are serious about making a major push towards legitimacy, they could do just that in one fell swoop.

New York and Memphis

Knicks send: Carmelo Anthony, Raymond Felton and J.R. Smith

Grizzlies send: Zach Randolph, Tayshaun Prince, Ed Davis, Kosta Koufos and a future first-round pick

Why it makes sense for the Knicks: If the Knicks do actually seriously consider trading Anthony, one option to explore would be fully committing to a full, complete rebuild/overhaul. This is the type of trade that would allow the Knicks to hit the reset button, tear the whole thing down to the studs and start fresh on July 1, 2015. If New York was able to move ‘Melo, Smith and Felton, the Knicks would be looking at over $50 million in cap space in 2015. If the Knicks have the most cap space in the league heading into the summer of 2015 (All four Grizzlies coming over have two or less years left on their contracts), it could make for a very interesting offseason in NYC – especially considering the free agent class that year could include names such as Kevin Love, LaMarcus Aldridge, Rajon Rondo, Paul Millsap, Marc Gasol, Al Jefferson, Tony Parker, Roy Hibbert, DeAndre Jordan, etc.

If ‘Melo re-signs with the Knicks for the max this summer, he’ll be on the books for $24.1 million in 2015-16. Could that money and cap space be better spent on a pair of younger studs? Granted, relying on free agency is always a gamble, but so is guaranteeing a 30-year-old scorer $129 million through 2019.

It could certainly be argued that in the unlikely event that the Knicks do decide to move ‘Melo, this is the way to go. Blow the whole thing up and start from scratch. This type of deal gives Steve Mills and Jim Dolan maximum flexibility in 2015 (as opposed to be saddled with a maximum contract). Once ‘Melo is moved in this scenario, you try to trade Chandler and get back additional assets. In this particular situation, they would also look to quickly flip Randolph as well.

Why it works for Memphis: The Grizzlies were legit contenders for the crown last season, advancing all the way to the Western Conference Finals. They have struggled over the first half of this season, due largely to injuries, but are still in middle of the pack out West.

Adding a superstar such as Carmelo Anthony would obviously revive hopes and increase expectations in Memphis. Anthony, flanked by a healthy Marc Gasol, Mike Conley and Tony Allen would be a formidable and dangerous squad.

New York and Dallas

Knicks send: Carmelo Anthony, J.R. Smith and Cole Aldrich

Dallas sends: Shawn Marion, Shane Larkin, Brandan Wright, Samuel Dalembert, Wayne Ellington, Ricky Ledo and two future first-round picks

Why it makes sense for the Knicks: Larkin, the 18th overall pick in the 2013 draft, is a young point guard with some promise, and is locked into a very cap-friendly rookie contract. Wright is a former lottery pick that has exhibited flashes of potential. Dalembert and Ellington’s deals expire in 2015. Ledo is raw but talented.

Why it makes sense for Dallas: We know Mark Cuban has money and that he isn’t afraid to spend it. Would be willing to give ‘Melo the max contract he’ll be looking for?

Having three potent scorers in Dirk Nowitzki, Monta Ellis and Anthony on the floor together (with Jose Calderon facilitating the offense) would be fascinating to watch. Defense would obviously be an issue, but this team would be an awfully scary postseason opponent.

New York and Washington

Knicks send: Carmelo Anthony, Beno Udrih, Kenyon Martin and Cole Aldrich

Wizards send: Marcin Gortat, Otto Porter Jr., Trevor Ariza, Jan Vesely, Chris Singleton, 2014 second-round pick and 2016 first-round pick

Why it makes sense for the Knicks: Otto Porter, the No. 3 overall pick last June, has not lived up to expectations during his rookie season, but showed during his collegiate career at Georgetown that he possesses a unique and enticing skill set. Vesely and Singleton have also disappointed during their career in the nation’s capital, but could their career’s be revived in NYC? Ariza has played well this season and has just one year left on his deal. The Wizards owe their 2014 first-rounder to the Suns (top-12 protected), so the earliest first rounder they could trade would be their 2016 pick.

Gortat is set to become a free agent after this season. If the Knicks didn’t view his as their “center of the future,” they could try to flip him in a convoluted three-way deal, in an attempt to acquire younger players or picks. However, from a New York perspective, this deal would primarily come down to how they felt about Porter.

Why it makes sense for the Wizards: Washington has finally climbed out of the Eastern Conference basement after spending seemingly an eternity below .500. They have their franchise point guard (John Wall) and shooting guard (Bradley Beal) in place. Bringing in a veteran superstar like Carmelo Anthony, could be the piece that transforms them into a real threat overnight.

New York and Boston –

Knicks send: Carmelo Anthony and Kenyon Martin

Celtics send: Kris Humphries, Brandon Bass, Kelly Olynyk, Jared Sullinger and a 2014 first-round pick

Why it makes sense for the Knicks: Sullinger has been a beast in Boston of late, averaging 19.8 points and 12.8 rebounds per contest over the last three weeks. Olynyk has been inconsistent during his rookie campaign, but possesses the size and athleticism that scouts and coaches love. Both players are locked into extremely affordable rookie-scale contracts. Humphries has one year left on his deal, and Bass has two, so both will be off the books by 2015.

Why it makes sense for the Celtics: GM Danny Ainge has, on multiple occasions, adamantly attempted to squelch rumors that the Celtics intend to trade Rajon Rondo. A move like this would certainly send the message loud and clear that C’s have no interest in tanking or a long-term rebuilding project. We’d have to assume this would make Rondo happy, increasing the chances he agrees to a long-term deal with the Celtics.

Boston could have as many as five first-round picks over the next two seasons, so trading one away would not be crippling. It would be a major roll of the dice by Ainge and the Celtics; one that would cause a seismic shift in the Atlantic Division.

 

Tommy Beer is a Senior NBA Analyst and the Fantasy Sports Editor of Basketball Insiders, having covered the NBA for the last nine seasons.

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NBA AM: Is This It for Indiana?

Following their major drop-off, Matt John explains why the Pacers trying to get back to where they were may not be the best decision.

Matt John

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Remember when, following the maligned trade of Paul George, the sky was the limit for the Indiana Pacers? The 2017-18 Pacers were one of the best stories in the NBA that season because they made their opponents work for their victories, and they put on a spectacle every night.

It’s hard to believe that all transpired three whole years ago. When Cleveland eliminated Indiana in a very tight first-round series, I asked if having the exciting season that they did – when many thought it would turn out the opposite – was going to benefit them in the long run. Three years later, this happens.

We were getting plenty of smoke about the Pacers’ drama behind-the-scenes beforehand, and now, we have seen the fire firsthand. More and more reports indicate that the crap has hit the fan. Indiana has seemingly already had enough of Nate Bjorkgren in only his first year as his coach. When you see the results they’ve had this season compared to the last three, it’s not hard to see why.

The Pacers have routinely found themselves in the 4-5 playoff matchup for the last three years. Sadly, despite their fight – and, to be fair, they had pretty awful injury luck the past two postseasons – they haven’t been able to get over the hump in the first round. They may not have been in the elite tier, but they weren’t slouches either. So, seeing them not only fail to take the next step but look more and more likely for the play-in is as discouraging as it gets. Especially after they started the season 6-2.

If these reports about the tensions between the players and Bjorkgren are real, then this has already become a lost season for the Pacers. It’s too late in the season to make any major personnel changes. At this point, their best route is just to cut their losses and wait until this summer to think over what the next move is.

In that case, let’s take a deep breath. This has been a weird season for everyone. Every aspect minus the playoffs has been shorter than usual since last October. Everything was shortened from the offseason to the regular season. Oh, and COVID-19 has played a role as the season has turned out, although COVID-19 has probably been the least of Indy’s problems. Let’s think about what next season would look like for Indiana.

TJ Warren comes back with a clean bill of health. Caris Levert gets more acquainted with the team and how they run. Who knows? Maybe they finally resolve the Myles Turner-Domantas Sabonis situation once and for all. A new coach can come aboard to steady the ship, and it already looks like they have an idea for who that’s going to be

Should they run it back, there’s a solid chance they can get back to where they were before. But that’s sort of the problem to begin with. Even if this recent Pacers’ season turns out to be just a negative outlier, their ceiling isn’t all too high anyway. A team that consists of Warren, Domantas Sabonis, Malcolm Brogdon, and Caris Levert as their core four is a solid playoff team. Having Turner, Doug McDermott, TJ McConnell, Jeremy Lamb, and the Holiday brothers rounds out a solid playoff team. Anyone who takes a good look at this roster knows that this roster is a good one. It’s not great though.

Just to be clear, Indiana has plenty of ingredients for a championship team. They just don’t have the main one: The franchise player. Once upon a time, it looked like that may have been Oladipo, but a cruel twist of fate took that all away. This isn’t a shot at any of the quality players they have on their roster, but think of it this way.

For the next couple of years, they’re going to go up against Kevin Durant, James Harden, and Kyrie Irving. All of whom are on the same team. For potentially even longer, they’ll be going up against the likes of Giannis Antetoukounmpo, Joel Embiid, and Jayson Tatum. With the roster they have, they could make a series interesting against any one of those teams. However, it’s a rule of thumb in the NBA that the team with the best player usually wins the series. Not to mention, they’d have to beat most of the teams those players play for to go on a substantial playoff run. That’s a pretty tall order.

There’s no joy in talking about the Pacers like this because they have built this overachieving underdog from nothing more than shrewd executive work. They turned a disgruntled and expiring Paul George into Oladipo and Sabonis. Both of whom have since become two-time all-stars (and counting). They then managed to turn an expiring and hobbled Oladipo – who had no plans to return to Indiana – into the electric Levert. They also pretty much stole Brogdon and Warren away while paying very little for either of them.

That is fantastic work. The only hangup is that, as of now, it just doesn’t seem like it will be enough. But, doubt and skepticism are things Indiana’s had thrown their way consistently since 2017. Many thought their approach to trading Paul George would blow up in their face, and since then, they’ve done everything in their power to make everyone eat their words.

Kevin Pritchard’s got his work cut out for him this summer. This season will hopefully turn out to be nothing more than performance ruined by both the wrong coaching hire and an unusual season that produced negatively skewed results. But at this point, Pritchard’s upcoming course of action this summer shouldn’t be about getting his team back to where they were, but deciding whether he can get them a step or two further than that by adding more to what they have or starting over completely.

Indiana’s had a rough go of it in this COVID-shortened season, but their disappointing play may have little to no bearing on where they go from here.

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NBA Rookie of the Year Watch – May 6

With the regular season winding down, Tristan Tucker offers his latest Rookie of the Year ladder, with three outstanding freshman performances leading the pack.

Tristan Tucker

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With the NBA season winding down, there is limited left time for rookies to make their cases for the Rookie of the Year award. In all, three rookies are leading the charge and will likely be named the top three rookies of the season. Without further ado, let’s take a look at how the race has changed over the last few weeks.

1. Anthony Edwards, Minnesota Timberwolves (Previous: 1)

Rookies shouldn’t be able to do what Anthony Edwards can do. Edwards is still just a teenager, but he possesses some of the best natural talent the NBA has seen. Furthermore, there aren’t many rookies that have quite seen the game-by-game improvement that Edwards has shown.

On the year, Edwards is averaging 18.9 points, 4.7 rebounds and 2.8 assists per game while shooting 41 percent from the floor and 32.8 percent from three. But to take a look at his improvement, Edwards’ numbers before and after the All-Star break paint the picture.

Before the All-Star break, Edwards averaged 14.9 points and 2.5 assists per game while shooting 37.1 percent from the floor and 30.2 percent from deep in 36 games. In the 30 games since then, Edwards is shooting a much better line of 44.7/35.2/75.2 and is averaging 23.7 points and 3.2 assists per game.

In his most recent 42-point outburst, which tied his career-high, Edwards broke the franchise record for most threes made in a game by a rookie. There’s a consensus in Minnesota that this won’t be the last record the rookie breaks.

2. LaMelo Ball, Charlotte Hornets (Previous: Not Ranked)

Ball’s previous “not ranked” placement wasn’t a dig at him but instead an unfortunate testament to when the league thought he was out for the season with an injury. And then, miraculously, Ball returned just in time for a likely Charlotte postseason appearance. Because of his return and ensuing excellent play, Ball is penciled into one of the top two slots to end the year.

Although he likely missed too much time to be named Rookie of the Year, Ball’s first season is something to behold. On the year, Ball is averaging 15.9 points, 5.9 rebounds, 6.1 assists and 1.6 steals and is a team leader for an exciting Hornets squad. Furthermore, Ball proved to be a much better three-point shooter than most thought he would be, connecting at 37.3 percent.

Ball is still over 100 days from turning 20-years-old and he’s already one of Charlotte’s best players. 

3. Tyrese Haliburton, Sacramento Kings (Previous: 2)

The timing of Haliburton’s injury is unfortunate, as it quickly followed the loss of De’Aaron Fox that all but sealed Sacramento’s postseason hopes. However, Haliburton showed that the franchise has much to look forward to with his explosive and competent play.

While Haliburton had some up-and-down moments and didn’t get the starting opportunities of Ball and Edwards, he still had a fantastic year. Since his injury will likely take him out for the remainder of the regular season, Haliburton finished the year averaging 13 points per game. To go along with his fantastic scoring, Haliburton blossomed as a polished playmaker, averaging 5.3 assists per night.

In the five games he started at point guard without Fox in the rotation, Haliburton averaged a fantastic 17 points, 8.2 assists and 1.6 steals per game. Once they reach their respective peaks, Fox and Haliburton have the talent to hang with the best of the backcourts in the NBA.

If that wasn’t impressive enough, Haliburton showed a great shooting form with fantastic results. The guard out of Iowa State shot 47.2 percent from the floor to go along with a 40.9 percent clip from three on over five attempts per game. While Haliburton isn’t likely to come away with the award, he certainly showed that several teams made mistakes in passing on him.

4. Saddiq Bey, Detroit Pistons (Previous: 3)

Bey won’t end up in the top three of voting for the Rookie of the Year award, but he still set his name in the record books. Bey’s been a historically good three-point shooter, currently connecting at a 37.9 percent clip from deep on 6.4 attempts per game.

The rookie out Villanova currently sits at 11th all-time for three-pointers made as a rookie, tied with Edwards, with 155. However, Bey needs just 14 more threes to jump all the way up to third all-time. With six games remaining in Detroit’s schedule, there’s even more opportunity for Bey to make history.

5. Jae’Sean Tate, Houston Rockets (Previous: 4)

While there weren’t many bright spots for a Rockets season filled with turmoil, the team’s rookies and sophomores looked impressive. From Kevin Porter Jr. to Kenyon Martin Jr. to Tate, this team boasts some of the most underrated young talent in the league.

Tate in particular had an outstanding rookie season that is now likely over due to his entry into the health and safety protocols. If this truly is the end of the year for Tate, he wrapped up the year averaging 11.2 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.3 steals per game while shooting 51.3 percent from the field.

Since Basketball Insiders’ last rookie ladder, Tate averaged 12.9 points and upped his offensive production to 3.9 assists per game.

Tate is the ultimate hustle player and is a glue guy that championship contenders need to take it to the next level. Look for the Rockets to be much more competitive next season under a good coach in Stephen Silas and a potential top pick to join a talented young corps.

6. Immanuel Quickley, New York Knicks (Previous: NR)

Like Bey, Quickley quickly became one of the best shooters in the draft class, but also offered promising guard play for a competitive Knicks squad. Because of stellar performances up and down the roster, the Knicks look likely to return to the postseason for the first time since 2012-13.

While Quickley stagnated a bit toward the middle and end of his rookie season, he still held down the backup guard spot for New York. On the year, Quickley is averaging 11.7 points and 2.1 assists per game while shooting 39.7 percent from downtown.

Ultimately, the Rookie of the Year race is going to come down to the wire between Edwards and Ball. For a 2020 rookie class that originally looked bleak, these rookies have vastly altered that perspective. Even though much is left to be determined for the eventual award winner, one thing is certain: the league is in good hands.

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NBA

NBA Daily: Torrey Craig Relishing Role in Phoenix

The NBA trade deadline was busy as a number of high-profile players were moved. One name that went under the radar was Torrey Craig, who is making a major impact in his new home as the Phoenix Suns battle for the best record in the league.

Chad Smith

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The last time the Phoenix Suns played in a playoff game, Deandre Ayton was 11 years old. Not only is Phoenix back in the postseason, but they will also be one of the top seeds in the loaded Western Conference.

The emergence of the Suns as a championship contender may have started in the Orlando bubble last season. Chris Paul saw something he liked and has mentioned that numerous times as to why he wanted to play in Phoenix. His arrival solidified their aspirations, but this team is much more than just the future Hall-of-Fame point guard.

The pieces in Phoenix fit like a puzzle. Devin Booker is still the key player that opposing teams have at the top of their scouting report. Ayton has continued his development, which has been aided by Paul’s tutelage. Mikal Bridges has exploded onto the scene as one of the best young, two-way players in the league. Like every championship-contending team, there are valuable role players that fill out the roster.

Dario Saric and Frank Kaminsky have been excellent additions throughout the season. Cameron Johnson continues to play a solid role and reclamation projects like Cameron Payne and Jevon Carter have given this team a much-needed boost of energy off the bench. They have made it difficult for Monty Williams to even find minutes for solid veterans such as E’Twaun Moore and Langston Galloway.

Jae Crowder has been one of the best offseason acquisitions in the league. He has missed the last eight games with a sprained right ankle, which has opened the door of opportunity for others. Torrey Craig has taken this opportunity and flourished.

Crowder has always played for winning teams over the course of his career, and Craig appears to be following suit. After going undrafted out of USC Upstate, he signed a two-way contract with the Denver Nuggets in the summer of 2017. That turned into a multi-year contract before he joined the Milwaukee Bucks as a free agent this past offseason. On March 18, the Bucks traded Craig to the Suns in exchange for cash and a trade exception.

Denver’s defense suffered when Craig left and for whatever reason, he did not see the floor much in Milwaukee. Given ample opportunity, he seemed like he would be a perfect fit in their system. Even after battling through a groin injury and a broken nose, it just didn’t work out in Milwaukee.

Since joining the Suns, Craig is getting plenty of minutes and making the most of them. In April, he averaged more than 18 minutes per game and shot the ball with high efficiency. Not known as a great shooter, he hit 39 percent of his three-pointers and shot 51 percent overall from the floor. Against the Brooklyn Nets, he scored 20 points and grabbed 14 rebounds. On Sunday against the Oklahoma City Thunder, Craig poured in 18 points, 10 rebounds and 2 blocks in a starting role where he went 8-10 from the floor.

Craig’s greatest strength is his defense, and he is well aware of that. One thing Phoenix has been lacking is the wing player that can defend the premier players in the league. It takes a special skill set to defend the likes of LeBron James, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Kevin Durant, Kawhi Leonard, Luka Doncic, etc. He has the size, athleticism and the little things that can’t be taught. With Crowder out and Bridges still needing to add more muscle, Craig’s role is crystal clear.

It often takes players time to get acclimated to new situations. They have new teammates and learning the ins and outs of the system can be a tough task. Meeting the demands of leaders like Paul can be tantalizing as well. To his credit, Craig has fit like a glove, doing everything asked of him and doing it well. This seemingly small transaction at the trade deadline could pay major dividends for the Suns.

Six regular-season games remain for Phoenix, who will have one of the top two seeds in the Western Conference. Playoff basketball is much different than the regular season, as the defensive temperature goes up a few notches. Game planning and defensive schemes play a large role in the outcome of playoff games, which makes Craig even more valuable.

While the Suns are capable of scoring with anyone, it is their defense that makes them elite. They currently have the second-best net rating in the league, the sixth-best defensive rating and are seventh in opponents scoring. Their team defense is incredible but individually, they have sensational defenders at every position. Phoenix currently has four players in the top 30 of Defensive RPM with Ayton and Paul both inside the top ten.

Another thing this Suns team lacks is playoff experience. Aside from Paul and Crowder, none of the players on this roster have many postseason games under their belt. Craig has played in 33 postseason games in his career and brings valuable experience to this young team. With his improved shooting, he is another weapon that Monty Williams can use in these high-pressure games.

Craig wasn’t drafted when he finished his college career. He played overseas for three years, waiting on his next opportunity. He joined the G-League and finally got called up to help the Nuggets. In his first career game, Denver put him on Jrue Holiday in the closing seconds of the game. Craig blocked his potential game-winning shot and Denver won the game in overtime.

Sometimes it takes people more time to notice the blessings they have been given. Phoenix is fully cognizant of the player they have in Craig. Monty knows, Paul and Booker know and, soon, the rest of the league will realize just how good he is.

It’s been a long journey for Craig, but he could reach the top of the mountain very soon. The Suns have some big plans, and he is a key part of them.

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