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NBA Daily: Clippers Must Address Numerous Issues This Offseason

With a roster in flux and multiple first-round draft picks, the Clippers have a lot of key decisions to make this offseason, writes James Blancarte

James Blancarte

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It has been almost two months since the Los Angeles Clippers last took to the hardwood. The team fought through injuries and was in range of making the playoffs in a season that never really went according to plan. Despite the team’s best efforts, the Clippers ultimately failed to qualify for the NBA’s postseason. While the Clippers were unable to make it to the playoffs, their first failure to do so since 2011, they did show resilience and determination.

Clippers head coach Doc Rivers was previously critcized for manufacturing his departure from the Boston Celtics to avoid overseeing that team’s rebuild. Last season, the Clippers attempted to rebuild on the fly with the offseason trade of Chris Paul and the midseason trade of Blake Griffin. While it did not result in playoff success, Rivers found himself willing to stick with the franchise, which was very dependent on young and largerly unproven players. Confirming his ongoing commitment to this process, Rivers accepted a contract extension a few weeks ago, keeping him at the head of the Clippers ship for the next few years. Rivers put out a statement noting that the “team battled through many challenges and much adversity, proving deep talent and even greater potential.”

With their head coach firmly rooted in place, the team has its sights set on the draft as the next stage of retooling. Looking back at last season, the team made the most of a draft with no first-round picks available. The franchise acquired the rights to guard Sindarius Thornwell in exchange for cash considerations. Thornwell had originally been selected 48th in the draft by the Milwaukee Bucks. The Clippers were certainly able to yield value out of the lauded transaction as Thornwell proved capable of producing when needed due to various injuries on the wing and remains a useful prospect role player going forward. The Clippers also acquired the draft rights to Oklahoma State guard Jawun Evans (picked 39th overall) from the Philadelphia 76ers in exchange for cash considerations. Evans suffered through injuries but also proved himself to be an effective lead guard off the bench.

Currently, guard Austin Rivers, guard Milos Teodosic and center DeAndre Jordan have player options available to them and accordingly the right to depart L.A. In addition, guard Avery Bradley could depart as an unrestricted free agent. Austin Rivers has not decided whether to exercise his player option for next season, Tomer Azarly of Clutch Points reports. With the roster in flux, the Clippers need to consider their options and prepare to fill in vacancies that could be left by departing players.

The Clippers enter the 2018 NBA Draft with two first-round draft picks, which could prove extremely helpful in adding youth and talent to the roster. Should the team elect to stand pat, they will have the opportunity to select from several talented prospects. With no single position of need obvious, the team has an opportunity to simply allow talent and potential dictate who gets the call at the number 12 and 13 spots of the draft.

Various publications and mock drafts suggest that the Clippers, depending on how the draft shakes out, will likely select some combination of the following players: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Collin Sexton, Miles Bridges, Kevin Knox, Troy Brown, Michael Porter, Jr., Lonnie Walker, Robert Williams or Zhaire Smith. Of course, a number of these players may unavailable when the Clippers make their selections. Michael Porter, Jr. Kevin Knox, Collin Sexton and Miles Bridges may all be off the board when the Clippers make their selections.

Porter, Jr. has great scoring potential but any chance the team has of drafting him would be predicated on his stock falling due to long-term health concerns regarding his back. Sexton is a solid choice and could give the team a long-term option at point guard. Currently, Teodosic, already in his thirties, and Patrick Beverley, coming back from microfracture knee surgery, do not represent a long-term plan at the point. Gilgeous-Alexander of Kentucky represents a realistic choice as to availability and fit. Teams are always eager for a capable player and defender on the wing and the Kentucky product has shown the potential to play on and off the ball and defend multiple positions. Knox and Walker represent the potential so many teams hope for and could be steals if selected 12th or 13th overall. Williams is a Texas A&M product and an athletic rim-running center who doesn’t need the ball to be successful which sounds very similar to a young DeAndre Jordan. With the very real prospect of a Jordan’s departure this summer or next, many see the Clippers possibly taking Williams as the logical player to replace Jordan long-term.

The Clippers have been holding workouts, which includes a few of the above players, and others, as the team nears the draft. Basketball Insiders Eric Pincus confirmed a workout between Brown and Smith earlier this week for the Clippers.

Whoever is ultimately chosen, the team has a unique opportunity to bolster its overall talent level with two Lottery picks. This comes at a critical time as the team, for the first time in the coach Rivers era, made great use of younger players rather than veterans on the tailend of their respective careers.

An added benefit of having the Lottery picks is the more remote opportunity the team uses them to facilitate other transactions. Observers of the league were somewhat stunned when, instead of having Paul re-sign or simply depart via free agency last summer, the team was instead able to facilitate Paul’s desire to join the Rockets through a sign and trade that yielded the Clippers much-needed assets in return. The even more unexpected Griffin trade yielded relief from Griffin’s newly signed and very expensive contract in exchange for younger talent and future flexibility.

Now the team, headed by Lawrence Frank and Jerry West, has the opportunity to flip either pick, trade up or down in the draft or maneuver the team to acquire any of the potential big name free agents that have been rumored as available the last few months. While the prospect of landing LeBron James, Paul George, or Kawhi Leonard (via trade) is highly unlikely, the Clippers have recently made surprising and aggressive moves recently. The Clippers must deal with a roster that has a lot of moving parts and with an aggressive front office, two Lottery picks and other moveable assets, the Clippers are in position to address multiple issues in preparation for next season and beyond.

James Blancarte is a writer for Basketball Insiders. He is also an Attorney based in Los Angeles, California.

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NBA

NBA Daily: Indiana’s X-Factor, Malcolm Brogdon

A reshaped roster and injury concerns cloud Indiana’s season outlook. But their success or failure rests on the shoulders of their new starting point guard and the many-changing roles he will play.

Chad Smith

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Over the past few seasons, the Indiana Pacers have relied upon familiarity and continuity within their roster. That will not be the case this year, as the organization massively reshaped their team over the summer.

The biggest move that the Pacers made was acquiring restricted free agent guard Malcolm Brogdon from the Milwaukee Bucks. The price was steep, both in terms of the contract dollars and the number of assets given up. For Indiana though, it was a price worth paying.

Of course, for starters, Brogdon was the first second-round pick to win the Rookie of the Year Award since Willis Reed in 1965. Last season, the 26-year old became just the eighth player in NBA history to achieve a 50-40-90 season, while his 93 percent free throw rate was the best in the league. Among guards, Brogdon had the fourth-best effective field goal percentage.

The numbers are fantastic, but how will the three-year veteran fit into the Pacers’ system? Several factors will determine that. Chief among them is the absence of the franchise player, Victor Oladipo. The All-Star guard is recovering from a devastating long-term injury and is not expected to be back on the floor until after Christmas.

In Milwaukee, Brogdon was thrust into many different positions but was never a ball-dominant point guard, owning a usage rate of just about 20 percent. Giannis Antetokounmpo, the newly-crowned MVP, did many things for the Bucks, including handling the ball and drawing in defenders. The spacing will not be the same for Brogdon in Indiana, especially without Oladipo.

On paper, the Brogdon fit seems perfect. In the initial stages of the season, he will need to be the motor for the offense. He is terrific with the ball going downhill and getting into the teeth of the defense — a feat that results in a high number of kick-outs and free throw attempts.

The biggest concern will be if he is still able to maximize that part of his game with two big men on the floor — spacing is everything. Last season, Brogdon shot 31 percent from downtown when a defender was more than six feet away. He has a slow release, so the best solution might be to use Domantas Sabonis as a pivot point for the offense. Notably, Brogdon is exceptional at making plays coming off of a dribble handoff.

Indiana’s first 11 games are very favorable, too, and they will travel to India for a pair of preseason games against the Sacramento Kings. Brogdon will have ample time to gel with the team before Oladipo is healthy. When that time comes, Brogdon should have no problem sliding into the role of an off-ball initiator. He is a malleable backcourt pairing for Oladipo, easily taking the pressure off of him without actually taking anything away from him.

Standing at 6-foot-5 with a 6-foot-10 wingspan, Brogdon will be a sizeable upgrade over Darren Collison. His size, length and defensive prowess will be a welcomed addition to the backcourt. During his senior campaign at Virginia, Malcolm became the first player in ACC history to win both Player of the Year and Defensive Player of the Year in the same season. With Indiana’s already massive frontcourt, the Pacers will boast one of the larger starting lineups in the league.

While Brogdon may not be at the top of the opposing team’s scouting report, he has been the picture of consistency throughout his career. He has done so while working with both the starters and the second unit too. He has three years of playoff experience that he brings to the table, but staying healthy may be his biggest challenge.

After missing an entire season in college due to a foot problem, the injuries followed Brogdon to the NBA. He has played in just 187 games in three full seasons. Last year, Malcolm missed seven weeks with a plantar fascia tear in his right foot. He appeared in just 48 games the year before that, after suffering a partially torn quad tendon. Still, the potential is undeniable.

Despite the injuries, Brogdon has improved his field goal percentage, free throw percentage, rebounding and scoring averages each year. His leadership and ability to play multiple positions is something the Pacers will lean on heavily in the first few months of the season — and will continue to do so even after Oladipo makes his way back.

Given the circumstances, the Pacers’ success this season will hinge heavily on the shoulders of a second-round pick. Then again, Brogdon has already proven that he is so much more than that.

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NBA

NBA Daily: The Most Underrated Departures

A lot can be made about the under-the-radar players that teams pick up, but not enough is made about the under-the-radar players that teams lose. Matt John elaborates.

Matt John

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When comparing the loss of a star player to the loss of a glue player, there’s no question which one is worse. Losing a star can set back a franchise for years, with so many questions surrounding what they should do next in light of his departure. Losing a glue player doesn’t make as much of a sting, but it can make all the difference in a playoff series.

It’s a shame that Golden State had all the injuries that it did. Because, had the Warriors been at full health, we would have seen one of the most obvious advantages the Raptors had over them – their glue guys. The Raptors had plenty of them at their disposal while the Warriors’ glue guys had slowly disintegrated into a shell of the depth they once had.

Before Durant’s injury, Golden State had enough star power to match up with Toronto’s, but Toronto’s glue players rounded out the edges whereas Golden State’s could not. That made a big difference in how the NBA Finals turned out.

Which brings us to this summer. This may have been the most epic player movement in one offseason. The highlight has been the movement among the players considered among the upper class.

A fair amount of quality teams lost their star players this year. Golden State lost Kevin Durant. Boston lost Kyrie Irving. Philadelphia lost Jimmy Butler. None of these teams replaced their departed stars with players who can do everything they can, but their replacements can do enough to keep the team afloat.

It’s a rarity to see playoff teams that lose their star players make such an effort to replace them. What’s not a rarity is that these teams also lost some of their glue players in the process. Since so many big names switched teams this offseason, their decisions have overshadowed the role players who have done the same.

This won’t be the case next summer when the NBA has one of its weakest free agency classes it’s had in years, but not enough has been made about the glue guys who find themselves on different teams this summer. Let’s take a look at who would fit that bill.

JJ Redick – Philadelphia 76ers

The acquisitions of Josh Richardson and Al Horford – on top of paying top dollar to re-sign Tobias Harris – has overshadowed the loss of the man who helped kick “The Process” into a higher gear.

Redick was a brilliant addition for the 76ers. With Simmons slated to play his rookie year and Embiid itching to capitalize on his promising rookie season, Philadelphia knew that it was too good to be a bottom dweller. With the centerpieces coming into place, the team needed immediate help. With all the cap room in the world, it added a surefire contributor with Redick.

JJ’s all-around abilities as a player are not what they once were, but what he is best at showed up so beautifully that it made him worth every penny in Philly. Because Philly used his elite three-point shooting as a focal point of its offense, Redick averaged career-highs in points per game in his two years as a Sixer.

Averaging 17.1 points per game in one season then 18 the next doesn’t usually happen with players entering their mid-thirties. The 76ers basically used JJ the same way the Hawks used Kyle Korver, only at a higher volume. Offensively, he may have never looked better in his entire career.

Because Redick’s shooting fit so snugly next to Simmons and Embiid – the three-man trio was the most used three-man lineup by Philly last year – his three-point shot became a weapon. Now that weapon is gone.

Richardson and Horford are adequate three-point shooters, but their ability to shoot the longball isn’t as intimidating as Redick’s is. Compared to Redick, their three-point shots are not accurate nor quick enough that other teams would frantically do everything to make sure their shot couldn’t see a glimmer of daylight.

The Sixers should be fine this season, but adjusting to Redick is not going to be easy. Especially for Simmons and Embiid, who lest we forget are their two cornerstones.

Aron Baynes – Boston Celtics

There was some temptation to put Al Horford on this list, but those in the know can see clear as day that going from Horford to Enes Kanter is a downgrade for the Celtics. Boston’s going to miss Horford the most out of all the players it lost, but losing Baynes is really going hurt the team’s defense in the post.

There are lots of reasons as to why the Celtics disappointed as badly as they did. There’s no reason to rehash everything because you probably saw it yourself. In regards what Baynes has to do with it, well, an injury-plagued season had him play in only 51 games.

In the 31 games that Baynes was absent, the Celtics went 17-14. When taking into effect that the Celtics won 49 games in total, it’s not totally out of left field to suggest that maybe they could have added a few more wins, and then some, had Baynes avoided the injury bug.

His unavailability definitely played a role in how the Celtics defensive rating went from 103.8 to 108 in 2019. Since the defense allowed 4.8 fewer points per 100 possessions with him on the floor – the highest among players who played 800 minutes or more – they missed what he could do when he was out last season, and it’ll be the same reason why they’re going to miss him in his entirety this season.

To make things worse, Baynes and Horford made for one terrific frontcourt duo. In their first season, the two of them together combined for a defensive rating of 95.5. The next season, that defensive rating was 98.5. Baynes doesn’t have the typical criteria for a shot-blocker, but the results speak for themselves. When he’s on the court, he makes life hell in the paint.

Boston had to trade him in order to get the cap space to bring Kemba Walker in. With a star like that, sacrificing Baynes is more than understandable, but his absence should be felt.

The real question is, why exactly did Phoenix go out of its way to get him?

Al-Farouq Aminu/Moe Harkless – Portland Trail Blazers

The Trail Blazers lost a lot of players that helped them reach their first Conference Finals since 2000. Enes Kanter. Evan Turner. Seth Curry. Harkless and Aminu stand out the most among them because they’ve been with the team since 2015 – the year Portland lost LaMarcus Aldridge – and have been in the starting lineup for most of that time.

Losing continuity can really hurt. In Portland’s case, there’s more to this than just losing two players that they relied on. They didn’t replace what they can do. Both Harkless and Aminu are wings capable of playing power forward in a small-ball lineup. This summer, the Blazers added Kent Bazemore and Mario Hezonja and retained Rodney Hood.

Bazemore is a two/three tweener who’s barely played power forward. Hezonja has played some power forward, but he hasn’t really put it together. Hood played a fair amount of power forward in this year’s playoffs, but in the regular season, not so much. Most of the minutes he’s played are at small forward.

There is a gap there that one way or the other, Portland is going to have to fill. Neither Aminu nor Harkless are the best three-point shooters – Harkless’ three-ball somehow went to hell this season – but their defense will sorely be missed. Harkless has a Defensive Real Plus-Minus of 1.69 while Aminu had one of 1.46. While not the best, both finished in the top-20 in their respective positions.

With Jusuf Nurkic out for who knows how long, Portland definitely had to do something to fill that gap. Trading Harkless for Hassan Whiteside – in a contract year – was a move the Blazers had to make even if it’s just a stopgap.

Losing both continuity and versatility can definitely hurt when you’re trying to pounce on a tough, but wide-open Western Conference. If the Blazers want to go further than they did last year, they need to address this before the season starts.

Glue guys are important, but what they bring to the court can be replaceable in some cases. Fans should really keep an eye out on how buyout season goes because, with all the contracts that are set to expire this year, we could see a lot of talent on the open market six months from now.

The teams that lost these players have the privilege of waiting to see how they fare. Even if losing a role player doesn’t sting as much as losing an All-Star does, getting someone who can replace what he does can make all the difference between winning the championship and getting eliminated in the opening round in this day and age.

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NBA

How D’Angelo Russell Fits Within The Golden State System

After acquiring D’Angelo Russell in a sign-and-trade, Steve Kerr and the Golden State staff will look to maximize his talents in their offensive system. The final product may take some time, but there is a reason to believe that he could thrive in the new role, writes Quinn Davis.

Quinn Davis

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For the first time in four years, the Golden State Warriors will enter the campaign as underdogs to win the championship. After losing the 2019 NBA Finals to Toronto, Kevin Durant joined Brooklyn and will spend a season rehabbing his Achilles before chasing a championship with new teammate Kyrie Irving. During Game 6 against the Raptors, Klay Thompson landed awkwardly on a fastbreak layup attempt, tearing his ACL and leaving his status uncertain for the entire upcoming season.

The Warriors were able to marginally re-tool by turning Durant’s departure into a sign-and-trade with the Nets, receiving 2019 All-Star D’Angelo Russell, along with Shabazz Napier and Treveon Graham. Golden State also sent a protected 2020 first-round pick to Brooklyn as part of the deal, while Napier and Graham were flipped to Minnesota for cap purposes.

Of course, Russell is coming off his best season as a professional, having just led a feisty Brooklyn squad to the postseason with a barrage of pull-up three-pointers and nifty passing. He spent the season as the lead ball-handler for the Nets and was often asked to create shots for himself and others during his time on the court.

Now the young showstopper will need to coexist with Stephen Curry, a future Hall of Famer that happens to be a decent lead ball-handler in his own right. How head coach Steve Kerr fosters this relationship — and how Russell performs in the role — will be a major factor in the Warriors’ positioning come playoff time in the Western Conference. While it could take some patience, there is some reason for optimism in the Bay Area.

Since Kerr took over coaching duties in the 2014-15 season, the Warriors have been a bastion of ball movement. They led the NBA last season in both assists per game and assist percentage. Brooklyn, meanwhile, finished 21st and 18th in those respective categories.

When looking at just Russell, he was assisted on only 29 percent of his total shots, and just 53 percent of his three-pointers, putting him in the 91st and 96th percentile of those categories, per cleaningtheglass.com. Russell was liable to pull up from deep at any moment last season, one of the best among non-James Harden players at canning triples off the bounce.

Needless to say, Russell will not carry the same creative burden in Golden State. The gravity Curry creates, combined with the team affinity for passing, will lead to a plethora of catch-and-shoot opportunities — a skill in which the Ohio State product has shown proficiency on.

Per NBA.com, Russell hit a touch over 39 percent of his catch-and-shoot three-point attempts last season.  For comparison, Klay Thompson shot just over 40 percent on these attempts.

This is not to say Russell can stand in as a Thompson replica — that’s an impossible task. Thompson had almost double the volume on those attempts, while his lightning-quick release allows him to shoot in tight spaces and when coming off screens. The majority of his catch-and-shoot three-pointers came from a standstill position as teammates found him with the extra pass. What Russell can do is provide the spacing necessary for Curry to operate, plus drill open looks when given the opportunity.

While Russell cannot perfectly emulate one of the best shooters ever, the Warriors could utilize him in ways they weren’t able to with Thompson.

Russell’s largely-successful stint as the creative orchestrator in Brooklyn will afford him plenty of chances to run the show this season as well. Even better, Russell may find it easier to create with a two-time MVP attracting multiple sets of eyes out at the three-point arc. Unsurprisingly, Curry shot a blistering 44.6 percent on catch-and-shoot threes, so Russell should see a less-crowded paint when he penetrates toward another patented floater.

Additionally, there’s the interesting wrinkle of using Curry as a screener with Russell running the pick and roll. Curry is a great screener for a guard and the Warriors have thrived with him off-ball, a decision that often leads to — you guessed it — freer looks around the three-point line. In the past, Golden State opted for Curry setting on-ball screens, mostly with Durant as the ball-handler. Those scenarios watch Curry slip the screens and dart to the three-point line, always leaving defenses in scramble mode.

Russell could slot into this role now, offering the ball-handling ability and pull up threat that Durant possessed. Last season, the Warriors scored 1.40 points per possession when Curry was the screener in a pick and roll, per NBA.com. They only had 0.6 of these possessions per game, but that is an elite number, and something they could look to for a basket in a close game.  Kenny Atkinson, the Nets’ head coach, typically paired Russell with Spencer Dinwiddie and the fluid, intentionally confusing movement helped Brooklyn surprise the league over and over again.

It’s easy to picture Curry playing the role of Dinwiddie here, setting a screen for Russell to start the action, then relocating to the three-point line as Russell goes into a 1-5 pick and roll.

The Warriors are not only getting someone who could complement their stars, but also a player that could lead the offense when Curry is resting.  This is where Russell’s experience from this last season in Brooklyn will be most useful.

In 2018-19, the Warriors had a paltry 100.6 offensive rating with both Curry and Durant off the court, per cleaningtheglass.com. The backup point guard position was usually manned by Quinn Cook or Shaun Livingston. Both were serviceable, but not without their limitations. Cook operated as more of a floor spacer and was not asked to create for teammates, while the savvy Livingston moved the ball but mostly looked to score in the post. Russell will provide the combination of shooting and point guard skills to control the floor and bend defenses.

Per NBA.com, the Warriors ran the fewest pick and rolls in the league last season.  With Russell now in the fold, they could add some of that to their playbook for a little more offensive diversity. Russell showed a keen ability to manipulate a pick and roll last season and these clips show the type of playmaking he could bring to his new team.

Presumably, Kerr will want one of Curry or Russell on the court at all times, especially until Thompson returns. It’s also possible that Curry is asked to spend some time with the bench, with Russell and the remaining starters playing while the superstar rests. Either way, the staggering of their minutes will be an important puzzle for Kerr to solve this offseason.

There are still areas of concern for the Russell addition. While all signs point to easy offensive assimilation, it is not a foregone conclusion that Russell can slide into the role of secondary playmaker and floor spacer after a full, All-Star-worthy year as the lead dog. That said, Kerr has dealt with multiple stars every year and always passed with flying colors — on top of that, Curry is as selfless as they come. What might become a major concern for other teams may not even register as a speed bump for this Warriors franchise.

Still, there is also the other half of the game and Russell will not be able to replace what Thompson brought defensively. Although Draymond Green is a master at covering for teammates mistakes, a Curry-Russell backcourt could be problematic on that end. Even the impenetrable Green will struggle to plug every gap for this year’s iteration of the Warriors.

Notably, Russell did do a good job last season of not fouling, finishing in the 91st percentile in this category per cleaningtheglass.com. A 6-foot-10 wingspan allows him to contest well and swipe the ball from unsuspecting opponents.

If he can improve his off-ball instincts under the tutelage of the Golden State’ staff, and exert a little more energy on that end, he could mitigate some of those defensive concerns.

All in all, the positives easily outweigh any concerns here. Russell will bring extra playmaking to the Warriors that was sorely needed with the Durant departure, and he can also slide in next to Curry rather seamlessly.

There will be work to do for Kerr and his coaching tree, but his track record signifies that this could be a mutually beneficial relationship.  If Russell keeps evolving at his newest hurdle — and the Warriors have a healthy Klay Thompson come playoff time — the fight for supremacy in the conference could be hotter than ever.

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