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Is This Carmelo Anthony’s Swan Song?

Carmelo Anthony’s days of contributing for a winning team are done, but Matt John explains why he could make one last impactful stop before he calls it a career.

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Well, that didn’t take long.

After only 10 games into the season, the Houston Rockets appear to have had enough of Carmelo Anthony. This is preceded by an abysmal performance in which the former 10-time All-Star made just one of 11 shots – and misfires on six attempts from distance – in a blow-out loss at the hands of his previous team, the Oklahoma City Thunder.

Shortly after the game, word had it that Carmelo’s days as a Rocket may have been numbered. Though the Rockets denied that they were waiving him, recent reports say that those within organization believe that this is the end for him.

A few months back, this writer detailed how Houston was basically Carmelo’s last chance to prove he could be a contributor for a winning team. His impending release confirms a sad, but not all that shocking, reality: the 34-year-old is finished.

While his basic statistics in Houston were not dreadfully bad – 13.4 points and 5.4 rebounds are solid numbers – a closer look will reveal that Carmelo was not making things any better.

His scoring numbers come off of 40 percent shooting from the floor, including almost 33 percent from distance. That’s not great considering that he was added to improve the offense. It gets worse when you take a look at his on/off numbers. The Rockets were 11.1 points per 100 possessions worse with Carmelo on the floor, good for second-worst on the team behind Michael Carter-Williams.

Though it’s clear that Carmelo was not a good fit, he should not be made into the scapegoat because Houston’s problems as a team go well beyond just him. Their drop-off on both sides of the ball are a result of the resources they lack to surround James Harden and Chris Paul.

Getting back to Carmelo, with him going back on the market this early on in the season, many wonder where his next stop should be – if he has one at this point.

One possibility is going overseas, maybe to the Chinese Basketball Association, where Carmelo could become another Stephon Marbury-like icon. Another one is joining the Lakers, where he could join Banana Boat buddy LeBron James and be another one of the various boisterous personalities in that locker room. A third option would be to hang it up. Retire before he could potentially get ousted by another team.

This writer believes there is a fourth option for Carmelo, which would be the ideal one for him at this point.

While Carmelo can’t be a contributor anymore for a winner, there is still a place for him in the NBA. Primarily, what he would be brought in for at this point would be more for sentimental value than anything else. In this case, that would be returning to the New York Knicks.

Think of Carmelo’s situation to be similar to former teammate Allen Iverson’s back in 2009. After a briefly disastrous stint with the Memphis Grizzlies, Iverson shortly opted to return to his first team, the Philadelphia 76ers. Iverson was washed up, but Philadelphia wasn’t going anywhere – with or without him. Bringing him back gave the city some nostalgia for one of the franchise’s all-time greats, which made the season memorable,  even though “The Answer” only played in 25 games.

Carmelo didn’t start his career with the Knicks, nor did he spend nearly as much time or experience as much success with the Knicks as Iverson did with the Sixers. However, Carmelo spent a good chunk of his prime in the Big Apple and stuck through the thick and thin with the team. He may have had his problems with certain coaches and players over the years, but when he was at the top of his game, Carmelo loved being a New York Knickerbocker and wanted to do his best for the franchise.

With all the history he has in New York, Carmelo could end his career playing for the team he always felt an emotional attachment to. It would be a suitable send off for his career. Plus, he wouldn’t have to deal with Phil Jackson this time, he could play for a solid coach in David Fizdale and even be a mentor to some of the Knicks’ young talent. Carmelo wouldn’t be helping a winning team, but at least the veteran could do something worthwhile for the team he always wanted to leave his mark with.

For the Knicks, bringing in Carmelo wouldn’t do much to help the team win, but New York currently doesn’t have much to lose as it is. The team currently stands at 4-10, and no one knows exactly what the timetable is for Kristaps Porzingis’ return. Even with their bad record, the Knicks still have a feisty young team that is willing to compete with anyone despite the odds being against them. Bringing in Carmelo would bring back some good memories that would make them more appealing to watch. This season’s probably not going to be remembered for much anyway, so what’s the harm in bringing your last franchise player back for the nostalgia?

It’s true that Carmelo was on the Knicks as recently as a little over a year ago, and he requested a trade out of there. Remember, though, that Iverson similarly also requested a trade out of Philadelphia in 2006, and found himself back on the team just three years later after it was granted. In Carmelo’s case, perhaps both sides can let the past be the past so they can kiss and make up.

This, of course, is all just an idea. For all we know, Carmelo still believes that he can help someone who is legitimately trying to win. The man still has a reputation as a scorer in this league, warts and all. New York may also want to focus more on getting the kids more burn than bringing back a washed-up star who won them only one playoff series.

If New York’s not interested, then maybe his hometown Brooklyn could add him. If Carmelo wants both to win and go somewhere for nostalgia, then Denver would technically be an option. Considering that relationship didn’t end well and Denver appears comfortable with their team, that doesn’t appear likely.

Matt John is a staff writer for Basketball Insiders. He is currently a Utah resident, but a Massachusetts native.

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