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NBA PM: Who Most Needs A Trade?

We asked three of our Basketball Insiders to identify some players that really could use a trade.

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Who Most Needs A Trade?

In what is a weekly Thursday feature, we ask three of our Basketball Insiders to weigh in on common question. This week we asked “Who Most Needs A Trade?”

Carmelo Anthony

Carmelo Anthony has had a rough year. Not only did his boss openly make it known in the most brutal media market in professional sports that he no longer wanted Anthony on the Knicks, he also experienced minimal professional success from a team standpoint and saw embarrassing details of his marital struggles broadcast to the entire world. Any human being with the power to choose their place of employment would have long ago bolted for greener pastures, or even just an equally green pasture, if only for a fresh start.

That, of course, hasn’t happened just yet. Anthony could accept a trade to Portland if he wanted change just for the sake of change, but so far he hasn’t waived his no-trade clause to play with Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum, despite their overtures. He reportedly would waive it for Chris Paul and James Harden in Houston, however, forcing a trade with the just the one team is rather limiting, so thus far it simply hasn’t happened.

For now, Anthony is stuck where he is, playing for a team that hasn’t made the postseason since Marvin Bagley III was an 8th grader. In the past four years, New York never has won more than 37 games and has used their futility to draft Anthony’s heir as franchise cornerstone in Kristaps Porzingis. More recently, they have shown how serious they were about building something around Porzingis and Anthony by passing on Dennis Smith, Jr. in the most recent draft and paying Joakim Noah and Tim Hardaway, Jr. a combined $143 million.

It looks like the Knicks are going to move toward youth for yet another rebuild, and at 33 years old Anthony does not fit into that. If there wasn’t a no-trade clause, he would likely already be gone, but with only Houston as a trade partner he is stuck on a team where he serves no real purpose. Rather, it’s as if he’s serving time.

Anthony still can score 20+ points per game and would be a really fun fit with the Rockets, knocking down threes and spreading out what already should be an insanely entertaining offense, but he’s not a Houston Rocket yet. Rather, he’s rotting in the center of the Big Apple. His stubbornness will keep him there for now, but he hasn’t fit with the Knicks for years. Nobody’s more overdue for a change of scenery than him.

– Joel Brigham

Jahlil Okafor

Few feelings can top the feeling a young player has when they are drafted to their first NBA home. At the time, waves of happiness are followed by waves of excitement for accomplishing what would look to be a lifelong goal of playing in their sport’s highest league.

But for some, that honeymoon feeling can come to an abrupt end and the search for greener pastures replaces the once-new feelings of excitement.

For Jahlil Okafor, the latter has become the present.

Just two years ago, Okafor was selected third overall by the Philadelphia 76ers in the NBA Draft only a few months after winning a national championship with Duke during his lone collegiate season.

Okafor’s start with the Sixers was immediately met with turmoil. During his introductory press conference, a chopped video hit Twitter and displayed what had looked like a displeased Okafor dropping his new Sixers jersey on the table with no love. More or less just a result of good editing, it still left a bad taste in the mouths of Philly fans to start the big man’s stay in his new city.

While on the court during his rookie year, Okafor did his best to shine. Throughout the 53 games Okafor played during his first season, he averaged 17.5 points, seven rebounds, and shot over 50 percent from the field per game. Poor defense aside, Okafor was the first real scoring threat Philadelphia possessed since Allen Iverson was on the court.

Since then, however, things haven’t been so sunny in Philadelphia for the Chicago native.

As he enters his third season, Okafor finds himself sitting behind Joel Embiid — the franchise cornerstone — and his lack of versatility athletically limits his ability to the play power forward role (which is crowded in its own right between Dario Saric and potentially Ben Simmons).

Along with the fact that his place in the rotation in question, Okafor’s name has been involved in trade talks for nearly a year. During last season’s trade deadline, Okafor was informed by the team that they were looking for suitable trade partners. The process got so far along that Okafor even left the club during a road trip. The trade deadline ultimately saw Philadelphia move Nerlens Noel to the Dallas Mavericks, leaving Okafor stuck with the Sixers for the duration.

Although the Sixers have looked to move Okafor in the past, and will presumably keep their eyes open for any deals in the future, there has been talk of optimism around the team in regards to seeing what Okafor can do on the court when surrounded by actual playmakers like Simmons and 2017 first overall pick, Markelle Fultz.

Regardless of what impact Okafor may have with elevated talent around him, the traditional back-to-the-basket center doesn’t necessarily fit the mold of a Sixers team that will look to push the pace next season. Okafor’s ball stopping offensive game and defensive limitations make him a forced fit at best with Philadelphia’s current roster construct.

The writing’s on the wall for Okafor in Philadelphia, and while his future with the Sixers seems bleak he still does possess some attractive qualities to his game; most notably his ability to score at will in the post.

At this point, Okafor would best be suited in another uniform with a fresh start. Hopefully there he can restart his still very young NBA career.

– Dennis Chambers

Eric Bledsoe

The Phoenix Suns have a plan in place for their future.

Guys like Devin Booker, Marquese Chriss and first-round draft pick Josh Jackson are set to lead basketball in the desert into a new era. With the organization honing in on young talent to develop during its rebuild, it’s obvious Eric Bledsoe shouldn’t be a part of it anymore.

For the past couple of years, mostly last, Bledsoe’s name was brought up as a potential trade chip with the Suns nowhere near the playoff picture. As it stands today, he’s been rumored as a major piece the Cleveland Cavaliers would like in return for Kyrie Irving if a deal were to be worked out.

The interest is high, as it should be. Entering his eighth season as a pro, Bledsoe has proven to be one of the most dynamic point guards in the NBA. It hasn’t quite resulted in an All-Star appearance for him yet, but the production is clearly there.

In the past four seasons combined, Bledsoe has averaged over 18 points, six assists and four rebounds on over 44 percent from the field. He’s one of five players in the league to have done so and is among elite company—Stephen Curry, James Harden, Chris Paul and LeBron James to be specific.

Of course, the knock on the 27-year-old is trouble staying on the floor, which could definitely affect his value as a core piece of a move. He’s dealt with knee injuries multiple times and missed a month of action last year because of soreness there. The concern is very real regarding if he’ll be able to handle the rigors of a full season consistently.

With that being said, if Bledsoe is attacking with the same aggressiveness as he was pre-surgery and putting forth those kinds of numbers while hurt, imagine what can he do with no restrictions? That’s where the intrigue remains. He’s got a 6-1, 205-pound frame, but plays like he’s seven inches taller and 35 pounds heavier.

The fearless attitude is what makes Bledsoe, Bledsoe. His all-around game is spectacular. That’s why Phoenix paid him a $70 million contract over five years in 2014. He was supposed to pair up with Brandon Knight and create a foundation for seasons to come, but that ship sailed two seasons ago. There’s just a new direction altogether.

Coming into the 2017-18 campaign, Bledsoe is about to hit the prime of his career. For both parties, it’d be mutually beneficial to go separate ways. On one hand, the Suns could finally hand the reigns over to the next faces of their franchise and see what they can really do when given a better opportunity.

On the other, Bledsoe could go to a contending spotlight and show what he’s really made of on a bigger, brighter stage.

– Spencer Davies

Every Thursday we’ll ask three of our guys to chime in on a common subject. If there is something you would like to see us address, drop it to us on Twitter at @BBallInsiders using the hashtag #ConversationThursday.

More Twitter: Make sure you are following all of our guys on Twitter to ensure you are getting the very latest from our team: @stevekylerNBA, @MikeAScotto, @LangGreene, @EricPincus, @joelbrigham, @TommyBeer, @MokeHamilton, @jblancartenba, @Ben_Dowsett, @CodyTaylorNBA, @SpinDavies, @BuddyGrizzard, @JamesB_NBA, @DennisChambers, and @Ben__Nadeau .

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