Connect with us

NBA

Ranking the 70 Greatest Knicks of All-Time (Part 2)

To commemorate the Knicks’ 70th anniversary, Tommy Beer, in a two-part series, ranks the 70 greatest Knicks.

Tommy Beer

Published

on

Earlier this week, Basketball Insiders released the first installment of a two-part series ranking the 70 greatest New York Knicks of all time to commemorate the franchises’ 70th season, which you can read here.

Now, Tommy Beer ranks the remainder, from #34 all the way down to #1:

34. Johnny Green
Green spent his early 20s in the Marine Corp and was 26 when the Knicks selected him fifth overall in 1959 draft. He became a full-time starter in 1961-62 and averaged 15.9 points and 13.3 rebounds. He bumped those averages up to 18.1 and 12.1 the following year. He was named to the All-Star team both seasons. In February 1962, he set a Knicks team record by grabbing at least 20 rebounds in three consecutive games. Walt Bellamy, Willis Reed and Tyson Chandler are the only other Knicks to have matched that streak.

33. Ray Williams
The Knicks selected Williams with the 10th overall selection in 1977. He struggled as a rookie, but then averaged at least 17 points and five dimes per game for each of his next three seasons. His best season with the Knicks was his third, when he averaged 20.9 ppg, 6.2 apg and 5.0 rpg in 1979-80.

32. Stephon Marbury
When the Knicks traded for Marbury in 2004, it seemed like a dream scenario for both the point guard from Brooklyn and his hometown team. Unfortunately, there were up and downs in the marriage, before it ended in an ugly divorce. Marbury posted solid numbers during his time in New York, with a cumulative average of 18.5 points and 7.1 assists. The Knicks also qualified for the postseason in 2003-04 (the only time they did so from 2002 through 2012), although they were quickly swept by the Nets. However, all the drama and bad basketball played during Marbury’s time in New York make it difficult to look back with much fondness.

31. Amar’e Stoudemire
“The Knicks are Back!” That’s what Amar’e boldly proclaimed for all the world to hear on the day he signed with New York. And for a few months, it looked like he was prophetic. Stoudemire started off his Knicks career with a bang, averaging 29.8 points and 9.7 rebounds per game in December of 2011. He set a franchise record by scoring at least 30 points in nine straight games that month. MVP chants rang out inside the Garden. He was named a starter in the All-Star game, the first Knick since Ewing to achieve that honor. Then, in February, the Knicks made the trade with Denver to bring Carmelo Anthony aboard. Predictably, STAT and Melo never meshed on the court. And, also predictably, Stoudemire’s knee began to betray him. He appeared in just 47 games in 2011-12 and then played just 29 games off the bench in 2012-13.

30. Tyson Chandler
Chandler had trouble staying healthy during his three seasons in New York, but he dominated the paint when he did suit up. He was phenomenal during his first season as a Knick in 2011-12. Chandler was incredibly efficient on the offensive end of the floor, shooting a league-leading 67.9 percent from the floor. At the time, Wilt Chamberlain was the only player in league history who had posted a higher FG percentage. Tyson remains the Knicks all-time leader in field goal percentage (63.8). No other qualified player is above 56 percent. However, Chandler was far more valuable on the defensive end. He spearheaded a revived Knicks defense and ended up winning the Defensive Player of the Year award in 2011-12. He is the only Knick ever named DPOY. In June of 2014, in his first major move as Knicks GM, Phil Jackson traded Chandler and Raymond Felton to the Mavs in exchange for a package centered around Jose Calderon.

29. Marcus Camby
The highpoint of Camby’s Knicks tenure was the improbable run to the NBA Finals in 1999. When Patrick Ewing went down with an Achilles injury in the Eastern Conference Finals, Camby stepped in and stepped up. He averaged 14.3 points, 10.2 rebounds, three blocks and 2.2 steals over the course of that six-game series. Larry Bird called Camby the MVP of the ECF. The Camby Man also posted a Defensive Box Plus/Minus of 4.1 in 2000-01, the highest single-season mark in Knicks history. Camby was traded to the Nuggets in exchange for Antonio McDyess on Draft Day in 2002.

28. Nathaniel Clifton
Sweetwater was not merely a significant contributor on the court for the Knicks; he also made a tremendous impact off the floor as well. Drafted by New York in 1950, Clifton became the first African-American player to sign a contract with an NBA team. He was 27 years old at the time, having played for the New York Rens and the Harlem Globetrotters in his early 20s. He also played for the Chicago American Giants in Negro League baseball. The Knicks advanced to the NBA Finals in each of his first three seasons in New York. He averaged 10.3 points and 8.5 boards over his seven-year Knicks career.

27. Kurt Thomas
Kurt’s claim to fame, other than the “Krazy Eyes” look he gave to officials after a questionable call, was leading the nation in both scoring (28.9 ppg) and rebounding (14.6 rpg) during his senior year at TCU. For five straight seasons with the Knicks – from 2000-01 to 2004-05 – Thomas averaged over 10 points per game. He averaged a career-best 14 points – along with 7.9 rebounds – in 2002-03. During the 2004-05 season, he averaged a double-double (11.5 points and 10.4 rebounds). He ranks third all-time in franchise history in defensive rebounds and fourth in blocks.

26. Walt Bellamy
Bellamy’s career numbers are undeniably impressive. He is one of just nine players in NBA history to tally more than 20,000 points and more than 14,000 rebounds in his career. The others are Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Elvin Hayes, Robert Parish, Moses Malone, Karl Malone, Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett. In four seasons with the Knicks, Bellamy averaged a double-double with 18.9 points and 13.3 rebounds per game. He also holds a unique NBA record: Most regular-season games played in one season (88), thanks to the midseason trade that brought Dave DeBusschere to the Knicks.

25. Larry Johnson
By the time LJ arrived in New York (via a swap for Anthony Mason in July of 1996), he was no longer the high-flying dunk machine that starred at UNLV and won the Rookie of the Year in Charlotte. A back injury robbed Johnson of his athleticism and forced him to reinvent himself. LJ did just that, developing a stellar low-post game and a reliable jumper. He never averaged more than 15.5 points or six rebounds per game during his Knicks career, but he was a steady, reliable force on both ends of the floor. And, of course, his four-point play against the Pacers in the 1999 Eastern Conference Finals will never be forgotten by any Knick fan that witnessed it.

24. Willie Naulls
Naulls put up incredible numbers during his Knicks tenure. During three seasons in the heart of his prime, 1959 through 1962, Naulls averaged 23.3 points and 13 rebounds per game. For his Knicks career, he averaged 19.3 points and 11.1 boards. He was named to the All-Star team four times. His scoring average of 19.3 is the fifth highest in Knicks history. While with the Knicks, Naulls was also the first African-American player to be named the captain of a major professional sports team.

23. Jerry Lucas
Lucas was a terrific player in his prime. He won Rookie of the Year in 1964 and was named MVP of the All-Star Game the following year. Lucas made the All-Star Team in six straight seasons, from 1964 through 1969, and then again in 1971. By the time he arrived in New York, he was at the tail end of his career. He played only three seasons for the Knicks, his final three seasons in the NBA. He averaged 16.7 points, 13.1 rebounds and 4.1 assists during that first season (1971-72) with the Knicks. To this day, he remains the only player in franchise history to average double-digit points and double-digit rebounds while also averaging more than four assists per game over the course of a full season. In addition, over 16 playoff games that year, Lucas averaged 18.6 points, 10.8 boards and 5.3 assists, playing 46.1 minutes per contest. The following season Lucas played far fewer minutes and had less of an impact, but he was still a valued contributor on the 1973 title team. When he won that ring with the Knicks, he became the first man to win a championship in high school, college, the Olympics and the NBA.

22. Bob McAdoo
McAdoo only played a total of 171 games as a Knick over parts of three seasons; however, he packed plenty of points and rebounds into that short period of time. In 1976-77, he averaged 26.7 points and 12.7 rebounds. The following year he averaged 26.5 points and 12.8 boards per contest. Those are the only two times any Knick has averaged at least 26 points and 12 rebounds in the same season. In addition, McAdoo has the highest career scoring average as a Knick in franchise history (26.7 ppg), barely edging out Bernard King (26.5 ppg). McAdoo is also the team’s all-time leader in minutes per game (39.8).

21. Anthony Mason
Much like Oakley, the late, great Mase was the personification of the rugged 90s Knicks. He was a kid from Queens who attended tiny Tennessee Valley State. Mason bounced around the NBA and the minor leagues for a bit before latching on the with the Knicks in 1991. For the next five years, he captured the heart of the city by putting everything he had on the line every time stepped on the floor. He was a vital contributor on teams that went deep into the postseason every year. Belying his burly appearance and aggressive attitude, Mase had a soft touch around the basket and an incredibly high basketball IQ. In many respects, he was the predecessor to the modern-day “point forward.” He was named the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year in 1994-95 and led the NBA in minutes played in 1995-96.

20. Bill Cartwright
Remembered mostly as the starting center on the hated Bulls team’s of the early 1990s, Cartwright’s career got off to a great start in New York. He averaged 21.7 points and 8.9 rebounds as a rookie in 1979-80. In the process, he became the only Knick in franchise history to average over 20 points per contest as a rookie. Cartwright also cracked the 20-point plateau his second season. A debilitating foot injury cost him the better part of two seasons in the mid-80s and he was eventually traded to Chicago for Charles Oakley in June of 1988. Cartwright ranks second in blocks on the team’s all-time list and was in top-10 in scoring until Melo knocked him out earlier this year.

19. Latrell Sprewell
The Knicks were able to get the incredibly talented Sprewell at a steep discount (Terry Cummings, Chris Mills and an aging John Starks) in January of 1999 due to his infamous confrontation with Golden State coach P. J. Carlesimo. He played 37 games for the Knicks that first season in New York, coming off the bench in 33 of them. However, he played superbly in the postseason, sparking the eighth-seeded Knicks all the way to the NBA Finals. The Spurs knocked out the Knicks in five games, but Sprewell averaged 26 points per contest. He had 35 points and 10 boards in Game 5, the last time in which New York participated in a Finals game. He averaged 17.9 points over his five seasons a Knickerbocker.

18. Mark Jackson
Action Jackson was born in Brooklyn and played collegiately in Queens at St. John’s University. Thus, Knicks fans knew what they were getting and were ecstatic when New York snagged him with the 18th pick in the 1987 draft. His chemistry with Ewing was immediate. Jackson was named the NBA’s Rookie of the Year in 1987-88. His assist per game average (8.0) is the highest in franchise history. He also ranks sixth in steals.

17. Micheal Ray Richardson
In terms of pure talent, athleticism and basketball ability, very few rate higher than Richardson. The Knicks selected Sugar Ray fourth overall in the 1978 NBA draft (two spots ahead of Larry Bird), and Richardson lived up to the hype early on. In 1979-80, Richardson led the NBA in assists (10.1) and steals (3.2) while scoring 15.3 points per game. He would earn All-Defensive First Team honors in two of his first three years in the league. Richardson recorded 18 triple-doubles as a Knick, the second most in franchise history. He still ranks second All-Time in NBA history in steals per game (2.63 spg). Sadly, in 1986, Richardson was banned for life by NBA commissioner David Stern for violations of the league’s drug policy.

16. Dick Barnett
Barnett arrived in New York in October of 1965, via a trade that sent forward Bob Boozer to the Lakers. Barnett averaged 23.1 points per game that first season as a Knick, which was his career-high, and was named to the All-Star team that year. He averaged at least 12 points per game in each of his first 12 seasons. Although he was 33 years old by 1970, Barnett was a key contributor on New York’s first title team. Starting in the backcourt beside Frazier, Barnett averaged 14.9 points per game in the regular season and bumped that up 16.9 points in the playoffs. He scored 21 points in Game 7 vs. the Lakers. Barnett remained the Knicks starting shooting guard until they acquired Earl Monroe.

15. Carl Braun
Braun began his Knicks career in 1947 and didn’t play his final game in orange and blue until 1961. He appeared in 740 games for the Knicks, which is fourth all-time in franchise history. Only Ewing, Walt Frazier and Bill Bradley stand ahead of him. He scored 10,449 points as a Knick, which ranks fifth all-time, behind only the big three (Ewing, Frazier, Reed) and Allan Houston. Braun led the team in scoring during his first seven seasons and was a five-time All-Star. It is also important to note that he missed two years of his prime (1950 through 1952) to serve in the United States Army.

14. Dick McGuire
McGuire is in the conversation for greatest Knicks point guard not named Walt Frazier. McGuire played eight seasons in New York and was named to the All-Star game five times. In 1949-50, he dished out a then-NBA record 386 assists, which stood as team’s highest total by a rookie for nearly four decades, until Mark Jackson came along. He led New York to three straight NBA Finals (1951-52-53). His Knicks No. 15 was formally retired on Mar. 14, 1992.

13. John Starks
Starks is still a cult hero in NYC, the result of playing with an unmatched fire and passion that Knicks fans loved. The undrafted kid out of Tulsa, Oklahoma who was bagging groceries a few months before securing an NBA contract, also developed himself into a superb NBA player. During his outstanding eight-year career with the Knicks, Starks was named to the NBA All-Defensive Second Team in 1992-1993, became an NBA All-Star in 1994, and was awarded the League’s Sixth Man of the Year in 1996-1997. He averaged 14.1 points per game and remains 11th in total points (8,489), eighth in assists (2,394), seventh in steals (711) and first in made three-pointers (982) in Knicks history. Starks is also fourth all-time in postseason points. Oh, and this one time he dunked on Horace Grant (and MJ) and every teenage Knicks fan in the 1990s had a poster of “The Dunk” on their wall.

12. Carmelo Anthony
Ranking Melo is difficult, as he is a better player than some of the names listed above him; however, he has played a majority of his career in Denver (564 career games as a Nugget vs. 404 games as a Knick). Also, he enjoyed his greatest team success and playoff performances as a Nugget. Denver qualified for the postseason in each of his seven seasons, whereas the Knicks have failed to qualify for the playoffs for four straight years. Nonetheless, Anthony has authored some remarkable performances in his relatively short time in a Knicks uniform. He poured in a franchise record 62 points back on January 24th, 2014 in a win over the Bobcats at MSG. In addition, he led the 2012-13 Knicks to 54-regular season wins and helped New York advance past the first round of the playoffs for the first (and only) time this century. In the years since, he’s been the lone bright spot on some bad teams, giving fans a reason to pay attention to a poor product.

11. Charles Oakley
His numbers don’t jump out at you, and his stats won’t compare to many others on this list, but Oakley is one of those players whose true value was never measured by statistics alone. Oak was truly beloved by Knicks fans in the 1990’s due to his blue-collar work ethic and tenacious effort on a nightly basis. Hard-nosed defense and rebounding were Oakley’s calling cards. He ranks 10th all-time in NBA history in offensive rebounds, one spot behind Hakeem Olajuwon and one spot ahead of Tim Duncan. In 1994, he became an NBA All-Star and was named to the league’s All-Defensive First Team.

10. Earl Monroe
Monroe enjoyed his greatest individual success as a member of the Baltimore Bullets. He averaged 23.7 ppg for Baltimore over the first four years if his career. Then, on Nov. 10, 1971, the Knicks traded Mike Riordan, Dave Stallworth and cash to obtain Monroe. Pearl adjusted his game to fit in alongside Clyde once he arrived in NYC. Monroe averaged just 20.6 minutes per game that first season in New York (due partly to nagging knee injuries) and scored only 11.4 ppg. He averaged 15.5 points for the Knicks second championship team in 1972-73. He later averaged over 20 ppg in 1974-75 and 1975-76.

9. Allan Houston
Houston will forever have a special place in the hearts of Knicks fans because he drove a stake through the heart of Pat Riley on May 16, 1999. With time winding down in the deciding Game 5 of the Knicks-Heat first-round playoff series, Houston curled off a screen, caught the pass and took a couple of dribbles before releasing a running one-hander from 16-feet. The ball danced on the front of the rim and bounced off the backboard before falling through the net with 0.8 seconds left on the clock. New York became just the second eight seed in NBA history to knock off a number one. That Knicks team would eventually advance all the way to the Finals, which is the last time the ‘Bockers have scaled those heights. Houston went to back-to-back All-Star games in 2000 and 2001 and is among Knicks’ all-time greats in several offensive categories. Houston is fourth on the all-time Knicks career scoring list, trailing only Ewing, Frazier and Reed. He is also second in three-point field goals and third in free throw percentage (.872).

8. Bill Bradley
Bradley is one of the most unique players in basketball history, let alone Knicks annals. He is a NBA Hall-of-Famer, an All-Star, and All-American; he was also a Senator and a Rhodes Scholar. Bradley was the prototypical “glue guy” on the Knicks title teams in the early 70s. He had his best season in 1972-1973, when he played in all 82 games and averaged career-highs in points (16.1) and assists (4.5), while also chipping in 3.7 rebounds. He ranks 10th in points, sixth in assists and third in games played on the Knicks all-time list.

7. Harry Gallatin
Harry “The Horse” was one of the NBA’s best rebounders during the 1950s. Although he was undersized at just 6-foot-6, he averaged double-digit rebounds each season from 1950 through 1958. Gallatin led the NBA in boards in 1953-54, pulling down 15.3 rebounds per game. He grabbed 33 rebounds in one game in 1953, a Knicks record that still stands. Gallatin was also incredibly durable. He played in 610 consecutive regular-season games and 57 postseason contests. He was named an All-Star in seven consecutive seasons, from 1950-51 through 1956-57.

6. Bernard King
King was a genuine shooting star, and if it weren’t for debilitating injuries, who knows how high he’d rank on this list. When healthy in his prime, King was arguably the most talented player in franchise history. His career scoring average (26.5) is the second highest amongst all Knicks. On January 31st and February 1st in 1984, King posted back-to-back 50-point outings against the San Antonio Spurs and the Dallas Mavericks. He was unstoppable in the playoffs that season as well, willing New York to a first-round series victory over the Pistons. King averaged a mind-boggling 42.6 points per game in that series while shooting 60.4 percent from the floor. The following season (1984-85), he led the NBA in scoring with an average of 32.9 ppg.

5. Richie Guerin
The team was often not very good during Guerin’s tenure with the Knicks, making the playoffs just once, but Guerin was great. He is one of only two Knicks in franchise history to average over 29 points per game for a full season, averaging 29.5 points in 1961-62. But Guerin wasn’t just a scorer. In that aforementioned 1961-62 campaign, he also averaged 6.4 rebounds and 6.9 assists. Per BasketballReference.com, Guerin is one of only four players in NBA history to average at least 29.5 points, 6.5 assists and six rebounds over the course of a full season. The other three players in that elite club are Oscar Robertson, Michael Jordan and LeBron James. During his prime, from 1957-58 through 1961-62, Guerin averaged 7.2 rebounds and six assists per game. His individual game career-highs of 57 points and 21 assists stood as franchise records for more than 50 years.

4. Dave DeBusschere
On December 19, 1968, the New York Knicks traded center Walt Bellamy and guard Howard Komives to the Pistons for Dave DeBusschere. It’s the single greatest trade the Knicks ever engineered. A gritty, underrated star on New York’s two title teams, DeBusschere was the final piece of the championship puzzle. His resume is incredibly impressive. He was named to the NBA All-Defensive First Team in each of the award’s first six years of existence. (Remarkably, at least two Knicks were named to the NBA’s All-Defense First Team each season from 1968-69 thru 1973-74.) DeBusschere made eight All-Star games, was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1983 and was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History.

3. Willis Reed
Reed’s incredible career was somewhat limited due to injuries. He played only ten NBA seasons (all with the Knicks) and played more than 69 games only seven times. Nonetheless, he was incredibly dominant in his prime. He is also the author of some of the greatest moments in franchise history; none more memorable than him limping out of the tunnel in the old MSG at approximately 7:34 pm on May 8th, 1970, fifteen minutes before the start of Game 7. Reed wasn’t as flashy as Clyde, but he was the heart-and-soul of those championships teams. “The Captain” was selected Finals MVP both years the Knicks captured the crown. He was also the NBA’s Rookie of the Year in 1964-65 and Most Valuable Player in 1969-70.

2. Walt “Clyde” Frazier
Willis Reed scored the first four points in the Knicks epic Game 7 victory over the Lakers in the 1970 NBA Finals, but Frazier did just about everything else that night. He poured in 36 points, dished out 19 assists, grabbed seven rebounds and recorded five steals. Read that last sentence again. Walt Frazier did all that in the single most important game in New York basketball history. Clyde is a living legend in the truest sense of the word. He’s the franchise’s all-time leader in assists. He was named to the NBA All-Defense First Team seven consecutive times. Not only did he average over 20 points per game six times in his career, but he was also an excellent rebounder for a guard, averaging at least six rebounds per game in six straight seasons. Over a six-year stretch, from 1970 through 1976, Clyde averaged 21.5 points, 6.6 rebounds and 6.6 assists per contest.

1. Patrick Ewing
First, let’s start with the stats. Ewing is the all-time franchise leader in points (having scored 9,048 more career points than Frazier, who sits in second), rebounds (Patrick grabbed 2,345 more career boards than Willis Reed), blocks and steals. And, yeah, Patrick never won a ring, but he put the Knicks on his back and carried them deep into the postseason with a subpar supporting cast year after year after year. He never quite reached the mountaintop, but is it fair to place the blame squarely on his shoulders? There are only three genuine contenders for the title of “The Greatest Knick of All Time.” Ewing, Frazier and Reed. The reason Patrick gets the top spot here is because he did the most with the least. Consider this: There were six (yes, SIX) Hall-of-Famers on Willis and Clyde’s legendary championship teams. In 1969-70, three of the Knicks five starters (Reed, Frazier and DeBusschere) each made the NBA All-Defensive First-Team. The 1972-73 Knicks had five players that were eventually named among the NBA’s “50 Greatest Players.” In contrast, Ewing never played alongside a teammate that made more than one All-Star team! Think about that for a second. Patrick Ewing is quite possibly the most underappreciated superstar in the history of New York sports, and the greatest Knick that ever lived.

Tommy Beer is a Senior NBA Analyst and the Fantasy Sports Editor of Basketball Insiders, having covered the NBA for the last nine seasons.

Advertisement




Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

NBA

NBA Daily: Grading The Offseason – Chicago Bulls

David Yapkowitz continues Basketball Insiders’ “Grading The Offseason” series by taking a look at the Chicago Bulls.

David Yapkowitz

Published

on

With summer league over and the big name free agents all signed, we’re now approaching the doldrums of the NBA offseason. Most big moves have all been made, and we shouldn’t expect to too much movement between now and the start of training camp.

Most teams probably have an idea already of what the bulk of their roster will look like come training camp, and as such, we’re starting a new series here at Basketball Insiders taking a look at each team’s offseason to this point.

Next up in our series is the Chicago Bulls.

Overview

The Bulls are a team clearly in rebuilding mode. After this offseason, they’ve done a pretty solid job at filling out the roster with young talent at every position. It’s obvious now that they were clear winners of their trade with the Minnesota Timberwolves two years ago that netted them Zach LaVine, Lauri Markkanen and Kris Dunn.

LaVine continued his ascent to stardom this past season. There may have been initial concerns when he was traded to Chicago as to how he would respond after his torn ACL, but since then, he’s showed no lingering limitations. He’s well on his way to becoming one of the elite shooting guards in the league. Few can match his scoring prowess whether he’s slashing to the rim or shooting 37.4 percent from the three-point line.

Markkanen has emerged as one of the top young big men in the NBA. He made some strong steps forward in his second year in the league. He’s moving closer to becoming a double-double threat every night. He’s exceeded projections from when he was drafted that pegged him as little more than a three-point shooting big. He has shown a lot more versatility to his game.

One major addition the Bulls made last season was the trade deadline acquisition of Otto Porter Jr. When he arrived in Chicago, he quickly played some of the best basketball of his career, fitting in seamlessly with the team and solidifying himself as part of their future core.

They’ve also got Wendell Carter Jr. in the fold. Their top draft pick last offseason, Carter quickly established himself a great defensive complement to Markkanen. An injury cut his rookie season shorter than expected, but he still showed flashes of being a capable around the rim scorer.

They do have some other decent rotation guys in Antonio Blakeney, Chandler Hutchinson and Ryan Arcidiacono. Blakeney is an instant offense scoring guard for the second unit, and Hutchinson was showing flashes of his talent before he too went down with an injury during his rookie season. Arcidiacono was re-signed by the Bulls after being one of their most consistent outside shooters last season.

Offseason

The Bulls came into draft night with the seventh overall pick. It might have seemed like a disappointment seeing as how the Bulls probably had a shot at a top three pick considering their record. But ultimately, Chicago might have gotten what it wanted in the end. Point guard has been an area of need for the Bulls for quite some time, and they used their pick on North Carolina’s Coby White.

White is a little more in the mold of a scoring guard, but if you could take away one thing from his performance in summer league, it’s that he can thrive as a playmaker as well. It’s unlikely that White will get to start right away, but he’s got the makings of developing into the Bulls eventual starter at the point.

Chicago also picked up Daniel Gafford in the second round. The Bulls needed frontcourt depth after losing Robin Lopez in free agency, and they may very well have found their answer with Gafford. Summer League isn’t always a great indicator of how a player will translate to the NBA, but Gafford was solid as a finisher around the rim and a shot blocker in the paint. He may end up becoming one of the steals of the draft.

In free agency, the Bulls made some rather solid moves. On a team full of young players, it’s necessary to have a couple of key veterans for the young guys to lean on and to provide leadership and stability in the locker room. Thaddeus Young certainly fits that bill. Entering his 13th year in the league, Young played in 81 games last season and was a key guy on a Pacers team that made the playoffs. He’ll provide the Bulls with consistency on and off the court.

They also made a big step to addressing their point guard woes. They acquired Tomas Satoransky in a sign and trade with the Washington Wizards. He’ll provide a perfect stop-gap as the starting point guard while White develops. He proved himself as a facilitator with the Wizards, and he’s one of the better three-point shooters in the league, He’s a versatile guy who can play and defend multiple positions.

The Bulls also picked up Luke Kornet who spent last season with the New York Knicks. Kornet is relatively young and gives the Bulls a solid stretch big man on a decent contract. He’s also a solid shot blocker and should compete with Gafford for minutes off the bench.

Chicago also picked up an intriguing prospect in Adam Mokoka. The French combo guard initially declared for the draft a year ago but ultimately withdrew. He re-entered the draft this summer but went undrafted. In summer league, he showed flashes of playing both wing positions and being a capable defender who can shoot from three. He’ll be on a two-way contract so he’ll see significant time with the Windy City Bulls, Chicago’s G League affiliate.

PLAYERS IN: Adam Mokoka (two-way), Coby White, Daniel Gafford, Luke Kornet, Thaddeus Young, Tomas Satoransky

PLAYERS OUT: Brandon Sampson, Rawle Alkins, Robin Lopez, Shaquille Harrison, Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot, Walt Lemon Jr., Wayne Selden

What’s Next

The Bulls roster currently stands at 15 guaranteed contracts and one two-way contract. They’re likely done with any roster additions unless they find someone to take that second two-way contract slot. They’d most likely move Cristiano Felicio if they could find a taker for his contract, but it’s probably unlikely.

With the additions of Satoransky and White, that likely spells the end of the Kris Dunn experiment in Chicago. If Dunn remains on the roster through the season, and the Bulls aren’t able to move him, it’s highly unlikely Chicago tenders him a qualifying offer. In all likelihood, this is his final season in the Windy City.

The Bulls have done a decent job at filling the roster out with good, young talent. Making the playoffs, even in the Eastern Conference, is still likely a few seasons away. But there is reason for optimism for the Bulls future.

OFFSEASON GRADE: B

Continue Reading

NBA

NBA Daily: Grading The Offseason – Cleveland Cavaliers

Spencer Davies opens Basketball Insiders team-by-team “Grading The Offseason” series with an overview of the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Spencer Davies

Published

on

On Monday night in Las Vegas, the 2019 NBA Summer League champions will be crowned. The Minnesota Timberwolves and Memphis Grizzlies are set to square off at the Thomas & Mack Center as the last teams standing over the course of the 10-day period.

Once that winner is determined, the world will be without NBA basketball for quite some time. Though the FIBA World Cup will be fun to watch, it’s not until late September that the association returns for training camp.

In order to hold you over until that date, Basketball Insiders has begun a “Grading The Offseason” series, featuring in-depth analysis on how each franchise has done during this wild summer.

To start things off, we’re going to break down arguably the quietest team of them all regarding roster turnover—the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Overview

It’s no secret that, on the floor, the season didn’t go quite as expected. Following the second departure of LeBron James, the organization felt it had enough remnants of the conference championship team to move forward and compete while developing young talent under head coach Tyronn Lue. A detrimental injury to Kevin Love changed that quickly.

Lue was fired six games into the 2018-19 campaign and then the wheels fell off pretty quickly. Top assistant Larry Drew pushed for a raise to take the interim role, due to the mixed bag inside of the locker room, and he was granted one. But as the losses piled up, the internal battle between the veterans and the younger players grew. Most of the criticism shaded toward upstart rookie Collin Sexton, yet he later proved what he was capable of to some of those teammates later down the road.

There were bright spots when Love re-entered the picture around February and played until late March, as he helped steer the inexperienced youngsters like Sexton, Cedi Osman and Ante Zizic in the direction of winning basketball. When all was said and done, the final record was ugly. However, the energy surrounding the group was clearly in a much more positive light than it had been beforehand.

What shouldn’t be lost in the shuffle is the job Cavaliers’ general manager Koby Altman and his staff did to revamp the team’s salary cap situation. Entering the year with inflated contracts, via veterans that didn’t want to sit through a rebuild, moves had to be made to tighten up the locker room and lower the cap a significant amount. Ultimately, they were successful in doing so.

Cleveland was able to move Kyle Korver, George Hill, Sam Dekker, Rodney Hood and Alec Burks (acquired in the Korver trade) and turned that into Brandon Knight, Matthew Dellavedova, John Henson, Nik Stauskas and a boatload of future draft picks. Altman’s been in asset accumulation mode since he took over during LeBron’s last season, and he’s done wonders with the opportunity to chop down those loud figures on the cap sheet, even adding future capital in the process.

Not only has Altman done a great job in obtaining that, but he’s also turned “good” into “great” often—i.e. turning Korver into Burks which he then flipped for a 2019 first-round pick, using the second-rounders to acquire another first-round pick. Even landing Larry Nance Jr. and Jordan Clarkson at the 2018 trade deadline to kickstart a new direction was impressive.

Offseason

After parting ways with Drew at season’s end, the Cavaliers set a new course with the hiring of John Beilein in mid-May. Over the span of these past few months, he’s constructed a fresh coaching staff with former Memphis Grizzlies head coach J.B. Bickerstaff as his associate, University of California women’s head coach Lindsay Gottlieb and five-year Utah Jazz assistant Antonio Lang in complementary roles.

Beilein’s graduate assistant at Michigan, Jay Shunnar, is also a part of the staff. Team favorites Mike Gerrity and Dan Geriot are staying on as well to continue developing the players they’ve worked with.

All in all, the people assembled to take on this task of changing a culture are entrenched in teaching and doing hands-on work. It’s the on-court product with an extremely inexperienced group of coaches—three of which are coming from the collegiate level—that could be a challenge.  Luckily, the process seems to be about a collective group with an open-mindedness that won’t allow for egos to get in the way.

Despite the lottery results going south (Cleveland had the second-best odds in the top three and dropped to five), draft night was a smashing success for the organization. The wine and gold came out with a trio of highly touted rookies—Darius Garland, Dylan Windler and, after trades were officially cleared, Kevin Porter Jr. Adding talents to the roster was the top priority for the front office — today, that stands as the most noise from what’s been a mostly silent offseason.

With a lack of roster spots and an understanding that there would be little money to spend in a chaotic, competitive free-agent market, the Cavaliers have had to stand pat with what they have. JR Smith’s contract had reportedly fielded some offers between NBA Draft Combine time and around the draft, but the team didn’t like the idea of taking back a bad contract. Instead, they found an easier way to get a third pick in the 2019 first round by using the plethora of second-rounders acquired in the past to flip for Porter.

Chris Fedor of Cleveland.com reported Monday that Cleveland plans on waiving and stretching Smith’s contract for $1.4 million each over the next three years. The move will allow the team to stay under the luxury tax, avoid the repeater tax penalty and also provides a full mid-level exception amount at its disposal. Fedor does mention the front office won’t likely use it heading into the season to remain flexible financially and to keep a roster spot open.

Smith not being traded came as a surprise to many, especially knowing the salary relief his previously-grandfathered CBA deal offered to a team searching to clear space for a big free agency offer. The summer moved fast, though, and other franchises with similar predicaments acted quickly. The Cavaliers could’ve facilitated a few trades to get more future draft assets in return, but they didn’t feel like taking on an albatross contract that would’ve been worth paying the extra tax this upcoming season.

The only other real decision to make was whether or not to retain David Nwaba, who, when healthy, displayed flashes of defensive excellence and aggressiveness on the offensive end, Cleveland did not extend the qualifying offer to Nwaba before the deadline, making him an unrestricted free agent. He recently signed with the Brooklyn Nets on a two-year deal.

This move was not so surprising as Basketball Insiders reported at the beginning of June that Nwaba’s representation would be looking for a multi-year deal. A league source said that last summer’s one-year agreement between the Cavaliers and Nwaba was with the understanding that he’d be strictly looking for a newly re-structured multi-year contract with no qualifying offer in his 2019 plans.

The latest addition the franchise made was inking Dean Wade, an undrafted rookie from Kansas State, to a two-way contract. He played in five NBA Summer League games for the organization between Salt Lake City and Las Vegas.

PLAYERS IN: Darius Garland, Dylan Windler, Kevin Porter Jr., Dean Wade (two-way)

PLAYERS OUT: JR Smith, Marquese Chriss, David Nwaba, Channing Frye

What’s Next

Following the waiving of Smith, the Cavaliers roster will be at 13 players. You’d imagine they wouldn’t keep two roster spots open, so seeing a free agent signing or even nabbing a player from a summer league team could be in the cards.

Per Fedor, the franchise will be above the $109 million salary cap by $22 million once the Smith news is made official by the team. It’s a much healthier number than they’ve been at in years past — so, going into next summer, that cap sheet is going to be as clean as it’s been in quite some time.

Cleveland is going to have numerous attractive contracts on its hands as five players on the roster are on deals set to expire following this year. Tristan Thompson ($18.5 million), Brandon Knight ($15.6 million), Jordan Clarkson ($13.4 million), John Henson ($9.7 million) and Matthew Dellavedova ($9.6 million) are all trade chips that Altman can move to stockpile the future even more. Depending on what offers come their way, it could be yet another busy season regarding roster turnover.

There’s plenty of speculation that the team should trade Love to a contender to both satisfy the player and allow the team to get out of his sizable deal. What people are forgetting is that the Cavaliers want to have a championship-caliber player in the locker room as a guiding voice. Remember, this team has one person that is at least the age of 30, and it is the All-Star big man. The next guys up are 28 years old—Henson, Dellavedova and Thompson—and who knows how long they’ll be around.

Cleveland will have to be blown away to take back what it thinks it should receive in return for Love. No deal will be made just to make a deal. The organization values him too much as a person and a player.

On the court, the focus is going to be on player development, mainly in watching how Sexton and Garland play off one another. Different looks and combinations with the frontcourt of Love, Nance Jr., Zizic, Windler and Osman will be available for Beilein to tinker with. A new coaching staff with a freshly enthused group of players should be intriguing to watch.

OFFSEASON GRADE: C-

Stay tuned to the rest of Basketball Insiders “Grading The Offseason” series over the next few weeks.

Continue Reading

NBA

NBA Daily: Veterans Influencing Spurs Youngsters

Having NBA veterans that can ease young players into the league can be very helpful, which is why Thomas Robinson and Darius Morris have been nice additions to the Spurs’ summer league roster.

Matt John

Published

on

The Summer League is a time for many things.

It’s a time for young players to get a taste of what professional basketball is like. It’s a time for teams to evaluate what young talent they have their roster. Most importantly of all, it’s a time for growth.

The Summer League, whether it be in Salt Lake, Sacramento or Las Vegas, serves as a transition for the new blood. Most are either fresh out of college or just arrived into the country, who are also either just beginning or have recently begun their NBA career. Making that transition isn’t always seamless. As talented as some of these kids are, they are prone to make mistakes. That’s where having a veteran who has been around the block can help.

For this year’s summer league. San Antonio brought in two who fit the profile: Thomas Robinson and Darius Morris.

Morris has bounced around between the NBA and the G League since being drafted 41st overall by the Lakers back in 2011. He’s been around the league long enough that playing in the Summer League wasn’t originally in the plans. That all changed when the Spurs called him.

“They actually reached out to me and told me they were interested,” Morris said. “When an organization like the Spurs calls you, you can come in and show that you can blend in and the high character is going to follow you the rest of the way.”

Robinson has also been a journeyman since being selected sixth overall by the Kings back in 2012. Now that he has found himself on the Spurs, he praised the organization for its player development.

“To even get any type of time under anybody on this staff is helpful for any player,” Robinson said. “Whether it’s summer league, mini-camp, or the real roster, it’s always helpful to learn from these guys. They’re like the Mecca of NBA basketball.”

Not many can say that they are the veteran of a summer league team, but Morris not only has that role but also appears to have embraced it since coming on for the Spurs. So much so that even though he takes that responsibility seriously, he and his teammates can have a laugh about it.

“I joke with the guys that I’m transitioning to that vet stage like a little baby vet,” Morris said. “To be able to extend whatever knowledge to the young guys, and kind of getting me in that mode as opposed to being that guy that was drafted, just transitioning to being a mentor and just helping where I can.”

There are various ways in which those are designated as mentors decide to use their role. Some give very little advice while others give nothing but advice. For Morris, he has implemented a “trial by fire” strategy for his younger teammates.

“First, you want them to go out there and play freely,” Morris said. “You don’t want to give them too much advice at first. You just kind of sit back and just watch… You don’t want to put too many things in their ear. Everything is already going 100 miles per hour for you out there and as they go along, just give my advice as we go along.”

As the other veteran/mentor on the squad, Robinson’s approach is simple on the court – just being himself for the Spurs.

“I’m not trying to show that I can do anything different,” Robinson said. “I just want to show that I’m doing everything that they ask me to do the first time.”

Since coming to San Antonio, Robinson has gotten to know some of the Spurs’ young talent. He even took the time to praise some of the Spurs’ young talent – in particular, one of the Spurs’ most recent first-rounders, Keldon Johnson.

“‘Baby Russ’. That’s what I called him” Robinson said. “He doesn’t get tired. He’s super aggressive… He’s big, athletic. I definitely see the makings of a superstar.”

Both Morris and Robinson are leaving impressions with the younger players on their squad. The Spurs other first-rounder this season, Luka Samanic, spoke highly of what they’ve been able to do for him primarily with how he handles his mistakes.

“If I do one quick mistake in the beginning, then it affects my game later,” Samanic said. “So they’re all about ‘Don’t worry about mistakes. You’ll miss shots. It’s all normal here.’ So they helped me a lot with that.”

Blake Ahearn, who coached the Spurs at the Utah Summer League, praised both Robinson and Morris for the calming influence they have on the team.

“It’s huge,” Ahearn said. “Having some of those calming-presence guys on the floor helps those younger guys… That’s a good luxury for coaches to have.”

Spurs assistant Becky Hammon also heaped praise for the two veterans primarily for what they have been able to do for the Spurs’ young players off the court while also reiterating the value guys like that have on these teams.

“They’ve been talking to them in their ear the whole time about what it takes to be a professional and get opportunities,” Hammon said. “Their leadership on the court, off the court has been very helpful. Obviously, having guys like that in a situation like that is very helpful and invaluable.”

Now, undoubtedly, the goal for Robinson and Morris is to be in the NBA again. They’ve been there before and their willingness to play in the summer league shows that they’re not giving up on their dreams.

Regardless of whether they make it, they can take comfort that, in the end, they positively impacted the Spurs of tomorrow.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

NBA Team Salaries

Advertisement

CloseUp360

Insiders On Twitter

NBA On Twitter

Trending Now