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The X-Factors: Houston

Needless to say, the three-point shooting Rockets have struggled in 2019-20, but Ben Nadeau doesn’t like their chances in a resumed postseason environment.

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The world is on fire.

And, frankly, the news of pending basketball hardly seems important in the slightest. The planet-wide pandemic and sweeping protests have turned everybody’s day-to-day routines on their head – but, obviously, for one group, it has done so in awful and disproportionate ways.

If you can donate, consider doing so. If you can’t donate, educate yourself. Even if you donate, continue to read, learn and listen.

Or try this: If you finish this article and come away having learned something — from a new three-point percentage to an underrated aspect — donate something of your own: Time, supplies, a tough conversation — whatever. Consider it a trade, do whatever it takes. Make a difference, even if it’s a small one.

The NBA is nearly back — how exactly (and with what measure of success) is yet to be seen, but there is a plan and structure worth building from. For teams on the bubble, getting into the play-in tournament will be the most and immediately pressing issue. But the other bracketed, locked-in franchises, jockeying for home-court advantage, must get serious and knock off that rust. Out westward, the stakes are even higher — and for those hungry at a postseason without the Warriors, this is a key moment in franchise history.

The Houston Rockets, now rostering two former MVPs and an insatiable drive to launch from downtown, are one of those teams. They’re one of the most accomplished franchises of the last decade, but Houston has nothing to show for it beyond playoff losses to Golden State in four of the last five years — and twice in the Conference Finals.

Heading into the home stretch, Houston is perched rather precariously — tied with the Dallas Mavericks for sixth place and just 2.5 games back of third. Needless to say, the difference between hosting the Oklahoma City Thunder or traveling away to face the Los Angeles Clippers is practically a deal-breaker for any true championship aspirations. So in order to make The Russell Westbrook Experiment a worthwhile endeavor, the Rockets as a whole must work as well.

Did you know that Houston currently ranks first in three-pointers made (15.4) and three-pointers attempted (44.4)? Yeah, probably. You already also knew that it’s been this way since 2015-16 when the Warriors were outpacing people — but, even then, the Rockets were still in second. Yet, over those four consecutive seasons as leaders in the three-point makes and attempts category, Houston never finished in the top ten for percentage.

Naturally, that checks out. The more you launch from deep, the less likely you are to be efficient — unless your name is Stephen Curry, but whenever.

From 2016-19, the Rockets finished 15th, 14th and 12th in three-point percentage, slowly creeping up toward that top ten range. This year? Well, they’re down to 23rd on just 34.8 percent.

By simple sorting measurements, you might be fooled into thinking that Houston ruled from behind the arc. But, really, that title belongs to the Dallas Mavericks this year. As the only franchise to live in the same zip code as the Rockets, the other Texas-based team knocked down 15.3 makes on 41.3 attempts for a much more palatable 36.9 conversion clip. And it’s a number that pushes Dallas into eighth for three-point percentage, an achievement, again, that Houston hasn’t reached since embracing that team-wide philosophy.

For a franchise that went all-in on the arc, 23rd-best in percentage is not a championship-winning formula.

Perhaps it was swapping Chris Paul — who shot 38, 35.8 and 36.2 percent from deep over his three years with Houston — for Westbrook, a future Hall of Famer that’s never boasted touch from long range. In fact, Westbrook is shooting a near career-low 25.4 percent on 3.8 attempts per game, only bested by a sophomore year effort of 22.1.

Harden is doing his best to make up for the difference, however, and he’s the current league-leader in field goal attempts, three-point makes, three-point attempts, free throws and free throw attempts. In a world without Curry, Harden hasn’t missed an opportunity to feast and he’ll finish with his third consecutive scoring title at 34.1 points per game — somehow both nearly four full points ahead of the second-placed Bradley Beal and also almost two fewer than he tallied each contest last year.

Marginally, though, Harden is down to 35.2 percent from three-point range after making 36.8 during his runner-up MVP campaign of 2018-19. It’s not a stat-buster for Houston, but it does lump onto the final number.

But the decline goes beyond the stars: Danuel House, a G League-made revelation over his 39 games with Houston last year, has gone from 41.6 to 36.3 percent — or, in other words, he’s made the same amount but with an extra miss per game. The unflappable Eric Gordon has dropped from 36 to 31.9, while Gerald Green (2.1 makes in 2018-19) has missed the entire season after breaking his foot during the preseason.

And although Austin Rivers (32.1 to 35.8), Gary Clark (29.7 to 35.3) and the addition of Robert Covington (35.7 over 14 games) have helped — they’re trending downward as a whole. When Houston made 37 percent or better from deep in 2019-20, they managed a ridiculous 23-1 record. Living and dying by the three-point line has its risks, though, and the Rockets struggled to just 14-18 when hitting under 34 percent. This is not a Houston-only problem, of course — but when it’s the offensive focus outside of get-James-Harden-the-ball, it quickly becomes a negative trait, not a positive one.

And if their sweeping philosophy is no longer the game-changer it once was — what is left? Confident as ever, the Rockets dealt their alley-oop, rim-protecting double-double machine (albeit an injured one) in order to play 34-year-old P.J. Tucker (6-foot-5, 37 percent from three-point range) even more at center.

It’s a bold strategy and one that hasn’t elevated the Rockets just yet.

With a healthy Clint Capela, Houston went 22-17. And when he scored his season average of 14 points or more, the Rockets only lost five times. Since Robert Covington was swapped in for Capela, they notched an 8-6 record and lost four of their last five heading into the pandemic stoppage. A small sample size, sure, but the sacrifice of Capela for Tucker’s ability to stretch the floor and the wing defense of Covington left the Rockets with as many weaknesses as before.

Moving Capela — 25, entering his prime and under contract until 2022-23 — might be the type of short-sighted, win-now move that Houston will rue for years to come.

Depending on how the conference standings shake out, they’ll likely have a date with the Jazz, Nuggets or Clippers in the postseason — all of whom boast big-game centers. Even with their former big man, the Rockets struggled to slow the likes of Rudy Gobert, Nikola Jokic and Montrezl Harrell throughout 2019-20. During a late January game in Denver, Jokic dropped 24 points, 12 rebounds and 11 assists on 9-for-18 shooting in a seven-point win — and Capela actually played 28 minutes in that one.

Later on, in a Mar. 5 post-trade loss to the Clippers, both Ivica Zubac (17 points, 12 rebounds) and Harrell (19, 10) posted double-doubles in only 22 minutes.

In the end, if the Rockets are so willing to concede the paint to their opponents, they’ve really got to make their three-pointers at a more consistent rate — period.

And if they’re banking on Westbrook suddenly improving from deep, that’d be unwise too. The superstar’s best-ever mark from deep is 34.3 percent, way back in 2016-17. Again, that’s a mark that Paul easily surpassed in Houston three times in a row and one that would stand as a career-low for Harden.

The Paul contract was a salary cap killer, make no mistake — but at least he fit the team-wide makeup. Aside from forcing a square peg in a round hole, it puts most of the pressure on Harden’s shoulders to not only be the franchise star, but the game-changing X-Factor as well.

When Harden is cooking, there are few better shows in league history. But without him performing absolute magic over a seven-game series, the Rockets have little chance of even winning their first-round matchup, regardless of home-court advantage or the opposing team. By putting all their eggs in the Harden-Westbrook and small ball basket, they’ve made their once-great three-point advantage noticeably worse and surrendered another piece of the floor entirely.

It’s not good news — but at least they’ve still got James Harden.

Ben Nadeau is a Seattle-based writer in his third year with Basketball Insiders. For five seasons, he covered the Brooklyn Nets for The Brooklyn Game.

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Bulls’ guard Zach LaVine desires respect for new contract

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According to ESPN’s Brian Windhorst, Chicago Bulls star Zach LaVine wants the respect he deserves for his contract extension. On Monday morning before Team USA’s practice to prepare for Tuesday’s match against Spain, the 26-year-old guard said to reporters, “I just want my respect, that’s the main thing. I outplayed my contract. I’ve been very loyal to Chicago. I like Chicago. I just want my respect. If that’s now or later, it’s something we’ve got to work out internally.” In the 2020-21 season, in 58 games played, LaVine averaged 27.4 points, five rebounds and 4.9 assists per game. He also shot 50.7 percent from the field and was selected to his first NBA All-Star Game.

Regarding the “outplayed my contract” comment, his argument his fair. Last season, with 200 three-point field goals made, he ranked ninth overall in the league. Despite the Bulls finishing 31-41 (.431) last season, he led the team in points and assists. Per ESPN, they are also reporting that Chicago is trying to work out a four-year, $105 million contract extension for their star guard. Though, this deal is expected to fall below his market value. In terms of signing available free agents this offseason, some Bulls fans are speculating the organization will pursue either Knicks’ shooting guard/small forward Reggie Bullock, Lakers’ power forward/center Markieff Morris or Pelicans’ point guard Lonzo Ball.

On July 13, 2018, the 2014 13th pick of the draft signed a four-year, $78 million contract with the Bulls. LaVine earned $19,500,000 last season, and he is set to earn $19,500,000 in the upcoming season. It is not urgent for Chicago to extend LaVine’s contract this offseason. The organization will have the full rights to re-sign him to a new deal for next season in 2022.

However, the guard will also become an unrestricted free agent next year, so the Bulls should work towards fixing their salary cap issues right now. Referencing Spotrac, center Nikola Vucevic has a cap figure of $24 million. Of this amount, his future guaranteed cash is $22 million. One notable 2021-22 cap hold is Lauri Markkanen. His qualifying offer is $9,026,952, and his cap figure is $20,194,524. On March 2, 2020, Markkanen was recalled from the Windy City Bulls of the G League.

Furthermore, on March 25, 2021, center Nikola Vucevic and forward Al-Farouq Aminu were traded by the Orlando Magic to the Bulls in exchange for Otto Porter, Wendell Carter Jr., a 2021 first-round pick and a 2023 first-round pick. This is quite the gamble for the Bulls organization, considering they traded away two future first-round picks. Vucevic is set to earn $24 million for the 2021-22 season. Chicago has $56,679,846 available in cap space. Their current luxury tax space is $29,405746.

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Rockets decline Avery Bradley’s $5.9 million team option

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First reported by Shams Charania of The Athletic, the Houston Rockets are declining Avery Bradley’s team option for the 2021-22 NBA season. On November 23, 2020, the 30-year-old guard signed as a free agent with the Miami Heat. He signed a two-year, $11.6 million deal. On March 25, 2021, the Heat traded Bradley, Kelly Olynyk and a 2022 first-round pick to the Houston Rockets for two-time NBA All-Star guard Victor Oladipo. The 2022 first-round pick is an option to trade for a potential Heat or Nets pick. Plus, Houston received a trade exception, too.

Moreover, Bradley earned $5,635,000 this previous season; the Rockets declined his 2021-22 team option of $5,916,750 for next season. In other words, both sides have mutually agreed to part ways, so the six-foot-three guard is now an unrestricted free agent. In early February, it was first reported that the Washington native would miss three to four weeks due to a calf strain. Before this injury, he averaged 8.5 points, 1.8 rebounds and 1.4 assists per game for Miami. Furthermore, he also shot a career-high percentage of 42.1 percent from behind the arc last season.

Though, Bradley disappointed both of his teams last season, leading to the Rockets finishing 17-55 (.236), ranking 15th overall in the Western Conference. Last season was the first time since the 1982-83 season that Houston failed to win at least 20 games. Since the 2011-12 season, it was the first time the Rockets had failed to qualify for the playoffs. In only 27 games played, the 11-year NBA veteran averaged 6.4 points, 2.1 rebounds and 1.7 assists per game. He shot 37.4 percent from the field as well.

Likewise, the Miami Heat finished 40-32 (.556) last season, regressing from the team’s 44-29 (.603) record and sixth NBA Finals appearance from the 2019-20 season. Fans across social media are already speculating that the 2010 19th overall pick will end up playing for the Los Angeles Lakers next season. If this happens, he would join the team’s newly established big three: LeBron James, Anthony Davis, and Russell Westbrook.

After Bradley signed with the Lakers for the 2019-20 season, he joined the list of players in the league’s history who played for both the Celtics and Lakers. The list includes Brian Shaw, Clyde Lovellette, Mel Counts, Rick Fox, Don Nelson, Bob McAdoo, Isaiah Thomas, Charlie Scott, Gary Payton, Shaquille O’Neal and Rajon Rondo. According to Bleacher Report, the Lakers are also interested in signing Carmelo Anthony this offseason.

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Mavericks will pick up Willie Cauley-Stein’s $4.1 million option

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Per ESPN’s Tim MacMahon, the Dallas Mavericks are planning to pick up center Willie Cauley-Stein’s $4.1 million option for the 2021-22 NBA season. The deadline is tomorrow. Last season, in 53 games played, the seven-foot big man averaged 5.3 points and 4.5 rebounds per game. The sixth-year player also shot 63.2 percent from the field last season.

On July 8, 2019, Cauley-Stein signed a two-year, $4.46 million contract with the Golden State Warriors. Then, on January 25, 2020, Cauley-Stein was traded to the Mavericks for a 2020 second-round pick. If everything goes smoothly, the 27-year-old center is set to earn $4.1 million next season. The 2015 sixth overall pick’s contract consumes less than three percent of the team’s total salary cap.

This news comes right after Dallas received center Moses Brown from the Boston Celtics. Brown is a seven-foot-two, 2019 undrafted player out of UCLA. In 2021, Brown was named to the All-NBA G League First Team and All-Defensive Team. On March 28, 2021, the 21-year-old center signed a four-year, $6.8 million contract with the Thunder.

However, on June 18, 2021, the Oklahoma City Thunder traded Brown, Al Horford, and a 2023 second-round pick to the Celtics for Kemba Walker, a 2021 first-round pick and a 2025 second-round pick. With Boston, Brown was set to earn $1,701,593 next season. Of course, the Mavs organization is finalizing a trade to send Josh Richardson to the Celtics as well. In other news, today is Mavs owner Mark Cuban’s 63rd birthday.

Referencing Spotrac’s 2021-22 luxury tax totals, the Mavs’ current luxury tax space is $52,326,531. The 2021 NBA salary cap maximum is $112,414,000. Their current cap space is $27,595,632. Cauley-Stein’s contract is recognized as a club option, not a player option or guaranteed money. Richardson’s deadline is also tomorrow, so because he is getting traded to Boston, the team will not collect his $11,615,328 player option.

Plus, Jalen Brunson’s deadline is also August 1st. His guaranteed value is $1,802,057. Leading into the 2021-22 season, Kristaps Porzingis has the highest cap figure on the team, which is an amount worth $31,650,600, consuming 22.73 percent of the team’s total salary cap. At the moment, Porzingis is a popular name in trade rumor articles. Bettors and NBA analysts are predicting a possible trade to the Brooklyn Nets, Sacramento Kings or Philadelphia 76ers.

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