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NBA Daily: Free Agency Watch – Days 2-3

As we enter the third day of NBA Free Agency, Drew Maresca assesses the major moves we’ve seen since the start.

Drew Maresca

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NBA Free Agency started six hours earlier than it has in years past in 2019, with a start time of 6 p.m. EST on June 30. And boy did it pay dividends for fans. Rather than staying up late or getting caught up on free agent happenings the first thing in the morning, fans were instead treated to a primetime bonanza of free agent activity this year.

Basketball Insiders’ Matt John did a splendid job of outlining all major happenings from day one, which saw the construction of a new super-team, the next phase of development in Utah and lots of questions around what constitutes tampering to the NBA league office.

As we entered day two, we saw the narratives shift from top players signings to secondary players securing their deals and processing additional information about day one signings.

But there are plenty of questions left unanswered. So without further ado, let’s jump into the more noteworthy happenings since July 1.

Maybe New York’s 2019 Free Agency Wasn’t So Bad After All

The Knicks have been the laughingstock of the league long enough to know when they’re the butt of the joke. And this free agency period started off no different. They missed out on Kevin Durant. And Kyrie Irving. And Kemba Walker. And D’Angelo Russell. And pretty much everyone else that the media identified as targets of the Knicks.

They instead walked away from the first day of free agency with Julius Randle (3-year/$63 million), Taj Gibson (2-year/$20 million), Bobby Portis (2-year/$31 million) and Reggie Bullock (2-year/$21 million) — and they added Elfrid Payton (2-year/$16 million) and Wayne Ellington (2-year/$16 million) on July 1. New Yorkers were displeased.

But reports emerged midday on Monday confirming that all but Randle’s contract featured team options after the first season. That means that the salary cap flexibility that the Knicks carved out for 2019 free agency could be available again come next summer. The Knicks can spend the better part of 2019-20 assessing their five signees and finding out which ones are worth hanging onto long term. They can also trade any of them who increase in value and/or become redundant – all the while, maintaining flexibility to make a run at free agents next year. And sure, next year’s free agent class is projected to be weak; however, if Kawhi Leonard returns to Toronto on a one-plus-one, that changes the entire narrative.

While this may not be the solution the Knicks (or Knicks fans) wanted, it preserves hope  – which is more than it looked like they would end up with on Sunday evening.

The Clippers Are Remaining Patient

Kawhi Leonard is an enigmatic fellow. He marches to the beat of his own drum. He does not seek out attention. He does not trash talk. He is essentially the antithesis of the modern basketball player. And yet, he has been at the center of the basketball universe since approximately April.

Leonard is currently an unrestricted free agent; and despite being arguably the most sought-after free agent this summer, he has not yet made a decision regarding where he will play in 2019-20.

One thing seems fairly certain, though: Leonard will play in either Los Angeles or Toronto. He will allegedly take meetings with the Clippers, Lakers and Raptors this week in L.A. Where he’ll end up is anyone’s guess; however, his deliberate approach is delaying lots of other free agent decisions – most notably for the Clippers.

The Clippers entered free agency pegged as a major destination given their ability to offer two-max contracts. And yet, they have only signed Patrick Beverly (3-year/$40 million), guaranteed Lou Williams contract in advance, took on Moe Harkless as part of a bigger sign-and-trade (receiving a future first-round pick for their troubles) and signed Rodney McGruder (3-year/$15 million). All of which has not hurt their ability to offer Leonard a max contract.

Harkless is a nice player, as is McGruder, but the Clippers are clearly all in on Leonard. They have already spent much of the first two days of free agency waiting for Leonard before moving on any other major decisions, and they will probably wait a few more.

Leonard represents a return to relevance for the Clippers. His signing will shift the balance of power for the entire NBA. But like the Knicks, the Clippers should be cautious about who they sign if Leonard opts for a different employer. Owner Steve Ballmer’s regime will be tested if Leonard passes and their best course of action is to remain patient – for an entire season.

But the Knicks can attest that keeping your cross-town rival from getting a player of Leonard’s caliber is just as important as getting him yourself – at least from a PR standpoint. So it’s full steam ahead for the Clippers until they hear otherwise from Leonard.

Miami Gets Jimmy Butler, But Can’t Add Much Else

Jimmy Butler turned down a full max deal with the 76ers. Butler made it clear that he wanted to join the Miami HEAT shortly after the start of free agency. After some false starts that involved the Dallas Mavericks, the HEAT finally reached an agreement that three other teams and the signing of Butler to a 4-year/$142 million deal.

The Blazers were operative in the deal, taking back Whiteside and sending Meyers Leonard to Miami. They also shipped Harkless to the Clippers. The 76ers received Josh Richardson back from Miami.

But what’s left for Miami to build around? The HEAT cannot get below the salary cap ($109.14 million) despite possessing a number of player options.. They can try to get creative with Goran Dragic’s contract – after all, they own most of their future first-round picks (except for 2021, which is ironically owed to Phoenix from the Dragic trade); they only own one of their next five second-round picks. So depending on who they’re looking to add, they might have to attach multiple first-round picks (again). And depending on the return, that equation shifts from creative to crazy.

But Butler turns 30 in September.  The HEAT clearly don’t want to waste his prime years. They should consider any upgrades to their roster – even if it means going deeper into debt. Because why else bring in the star if you weren’t planning on surrounding him with talent? Butler, Meyers Leonard and Justise Winslow is a nice start. Kelly Olynyk is a good role player. Dion Waiters is Dion Waiters. But if that’s your team (plus Dragic), you’re going to struggle to get out of the first-round.

The Golden State Warriors Attempt To Retool Around Their Original Core

Klay Thompson resigned with the Warriors for 5-years/$190 million. But Thompson will miss most of next season due to a knee injury suffered in game five of the NBA Finals. Steph Curry is signed through 2022 and Draymond Green is eligible following the 2019-20 season. So it appears as though the Warriors will build around its original core.

And it looks like they’ve begun doing so. Yes, they lost Kevin Durant to Brooklyn. But shortly after that deal was announced, news leaked that Durant-to-Brooklyn would be part of a larger sign-and-trade deal that included D’Angelo Russell signing a 4-years/$117 million deal with the Warriors, which cost the Warriors Andre Iguodala and a future first-round pick and also included the Memphis Grizzlies.

Russell represents a capable fill-in for Klay Thompson while he recovers from knee surgery. Russell and Steph Curry can both thrive on and off the ball; so while it’s a step back from Thompson given his defense, shooting and overall synergy with his teammates, Russell can power an offense and provide shooting and playmaking in a way that Thompson can’t. And after Thompson returns, the Warriors can either trade him for a more appropriate player or keep him around to see how the three could work together.

The Warriors also received Shabazz Napier and Treveon Graham in the sign-and-trade, but rerouted the two to Minnesota.

Furthermore, the Warriors signed former Sacramento Kings big man Willie Cauley-Stein for an unconfirmed amount. They also re-signed Kevon Looney to a three-year/$15 million deal.

So the 2019-20 Warriors roster is beginning to take shape. Free agency is still only three-and-a-half day old and it will be interesting to see who else the Warriors are able to add. But the Warriors are well over the cap (approximately $140 million in salary commitments for 2019-20), so they’ll have to be patient and grab minimum salary guys looking to either play with a winner or in the new San Francisco arena.

The Other Shoe Has Begun To Drop

(More than) qualified role players traditionally sign with contending teams for a discount. This allows them to compete for a championship and gets the team above average, veteran talent. This year, that philosophy remains unchanged

Yesterday evening, we saw three names come off the list of qualified role players: Wilson Chandler (1-year deal with the Brooklyn Nets), Jared Dudley (1-year/ $2.6 million with the Los Angeles Lakers) and Jeff Green (1-year/$2.5 million deal with the Utah Jazz).

The aforementioned players can all still play a relatively big role on a contender. Dudley was last seen brilliantly defending Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid in the first-round of the Eastern Conference playoffs. He brings leadership, grit and a very high basketball IQ.

Chandler and Green may do less of the dirty work, but they can both shoulder more of the offensive load. Chandler had a down year in Los Angeles in 2018-19, but he’s still only 32. And Green – also 32 –has always been seen as an ultra-versatile, albeit slightly passive, forward. He’s best when playing next to an alpha; but when he is, he can be quite effective. So much so that his signing prompted Dwyane Wade to take to Twitter in a rant questioning why Green has signed three straight minimum deals considering his skill set.

What’s more noteworthy than who has been signed, is where they’re going, though: Brooklyn, L.A. and Utah – three places not seen as key free agent destinations as recently as last year. Clearly, players are more concerned with who is on their new team’s roster than they are with the destination and/or region to call their new home. We’ll almost certainly see more of these bargain signings are free agency drags on. Which teams will sign discounted deals and with whom they’ll sign them will be key.

Free agency fireworks typically taper off after the first few days. Luckily for us, , we could be in for a drawn-out free agency thanks in part to Leonard. And with lots of other players awaiting his decision before making a move, we could be in a serious holding pattern.

Either way, this has already been a historically entertaining free agency – and it’s only July 3.

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Buy Or Sell: Atlantic Division

Drew Maresca continues Basketball Insiders’ “Buy Or Sell” series by taking a look at the Atlantic Division.

Drew Maresca

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The early portion of the NBA season is fun for lots of reasons – namely, it helps determine which teams are contenders and those that aren’t. Additionally, it allows teams to gauge and grade their rosters. And on December 15, when newly signed players can be traded, the NBA season shifts gears from fun to cut-throat.

So with that beings said, let’s forge ahead with Basketball Insiders examination of buyers and sellers. We have already covered the Northwest, Southwest and Central divisions. Today, we’ll turn our attention to the Atlantic.

Boston Celtics 17-7 — Buyers

The Celtics have surprised most NBA experts so far this season. But not only because they’re playing well; more so due to looking significantly better than last season despite losing a top-flight point guard (Kyrie Irving), a workhouse center (Al Horford) and then replacing them with less talented players.

The Celtics are 17-7 through 24 games — good for fourth place in the conference. Entering Friday night, they’re playing at essentially the same pace as last season (99.2 possessions per 48 minutes vs. 99.6 in 2018-19), but with an average margin of victory of 7.86 (up from. 4.44), which is the fourth-best margin of victory in the league.

But it’s unlikely that the Celtics are satisfied with their early-season successes. And if they hope to crash the Milwaukee Bucks’ party and represent the Eastern Conference in the NBA Finals, they’ll need some to add some depth to their frontcourt.

Despite being nearly 30 percent of the way through the season, the Celtics still need to shore up the center position. They entered the season with a by-committee approach from the beginning and they’ve stuck to it so far by starting Daniel Theis a whopping 18 times, Kanter three times and Robert Williams twice. Theis averages 21.8 minutes per game, compared to Kanter’s 15.8 and Williams’ 14.2. While the three-headed monster approach can be successful, they lack a true difference-maker.

They’ll need a more skilled and versatile center to put pressure on opposing big men like Joel Embiid and Al Horford, while also keeping the floor appropriately spaced. While good centers are hard to come by, the Celtics could package some combination of their rookies and future picks to entice a trade partner.

And it would be in their best interest to do so. Just look at their record against the Philadelphia 76ers this season. While it’s a ridiculously small sample size, their 0-2 record against Philadelphia, who boasts probably the biggest and best frontcourt in the league, should scare them into adding a big man before the deadline – and maybe as soon as this Sunday.

Brooklyn Nets (13-11) — Neither

The Nets have surprised folks, too — but unlike the Celtics, they did so through early struggles. With the newly acquired Kyrie Irving in tow, the Nets started the season by winning only four of their first 11 games – during which time, Caris LeVert suffered an injury, followed by Irving. And just like that, the sky was falling.

But then something monumental happened, proceedings just stabilized all at once. The Nets have won nine of their last 13 games since Irving’s injury. Spencer Dinwiddie stepped up, averaging 25.1 points per game in Irving’s absence. But it’s not all Dinwiddie. Since Irving went out, the Nets are 13th-best in net rating – compared to 20th with him in the lineup – and their chemistry looks much improved.

And what’s more, the Nets can still look forward to adding Irving back into the rotation. While they’ve struggled with him thus far, it’s not entirely Irving. After all, Irving’s return represents a major talent who was averaging 28.5 points and 7.2 assists per game. Dzanan Musa and Theo Pinson, too, have largely failed to fill in as the backup point guard too.

Sure, it’s going to take time to figure out their identity with Irving suited up. And the team must also welcome back LeVert and Wilson Chandler, who is set to return from a 25-game PED suspension on Sunday. But those are great problems to have.

Fortunately, the Nets’ 2019-20 season was always a placeholder until Kevin Durant returns from his Achilles injury. The team shouldn’t worry too much about a playoff run and, instead, they should be squarely focused on building exceptional team chemistry. And adding or subtracting to a newly-formed roster is a terrible way to do so.

Thus, playoffs or not, the Nets should spend the next three or so months learning one another’s styles and identifying their best rotations without tinkering.

New York Knicks (5-20) – Sellers

The Knicks are very obviously a dumpster fire. They have failed to properly develop their young talent through 25 games this year and prioritized playing time for a slew of their recently signed veteran free agents. Additionally, they panicked after a couple of 30-point losses and decided to fire coach head coach David Fizdale.

There are probably more firings to come. Rumors have begun to circulate about the job security of team president Steve Mills and general manager Scott Perry. But regardless of who’s at the helm, the Knicks must move many of their recent signees to capitalize on their favorable contracts.

The vultures have already begun to circle. According to SNY’s Ian Begley, interested teams could be willing to part with a late first-round pick in exchange for Marcus Morris.

The team should also begin shopping Taj Gibson, Bobby Portis, Wayne Ellington, Reggie Bullock (who has been injured so far all season), Elfrid Payton and even Julius Randle. Cashing in on any of those players would be helpful to a team that is clearly still in the early stages of a rebuild.

And they should be looking to acquire young players who are still viewed as projects — like the Orlando Magic did with Markelle Fultz last season — and/or draft picks. Nothing else. Fit does not matter. Bring in as much talent as you can and see what sticks.

Philadelphia 76ers (19-7) – Buyers

The 76ers are another Atlantic Division buyer.

Despite losing Jimmy Butler to Miami and JJ Redick to New Orleans, the 76ers entered the season with extremely high expectations — and they’ve mostly lived up to them. They are 18-7 overall and 7-3 against teams who are .500 or better. Joel Embiid is better than ever and Al Horford appears to be hitting his stride in Philadelphia. Further, Josh Richardson has looked like an extremely promising fit when healthy and rookie Matisse Thybulle has performed better than anyone could have expected.

So what do the 76ers need to add? One thing: Shooting. The 76ers rank 26th in three-point attempts and the team is currently lacking a Redick-level three-point threat. We’ve all seen opposing defenses, as the Raptors did in the 2019 playoffs, go under screens and sag away from Ben Simmons. Expect more of that. And expect teams to willingly pack the paint to affect Embiid, Simmons and Horford until the team surrounds them with more shooters.

The 76ers should be targeting guys like Kevin Love, Robert Covington, Danilo Gallinari, Marcus Moris, Davis Bertans and even the aforementioned Reddick – any of whom would be an excellent addition if the 76ers could put together an acceptable offer. But that’s where things get challenging. Remember, the 76ers have approximately $126 million tied up in their core five (Embiid, Horford, Simmons, Richardson and Tobias Harris) for 2020-21.

Toronto Raptors (16-8) – Sellers

This may be an unpopular opinion, but this at its core, shouldn’t teams either compete for championships or set themselves up to do so? Obviously that’s easier said than done and there are a number of teams that don’t adhere to such strategy because of the primary driver of profitability.

That being said,  the Raptors are coming off a championship and just lost a player that many believe is one of the three best alive. In all likelihood, they’re not quite ready for primetime again, despite what their record suggests. Toronto’s primary focus now should be building around their young talent and adding even more to a team that is already ahead of schedule.

Their roster isn’t well-aligned from an age standpoint, anyway. Their 25-year-old centerpiece (Pascal Siakam) and relatively young core are on a different trajectory than aging stars Kyle Lowry, 33, Marc Gasol, 34, and Serge Ibaka, 30. What’s more, Gasol and Ibaka are on expiring contracts that’ll be chased by contenders looking to add versatile big men – like Boston.

Lowry is different given what he’s meant to the team and the entire city of Toronto. There is a clear benefit to keeping him on as a locker room leader and having him retire a Raptor. Even if they wanted to move Lowry, it would be challenging as he’s signed through next season.

But that doesn’t mean that moving him isn’t worth exploring. Plenty of contenders would benefit from Lowry’s services, even with another season at $30.5 million. Lowry can still lead a team and he’s a fearless competitor. Cooler, the former All-Star has played better this year than in the previous two seasons, scoring 19.1 points in 37 minutes of action per night across 13 games.

Considering how unlikely the Raptors are to win the Eastern Conference again, they should seriously consider moving at least one of their slightly-older stars. It could be one of their last opportunities to add additional building blocks. And as we saw last February and in previous seasons, contenders make silly deals as the trade deadline approaches.

December is an extremely exciting time for the basketball world. Christmas Day represents the sport’s first real prime time opportunity of the young season. But for many, the holiday comes nine days early as teams can begin trading players who were signed last offseason.

But it doesn’t stop there, intensifying in the lead up to the Feb. 6 trade deadline. So let’s all sit back and enjoy the best time of the year, all kicking off in just two days.

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NBA Daily: Devonte’ Graham’s Unfathomable Breakout In Charlotte

Devonte’ Graham never drew high praise in high school, college or in draft prep. Breaking through in his second season is a rarity unlike almost any other. Douglas Farmer writes.

Douglas Farmer

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Comparing a sweet-shooting, 6-foot-2 guard in his second year with the woebegone Charlotte Hornets to Draymond Green misses its mark on paper, but the poor-shooting forward in his eighth season — three of which have ended with him and the Golden State Warriors hosting an NBA Finals trophy — may be the only player in the league analogous to Devonte’ Graham.

Teams have sought the next Green since he broke through in his third year, seeking a playmaking forward who could defend all five positions. That largely-fruitless search overlooked what made Green so unique — just how overlooked he was.

The No. 122 player in his recruiting class, per Rivals.com, Green did not break into college basketball’s national consciousness until his senior season when he was named a consensus All-American. That pushed him up draft boards all the way to No. 35. He then toiled on the Warrior bench until stepping in for overpriced veteran and changing the trajectory of the Golden State franchise.

Graham was the No. 36 player in his class, per Rivals.com, but otherwise the parallels are nearly exact, and while not as insulting as Green’s recruiting ranking, Graham’s was hardly flattering. He then became a consensus All-American in his senior season, was drafted No. 34 overall and spent his rookie season primarily on the Hornets’ bench. Now, he has usurped free-agent signee Terry Rozier of his starring role and given Charlotte reason to be excited.

Those reasons to be excited are not limited to the long-term, either, as some of Graham’s 20 points per game have included moments of high drama.

Graham’s second-year explosion has come largely off catch-and-shoot threes, clearly showing how different he is from Green, even if their rises from nowhere are similar. Graham has already made 103 threes in just 27 games, a sample size both large enough to end any “Breakout or Mirage? wonders and put him in the company of James Harden and Stephen Curry.

Only Harden and Curry had made it this far into a season on pace to sink 300 shots from deep, and they are also the only ones to actually do so. Maybe Graham cools off and finishes with a mere 280, but given he spent the first 10 games this season coming off the bench, his current pace will likely send him well past 300.

Either way, Graham was never supposed to end up in a sentence comparing him to two surefire Hall of Famers. 

Recruits who debate between Virginia Tech, Providence and North Carolina State before ending up at Kansas, who never garner genuine notice until they are three months shy of turning 25, do not break out like this. They go onto decent NBA careers, if that.

While plenty of highly-ranked prep prospects do not pan out at all, it is even rarer for second-tier recruits to reach professional stardom. Of the 120 players Rivals ranked between No. 30 and No. 50 in the six recruiting classes from 2010 to 2015, only 14 have gained genuine traction in the NBA.

2010: No. 31 Meyers Leonard, No. 44 Gorgui Dieng, No. 48 Terrence Ross
2011: No. 31 Dorian Finney-Smith, No. 34 Ben McLemore, No. 37 Otto Porter, No. 41 Maurice Harkless
2012: No. 40 Willie Cauley-Stein
2013: No. 31 Semi Ojeleye, No. 44 Zach LaVine
2014: No. 36 Devonte’ Graham
2015: No. 31 Donovan Mitchell, No. 43 Malik Beasley, No. 46 Dejounte Murray

Porter, LaVine and Mitchell all earned enough notice in college to be drafted in the lottery. Their development into NBA bucket-getters has not been astonishing. It was their play in college that surprised.

Graham did not impress then. Nor did he impress as a rookie, averaging 4.7 points in 14.7 minutes per game and hitting only 28.1 percent of his shots from beyond the arc.

Becoming a 42.9 percent 3-point shooter was not anyone’s expectation. Even in college, Graham topped out at 40.6 percent from behind the shorter arc as a senior when he averaged 17.3 points per game.

Now, he casually went 7-of-12 from deep for 40 points, 5 assists and 5 rebounds on Wednesday in a 113-108 road win over the Brooklyn Nets. The seventh of those made threes drove the fact one more time that Graham is not a flash in the pan.

“Unconscionable” is an overused word in sports. These are just sports, after all. But if ever a shot was unconscionable, it was that dagger on Wednesday. If not that, it may have been unfathomable.

Unfathomable when only Graham’s late prep development got him to a collegiate blueblood, unfathomable when he hardly flashed at Kansas, unfathomable when he fell into the second round, unfathomable when Charlotte signed Rozier for three years and $58 million.

Graham was never supposed to do any of this, and he shows no signs of stopping.

In the first 10 games of the season coming off the bench, Graham shot 42.5 percent from deep and averaged 17.9 points and 7.6 assists per game. In his 17 starts since then, he is shooting 43.1 percent from deep and averaging 21.2 points and 7.6 assists per game.

His consistency has rendered the 6-foot-1 Rozier not just an overpriced point guard, but a lineup liability. With both of them on the floor, Charlotte has a minus-3.1 rating per 100 possessions, getting exposed on defense with an undersized backcourt. With Graham on but Rozier off, the Hornets are plus-1.6. The offensive ratings are within a tenth of a point, but the latter lineup is 4.8 points better per 100 possessions on defense.

Come Sunday, Rozier can be traded. Finding a taker for his onerous deal may be more difficult than one for Graham’s, which pays him only $1.4 million this year and $1.7 million next. Regardless, if Charlotte moves one of them, the organization will be in a better position moving forward because of Graham’s eruption.

At no point was it considered Graham could change the franchise’s direction like this.

Then again, it was never expected of Green, either.

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Buy Or Sell: Central Division

Drew Mays continues Basketball Insiders’ “Buy Or Sell” series by taking a look at the Central Division.

Drew Mays

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It’s Dec. 12, and we’re over a quarter of the way through the 2019-20 NBA season. More importantly, we’re three days away from the 15th – the day much of the league because trade-eligible.

By now, teams have a good idea of who they are and where they want to be in four months when the playoffs roll around. This means they also know something else: Whether what they have in the locker room is enough, if they’re missing a piece, or if their season is toast and they should wheel and deal before the February trade deadline.

These thoughts inspired the Basketball Insiders’ “Buy Or Sell” series. Matt John led us off a few days ago by breaking down the Northwest Division. Yesterday, Jordan Hicks batted second with the Southwest Division. Today we’ll be checking on the division with the hottest team in the NBA: The Central.

Milwaukee Bucks (22-3) – Buyers (?)

Can anyone stop Milwaukee? They’ve won 16 straight, 20 of 21, and haven’t lost since Nov. 8. While part of this stretch has involved beating up lesser teams — and winning games you’re supposed to isn’t a bad thing — undoubtedly the most impressive performance came last Friday at home against the Los Angeles Clippers. They won 119-91 and it was even uglier than that. Los Angeles was down nine at halftime and 25 after three quarters. The Bucks held the Clippers’ three offensive stars – Paul George, Kawhi Leonard and Lou Williams – to 15-for-39 shooting and forced them into 15 turnovers (LA shot 35 percent and committed 21 turnovers as a team).

What Milwaukee did to the Clippers isn’t an outlier, either. They’ve blitzed the entire league on both ends of the floor. They’re first in defensive rating, third in offensive rating and first in average margin of victory at 13.4 points. They aren’t just winning – they’re winning big. They have the best effective field goal percentage in the NBA and the second-best allowed on defense.

The Bucks are deep and have 12 guys that get significant minutes. Giannis Antetokounmpo is the only player above 30 minutes per game, with the rest of the roster falling in succession down to Robin Lopez’s 14.5 per. They’re shooting extremely well while still making the third-most threes per game in the league at 14.4. Nine different players make at least one every game.

Even scarier, Giannis keeps evolving. His three-point shooting volume has been a revelation – he’s taking five each night. He’s never taken more than three. And even shooting only 31.9 percent, the attempts in themselves (and Giannis’ willingness to shoot them) has opened up the offense more than ever before. It’s led to Antetokounmpo somehow topping his numbers from last season – he’s up from 27.7/12.5/5.9 to 30.9/13.2/5.5. Sheesh.

There’s a huge scoring drop off after Giannis, though. Only Khris Middleton, Eric Bledsoe and Brook Lopez join him in double figures. They could use another scorer or playmaker. People have long half-jokingly floated the idea of Chris Paul, but that seems unlikely. There may not be a player on the market worth chasing based on their needs.

Still, the lack of extra scoring punch behind the MVP might not even be an issue until the postseason. Until then, Milwaukee fans can enjoy the ride – the Bucks shouldn’t have worries for a while.

Indiana Pacers (16-9) – Buyers

After a slow start, Indiana has rejoined the upper cluster of the Eastern Conference. They’ve won nine of their last 12 and sit in the top half of the league in both offensive (15th) and defensive (10th) rating.

Like Milwaukee, Indiana boasts a ton of depth – they have nine regulars that play over 17 minutes per game. Malcolm Brogdon continues to be the Pacers’ engine, averaging 19.5/4.5/7.5. TJ Warren seems to have found his footing and Domantas Sabonis has been a beast, scoring 18.2 and grabbing 13.5 rebounds every night.

That said, the Pacers suffer a similar problem as the Bucks – they lack high-end talent. Their better part of the rotation is similar to Milwaukee’s non-Giannis top players; they’re useful, productive role players, but not guys you expect to beat teams with more star power.

This lends itself to Indiana being buyers over the next few months. They could add another on-ball threat to pair with Brogdon, thus making things easier for Sabonis and the assist-allergic Warren. TJ McConnell and the pair of Holiday brothers have performed admirably to this point, but no one in the conference is batting an eye at those three.

Of course, the Pacers already have a top-flight scorer and shot creator coming – Victor Oladipo. Oladipo has been out since January and is expected to return in the next few months.

Assuming he’s able to at all, it’ll take him time to get back to form. The likeliest scenario isn’t that the Pacers buy prior to the deadline, but that they continue rolling out their massive lineup and stay the course until their star returns.

Detroit Pistons (10-14) – Buyers

The Pistons are right where they want to be.

Well, maybe not. But after years of mediocre teams and 8th-seed finishes, seeing Detroit a handful of games under .500 and in the 9th spot in the Eastern Conference feels like home.

Detroit is 10th in offensive rating and 16th in defensive rating. Those numbers usually mean postseason appearances, especially in the weaker conference. A five-game losing streak in mid-November slowed their progress, but the 6-4 mark since Nov. 22 in about what you’d expect them to be.

But Blake Griffin has not looked like Blake Griffin. Maybe it’s injury-related, maybe it’s age-related. But a player of his caliber – especially coming off his sneaky-great 2018-19 – should regain form.

Andre Drummond is still doing Andre Drummond things. And as we detailed in October, Derrick Rose looks better than he has in years – he’s averaging 16.1 and 5.8 in just under 24 minutes per game.

The Pistons are buyers because the track record shows they don’t embrace the tank — Exhibit A: the Blake Griffin trade —  and their age. Some middling teams prefer to bottom-out and rebuild. Detroit has proven their propensity to just hang around, winning 38-42 games each year before getting trounced in the postseason. That’s admirable; it’s hard to win games in the NBA. Trying to do so, even with moderate success, isn’t a bad thing.

Detroit’s top scorers are Griffin (30), Rose (31), Drummond (26), Luke Kennard (23), Markieff Morris (30) and Langston Galloway (24). Kennard has been pretty good, but Galloway isn’t inspiring fear in anybody. Drummond, still relatively young, cannot be a A or B option as a scorer. Detroit went after the now 30-year-old Griffin a few years ago and Rose this past summer. Those are win-now, stay-relevant moves and there isn’t a lot of flexibility there.

Accordingly, it wouldn’t surprise to see Detroit try and get a few players leading up to February. The only player they might try to unload is the currently-injured Reggie Jackson – although it’s hard to imagine who would want him.

Chicago Bulls (9-17) – Sellers

It’s been repeated for months now: The Bulls, 9-17 and 11th in the Eastern Conference, are a disappointment. They talked up the playoffs preseason only to fall victim to the same prey as they did last year. The injuries have been less (although Otto Porter Jr. has been out since Nov. 8 and Lauri Markkanen has dealt with an oblique injury), but it hasn’t translated to wins.

Chicago’s defense has improved – they’re up to 12th in defensive rating – but their offense continues to be bottom-barrel, currently 26th in the NBA. The two though-to-be stars in Zach LaVine and Lauri Markkanen have struggled; LaVine has been up (49 points and 13 threes in Charlotte on Nov. 23) and down (5 points on 2-for-11 against Detroit on Nov. 20) offensively and rough on defense. Elsewhere, Markkanen has been outright disappointing by managing just 14.5 points per on 39.3 from the field and 32.7 from three-point range.

There have been reported internal riffs, plus tons of questions about head coach Jim Boylen, his fit for the job and whether the players respond to him.

Even if it gets better for the Bulls, it’s unlikely it does so in a way meaningful enough to meet preseason expectations. Chicago should be looking to sell, whether it’s Kris Dunn or players higher on the totem pole. The front office may not want to hear it, but there’d be a market for both LaVine and Markkanen.

Whether they explore that market or not remains to be seen.

Cleveland Cavaliers (5-19) – Sellers

The Cavaliers aren’t good, but we all expected that. They’re 29th in offense and 28th in defense, and they’ve won just one of their last 15 games – including their current eight-game losing streak.

Collin Sexton looks similar to his rookie year, except now his three-point shooting is down. Cedi Osman and Jordan Clarkson are both shooting 41 percent. Darius Garland is shooting 37.9 from the field, and leads the team with a putrid 2.8 assists per game.

That clip also shows us the reason the Cavaliers are maybe the biggest sellers of the trade period: Kevin Love.

Love’s numbers are down across the board. He’s averaging 15.7 and 10.5 rebounds per game on 43.8 percent from the field and 35.4 from three. Much of that can be explained by playing on a wholly uncompetitive team – other franchises want Love, a proven championship commodity who rebounds and stretches the floor.

Jason Lloyd of The Athletic reported today that Cleveland was seeking a first-round pick in exchange for Love. Lloyd also mentioned the problem with Love: He’s more expensive than Oklahoma City’s Danilo Galinari, but the latter is on an expiring deal.

Still, Love is a valuable player, and somebody that contenders will jump at once the deadline nears and executives are pressed to make a move. Portland has long been tied to the forward, but their standing in the Western Conference will factor into their willingness to take him on.

Regardless, it would be shocking (and almost implausible) to see Kevin Love in Cleveland past Feb. 6.

December is a big month for basketball – the Christmas day games are the most-watched regular season event on the NBA’s calendar. But something even more important than those matchups is only three days away, when much of the league becomes trade eligible.

Dec. 15 starts the race to Feb. 6. By then, we’ll know exactly who teams are as we look ahead to another NBA postseason.

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