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NBA Trade Watch: The Southwest

Shane Rhodes breaks down the mindset of each Southwest team headed toward the deadline.

Shane Rhodes

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New Years may have come and gone, but Trade Season is still very young. In fact, the NBA sits under a month away from the February 9th trade deadline. One of the most exciting times of the season, the trade deadline presents the opportunity for teams to improve both in the immediate and or distant future whether they are acquiring talent or accumulating future draft compensation.

In the lead up to the deadline, Basketball Insiders will tackle each division and break down where each team can improve or any trade chips they may have; Dennis Chambers has already covered the Atlantic Division here. While there doesn’t appear to be any major moves or changes on the horizon, the NBA never sleeps and that could change at a moments notice.

Here is a breakdown of the Southwest Division.

Houston Rockets (28-11)

The Rockets sure have fallen on hard times in recent weeks.

Houston has lost seven of their last 10 games, nine of which were played without superstar guard James Harden. Thanks to a dominant early season, the Rockets still sit comfortably at the two-spot in the Western Conference, but the San Antonio Spurs, Minnesota Timberwolves and others are all quickly gaining ground on them. And if they want any chance to catch the reigning champion Golden State Warriors in the standings, the Rockets are going to have to right the ship and do so quickly.

Notable Ending Contracts:

Chris Paul — $24,599,495

Trevor Ariza — $7,420,912

Clint Capela — $2,334,528

Names Worth Talking About:

The Rockets roster is already a fleshed out one; despite their recent struggles, they boast a top-shelf offense and, at the very least, an average defense. However, looking ahead, Houston’s top priority should be retaining talents Chris Paul and Clint Capela.

When healthy, Paul has been his usual dominant self and has formed one of the most dynamic backcourts in the NBA when alongside Harden. Capela, meanwhile, is in the midst of a breakout season for the Rockets and, at just 23-years-old, should continue to develop into an impact player on the floor. It would behoove the Rockets to maintain both their services.

Biggest Area of Need at the Deadline:

The Rockets don’t need much outside of the return of James Harden. They have already fortified their bench with Gerald Green, who has provided Houston with a major spark off the bench in Harden’s absence. Leading up to the deadline, the Rockets should be focused on maintaining the health of the players and trying to lock down the likes of Paul and Capela for the future.

San Antonio Spurs (28-14)

Gregg Popovich has worked his magic again this season.

Despite Kawhi Leonard’s extended absence, the Spurs have managed to a 28-14 record this season, good for third in the Western Conference. LaMarcus Aldridge has rebounded from a poor showing last season, while the likes of Pau Gasol, Danny Green, Kyle Anderson and Rudy Gay have been key contributors for Popovich’s squad.

Notable Ending Contracts:

Tony Parker — $15,453,126

Names Worth Talking About:

Tony Parker is a free agent at season’s end. Outside of the veteran guard, the Spurs don’t have much in the way of trade assets outside of draft compensation. The Spurs don’t look poised to make any big splashes as the deadline draws near; unless it’s swapping bench pieces, don’t expect much from San Antonio.

Biggest Area of Need at the Deadline:

Health. If the Spurs want to remain in contention they are going to need to return some players to the starting lineup. Most notably, Leonard, who has played just eight games this season, would be a welcome addition to a team that needs a reliable scoring option outside of Aldridge. The Spurs currently rank 26th in the NBA in points per game, averaging just 101.6 per contest; Leonard’s return would certainly remedy that situation.

New Orleans Pelicans (20-19)

As they seem to be every season, the New Orleans Pelicans are at a crossroads. Despite their talented frontcourt pairing of DeMarcus Cousins and Anthony Davis, New Orleans sits at just 20-19, good for eighth in the Western Conference; do they forge on ahead or finally hit the button and blow it all up?

Notable Ending Contracts:

DeMarcus Cousins — $18,063,850

Rajon Rondo — $3,300,000

Names Worth Talking About:

While the Pelicans are likely reluctant to trade their second-star, Cousins, it may be in their best interest to do so. Now in his eighth season, Cousins has never been to the playoffs; does he believe the Pelicans — currently the eighth seed in the West — stand a chance to go anywhere against the top teams in the Conference? New Orleans retaining Cousins beyond this season will come down to that, and if they are unable to make any headway out West the team should, at the very least, be taking calls on the All-Star center.

E’Twaun Moore and Rajon Rondo could be interesting pieces as well. Moore is having a career year and could provide a scoring spark to a team either off the bench or in the starting lineup. Rondo, meanwhile, is an experienced veteran, and if his two postseason games against the Boston Celtics are anything to go by, Playoff Rondo can still make a major impact. Both players could be nice chips for the Pelicans should they look to retool or reallocate some assets heading into the deadline.

Solomon Hill, who has missed the entire season to this point with a torn hamstring, is on the verge of returning. He could make an impact for New Orleans as well.

Biggest Area of Need at the Deadline:

Defense may be the missing ingredient in the recipe that is the Pelicans success.

The Pelicans have the makings of an elite offensive team in place despite bucking the traditional trend and rolling with two star big-men — they currently rank sixth in offensive rating, fourth in points per game and second in assists per game — but New Orleans has been unable to put forth the same effort on the defensive end. That needs to change if they want to stay out of the Western Conference cellar and move up and out of the eighth spot.

Keeping Anthony Davis should be a priority as well, through the deadline and for the remainder of the season.

Dallas Mavericks (14-28)

Another year, another down season for the Dallas Mavericks. But down might be where the Mavericks want to be right about now.

While no franchise wants to be losing games, the fact that the Mavericks are so low in the standings provides them with the prime opportunity to add a major impact talent in the stacked 2018 Draft. For a team lacking talent as much as the Mavericks do, it’s almost the perfect scenario to add to build a core for the future.

Notable Ending Contracts:

Nerlens Noel — $4,187,599

Seth Curry — $3,028,410

Yogi Ferrell — $1,312,611

Names Worth Talking About:

The Mavericks won’t be competing anytime soon, but they certainly have some intriguing pieces they can move for assets; Wesley Matthews, Nerlens Noel, Devin Harris and others, veterans who could surely be made use of by contenders. Matthews is one of the more underrated players in the NBA while Noel is a young talent who has simply fallen out of Rick Carlisle rotation and could do with a change of scenery. Devin Harris could certainly provide some experience and knowledge for a younger team while off the bench as well.

Seth Curry and Yogi Ferrell present as two intriguing pieces as well; they certainly are good enough, when healthy, to provide some offense off the bench and could definitely bring in some return should the Mavericks elect to move them.

Biggest Area of Need at the Deadline:

The Mavericks need assets, and they need them badly.

The team has experienced a long fall since its title run in 2011 and numerous on-the-fly retoolings have done little to keep the franchise afloat. As much as Mark Cuban wants Dirk Nowitzki to go out on a winning squad, there isn’t much he can do at this point; the Mavericks are just too lacking in talent. They need to break it all down and build a core through the draft and, while they are certainly on their way with Smith Jr. and Barnes, they still have a long way to go.

Memphis Grizzlies (12-27)

In the absence of Mike Conley, the Memphis Grizzlies have had a horrid stretch. Conley’s absence has coincided with a 5-23 stretch after a promising 6-3 start to the season, and things don’t appear as if they will be turning around in the near future. With Conley on the shelf for an extended period of time, Memphis’ best course may be the one no franchise wants to face; it may be time to cut their losses and rebuild.

Notable Ending Contracts:

Tyreke Evans — $3,290,000

Names Worth Talking About:

Marc Gasol will likely be an oft-mentioned name in the rumor mill, but it will probably take a larger-than-life offer to pry away the face of the franchise.

Rumors have swirled around Gasol for much of the season and they will continue to do so. Memphis’ poor performance certainly hasn’t helped but, with Conley on the shelf, Gasol is the team and that puts the Grizzlies in a terrible position. Memphis truly should consider shipping out Gasol; they desperately need the return he would bring in now in order to jumpstart a rebuild. The longer they wait, the lower the return will be. But what kind of message are they sending to their fan base should they simply admit defeat and subjugate them to potentially multiple years of irrelevancy? It is almost an impossible situation.

Tyreke Evans should be a hot commodity as well, and one much easier to move on from. The Sixth Man of The Year candidate has had the best season of his career and, most importantly, has maintained his health up to this point. Evans will almost certainly net the Grizzlies a first rounder, if not more, from a contender looking to add some scoring punch to their second unit. Signed to a one-year deal in the offseason and playing for a team going nowhere fast, there is no reason for the Grizzlies not to trade Evans.

Biggest Area of Need at the Deadline:

Like the Mavericks, the Grizzlies need draft assets and they need them badly.

Regardless of their decision on Gasol, Memphis is in a position where they must accumulate some talent through the draft after whiffing on multiple first-rounders in recent years. If the season keeps going as is, it shouldn’t be too difficult to get a top-level prospect with their own selection, but every extra pick is just another chance for Memphis to add to their depth and to a talent pool that is looking very thin at the moment.

In the event that they do move Gasol, taking on salary to facilitate some trades and acquire some draft picks certainly wouldn’t be out of the question.

With the trade deadline getting closer with each passing day, rumors will continue to swirl while teams make moves to critique and perfect their rosters.

And Basketball Insiders will be here to break it all down.

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NBA Daily: Tyronn Lue is the Right Coach for the Clippers

Is Lue the right coach for the Los Angeles Clippers? David Yapkowitz thinks so.

David Yapkowitz

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When Doc Rivers was first hired by the Los Angeles Clippers in 2013, the expectation was that he would be the one to guide the franchise into respectability. A laughingstock of the NBA for pretty much their entire existence, marred by bad coaching, bad management and bad ownership, Rivers was supposed to help change all of that.
For the most part, he did.

Rivers arrived from the Boston Celtics with the 2008 championship, and he helped the Celtics regain their standing as one of the NBA’s elite teams. The Clippers were a perennial playoff contender under him and were even in the conversation for being a possible championship contender. The Lob City Clippers led by Chris Paul and Blake Griffin certainly were talked about as being a title contender, and this season’s group led by Kawhi Leonard and Paul George were definitely in the mix as well.

Not only did Rivers steady the team on the court though, but he was also a very steadying presence off the court. He guided the franchise through the Donald Sterling controversy and he was a positive voice for the team as they navigated the bubble and the ongoing charge for social reform in the country.

But when things go wrong with a team, the coach is usually the one who ends up taking the fall. While Rivers did bring the Clippers to a level of respectability the franchise has never known, his record was not without blemishes. Most notably was his team’s inability to close out playoff series’ after holding three games to one on advantages two separate occasions.

In 2015, the Clippers had a 3-1 lead over the Houston Rockets only to squander that lead and lose Game 7 on the road. In Game 6, their shots stopped falling and neither Paul nor Griffin could do anything to halt the Rockets onslaught.

This season, in an incredibly similar fashion, the Clippers choked away a 3-1 lead over the Denver Nuggets and ended up getting blown out the second half of Game 7. Just like before, the offense stalled multiple games and neither Leonard nor George could make a difference.

There were also questions about Rivers’ rotations and his seeming inability to adjust to his opponents. In the end, something had to change, and whether it’s right or wrong, the coach usually ends up taking the fall.

Enter Tyronn Lue. Lue, like Rivers, is also a former NBA player and has a great deal of respect around the league. He came up under Rivers, getting his first coaching experience as an assistant in Boston, and then following Rivers to the Clippers.

He ended up joining David Blatt’s staff in Cleveland in 2014, and when Blatt was fired in the middle of the 2015-16 season, Lue was promoted to head coach. In the playoffs that year, Lue guided the Cavaliers to victory in their first 10 playoff games. They reached the Finals where they famously came back from a 3-1 deficit against the 73-9 Golden State Warriors to win the franchise’s first championship.

The Cavaliers reached the Finals each full year of Lue’s tenure as head coach, but he was let go at the start of the 2018-19 season when the team started 0-6 after the departure of LeBron James.

In the 2019 offseason, Lue emerged as the leading candidate for the Los Angeles Lakers head coaching job, before he ultimately rejected the team’s offer. After rejoining Rivers in LA with the Clippers for a year, he once again emerged as a leading candidate for multiple head coaching positions this offseason before agreeing to terms with the Clippers.

Following the Clippers series loss to the Nuggets, many players openly talked about the team’s lack of chemistry and how that may have played a factor in the team’s postseason demise. Adding two-star players in Leonard and George was always going to be a challenge from a chemistry standpoint, and the Clippers might have secured the perfect man to step up to that challenge.

During his time in Cleveland, Lue was praised for his ability to manage a locker room that included James, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love. In Game 7 against the Warriors, Lue reportedly challenged James at halftime and ended up lighting a fire that propelled the Cavaliers to the championship.

Lue’s ability to deal with star egos isn’t just limited to his coaching tenure. During his playing days, Lue was a trusted teammate with the Los Angeles Lakers during a time when Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant weren’t seeing eye to eye. He also played with Michael Jordan during Jordan’s Washington Wizard days.

Now, he’ll be tasked with breaking through and leading the Clippers to a place where no Clipper team has ever been before. He’ll be expected to finish what Rivers was unable to accomplish and guide the Clippers to an NBA championship.

For one, he’ll have to change the Clippers offensive attack. This past season, the Clippers relied too much on an isolation heavy offense centered around Leonard and George. That style of play failed in the playoffs when after failing to adjust, the Clippers kept taking tough shot after tough shot while the Nuggets continued to run their offense and get good shots.

With the Cavaliers, Lue showed his ability to adjust his offense and work to his player’s strengths. In the 2018 Playoffs, Lue employed a series of off-ball screens involving Love and Kyle Korver with James reading the defense and making the correct read to whoever was in the best position to score.

When playing with James, the offense sometimes tends to stagnate with the other four players standing around and waiting for James to make his move. Lue was able to get the other players to maintain focus and keep them engaged when James had the ball in his hands. Look for him to try and do something similar for when either Leonard or George has the ball in their hands.

He’s already got a player on the roster in Landry Shamet who can play that Korver role as the designated shooter on the floor running through off-ball screens and getting open. Both Leonard and George have become efficient enough playmakers to be able to find open shooters and cutters. That has to be Lue’s first task to tweak the offense to find ways to keep the rest of the team engaged and active when their star players are holding the ball.

The defensive end is going to be something he’ll need to adjust as well. The Clippers have some of the absolute best individual defensive players in the league. Leonard is a two-time Defensive Player of the Year, George was a finalist for the award in 2019 and Patrick Beverley is a perennial All-Defensive Team selection.

When the team was locked in defensively this season, there wasn’t a team in the league that could score on them. The problem for them was they seemingly couldn’t stay engaged on the defensive end consistently enough. The other issue was Rivers’ inability to adjust his defense to his opponent. Against the Nuggets, Nikola Jokic had a field day whenever Montrez Harrell was guarding him.

Lue’s primary task will be to get this team to maintain their defensive intensity throughout the season, as well as recognize what matchups are and aren’t working. Both Ivica Zubac and JaMychal Green were more effective frontcourt defenders in the postseason than Harrell was. Look for Lue to play to his team’s strengths, as he always has, and to trot out a heavy dose of man-to-man defense.

Overall, Lue was the best hire available given the candidates. He’s got a strong rapport among star players. He’s made it to the finals multiple times and won a championship as a head coach. And he already has experience working with Leonard and George.

Given the potential free agent status of both Leonard and George in the near future, the Clippers have a relatively small window of championship contention. Lue was in a similar situation in Cleveland when James’ pending free agency in the summer of 2018 was also a factor. That time around, Lue delivered. He’ll be ready for this new challenge.

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NBA Daily: The Lakers’ Third Scorer Is By Committee

The Los Angeles Lakers have a whole unit of third scoring options – and that’s why they’re one win from an NBA Championship.

David Yapkowitz

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One of the biggest questions surrounding the Los Angeles Lakers once the NBA bubble began was who was going to pick up the mantle of being the third scoring option.

Even before the 2019-20 season began, it was obvious that LeBron James and Anthony Davis would be the primary offensive weapons, but every elite team with championship aspirations needs another player or two they can rely on to contribute on the offensive end consistently.

The obvious choice was Kyle Kuzma. In his third year in the NBA, Kuzma was the lone member of the Lakers’ young core that hadn’t been shipped elsewhere. His name had come up in trade rumors as possibly being included in the package to New Orleans for Davis, but the Lakers were able to hang on to him. He put up 17.4 points per game over his first two seasons and had some questioning whether or not he had All-Star potential.

For the most part this season, he settled into that role for much of this season. With Davis in the fold and coming off the bench, his shot attempts dropped from 15.5 to 11.0, but he still managed to be the team’s third scorer with 12.8 points per game.

But here in the bubble, and especially in the playoffs, the Lakers’ role players have each taken turns in playing the supporting role to James and Davis. Everyone from Kuzma to Alex Caruso, to Dwight Howard, to Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, to Markieff Morris and even Rajon Rondo have had games where they’ve given the team that additional scoring boost.

Earlier in the bubble, James himself said they need Kuzma to be the team’s third-best player to win, but Kuzma himself believes that it’s always been by committee.

“We don’t have a third scorer, that’s not how our offense is built. Our offense is really AD and Bron, and everyone else plays team basketball,” Kuzma said on a postgame media call after Game 4 of the Finals. “We’ve had a long season, hopefully by now, you’ve seen how we play. Everyone steps up at different times, that’s what a team does.”

On this particular night, when the Miami HEAT got a pregame boost with the return of Bam Adebayo and wealth of confidence from their Game 3 win, it was Caldwell-Pope who stepped up and assumed the mantle of that third scoring option.

He finished Game 4 with 15 points on 50 percent shooting from the field and 37.5 percent from three-point range. He also dished out five assists and grabbed three rebounds. Perhaps his most crucial moments of the game came late in the fourth quarter with the Lakers desperately clinging to a slim lead and the Heat not going away.

He hit a big three-pointer in front of the Miami bench with 2:58 to go in the game, and then followed that up with a drive the rim and finish on the very next possession to give the Lakers some breathing room.

Caldwell-Pope has been one of the most consistent Lakers this postseason and he’s been one of their most consistent three-point threats at 38.5 percent on 5.3 attempts. He was actually struggling a bit with his outside shot before this game, but he always stayed ready.

“My teammates lean on me to pick up the energy on the defensive end and also make shots on the offensive end…I stayed within a rhythm, within myself and just played,” Caldwell-Pope said after the game. “You’re not going to knock down every shot you shoot, but just staying with that flow…Try to stay in the rhythm, that’s what I do. I try not to worry about it if I’m not getting shots. I know they are eventually going to come.”

Also giving the Lakers a big offensive boost in Game 4 was Caruso who had a couple of easy baskets at the rim and knocked down a three-pointer. He’s become one the Lakers best off the ball threats as well, making strong cuts to the rim or drifting to the open spot on the three-point line.

He’s had his share of games this postseason when it’s been his turn to step up as the Lakers additional scoring threat. During Game 4 against the Houston Rockets in the second round, Caruso dropped 16 points off the bench to help prevent the Rockets from tying the series up. In the closeout Game 6 of the Western Conference Finals against the Denver Nuggets, he had 11 points and finished the game in crunch time.

For him, it’s about staying ready and knowing that the ball is eventually going to come to whoever is open. When that happens, it’s up to the role players to take that pressure off James and Davis.

“Our third star or best player is whoever has the open shot. We know what AD and LeBron are going to bring to the table every night. They’re going to get their attention, they’re going to get their shots,” Caruso said after the game.

“It’s just about being ready to shoot. We have two of the best passers in the game, if not the best, so we know when we are open, we are going to get the ball. We have to be ready to do our job as soon as the ball gets to us.”

And if the Lakers are to close out the series and win the 2020 NBA championship, head coach Frank Vogel knows that it’s going to take a collective effort from the rest of the team, the way they’ve been stepping up all postseason.

“We need everybody to participate and contribute, and we’re a team-first team,” Vogel said after the game. “Obviously we have our two big horses, but everybody’s got to contribute that’s out there.”

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NBA Daily: Alex Caruso: The Lakers’ Unsung Hero

The Los Angeles Lakers are two wins from an NBA championship and Alex Caruso is just happy to play his role and contribute.

David Yapkowitz

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Alex Caruso has technically been an NBA player for three years now, but this season is his first on a regular NBA contract.

After going undrafted out of Texas A&M in 2016, he began his professional career as with the Philadelphia 76ers in summer league. He managed to make it to training camp with the Oklahoma City Thunder but was eventually cut and acquired by their the G League team, the Blue.

In the summer of 2017, he joined the Los Angeles Lakers for summer league, and he’s stuck with the team ever since. A strong performance in Las Vegas earned him the opportunity to sign a two-way contract with the Lakers for the 2017-18 season, meaning he’d spend most of his time with the South Bay Lakers in the G League.

The Lakers re-signed him to another two-way contract before the 2018-19 season. Restricted to only 45 days with the Lakers under his two-way contracts, Caruso played in a total of 62 games over those two years.

It wasn’t until the summer of 2019 that the Lakers finally signed him to a standard NBA contract worth $5.5 million over two years. And he’s become a key player off the Lakers bench, especially in the playoffs.

Despite not getting much of an early opportunity, Caruso continued to put in the work in anticipation of when his number would finally be called. He always was confident that it would come.

“It’s been the story of my career, no matter what level I’m at, the more time I have on the court, the better I’ve gotten,” Caruso told reporters after the Lakers eliminated the Denver Nuggets. “I’ve been waiting for an opportunity, I was two years on two-ways…finally I played well enough to get a contract, and over the course of the year it’s the same thing, anytime I can get out there on the court, I get better.”

Caruso’s stats may not jump off the page, he put up 5.5 points per game this season on only 41.2 percent shooting from the field, 33.3 percent from three-point range, 1.9 assists and 1.9 rebounds, but his impact has gone far beyond statistics.

His playoff numbers are up slightly at 6.8 points on 43.6 percent shooting to go along with 2.9 assists and 2.3 rebounds, but he’s become an invaluable member of the team’s postseason run. The defensive intensity and energy he brings to the court have been instrumental in playoff wins.

In this postseason alone, he’s seen himself matched up defensively with Damian Lillard, James Harden, Russell Westbrook, and one of the bubble’s breakout stars in Jamal Murray. Each time, he hasn’t backed down from the challenge and has even provided solid man to man defense on each of them.

“Looking and diving into the basketball aspect, series by series, just finding different ways that I know I can be effective, watching past games against opponents, just knowing their tendencies,” Caruso said on a recent media call. “The defense and the effort thing is something I’m always going to have. You can see that in the regular season when I might be more excited on a stop or defensive play on somebody than the rest of the team in game 45 or 50 in the season.”

While his main contributions have been his defense and his hustle, he’s found ways to be effective on the offensive end as well. While not shooting particularly well from three-point range percentage-wise in the playoffs at only 26.9 percent, he’s hit some timely ones during Laker runs to either pull closer to their opponent or to blow the game open.

He’s also been able to get the rim off drives and get himself to the free-throw line, and he’s made strong cuts off the ball to free himself up for easy layups. Playing with the second unit, he’s played a lot of off-ball with Rajon Rondo as the main facilitator, or with LeBron James as the only starter on the floor.

“For me, I think it’s about being aggressive. At any time I can put pressure on the paint whether it’s to get to the rim to finish or to draw fouls or make the defense collapse and get open shots for teammates, that’s really an added benefit for us to have multiple guys out on the court,” Caruso said.

“So whenever I’m out there with Rondo or with LeBron, to not have the sole focus be on one of them to create offense for everybody, it makes us a lot more balanced.”

The trust that Lakers head coach Frank Vogel and the rest of the team have in Caruso has been evident this whole postseason. Perhaps no bigger moment came for him than in Game 6 against the Nuggets in the Western Conference Finals when Vogel left him on the court to close out the game.

He’s also become one of the team’s vocal leaders on the court during gameplay, on the sidelines in the huddle and the locker room. On a team with a lot of strong personalities, Caruso’s ascendance as a locker room leader is something that just comes naturally for him. It’s something he’s done his entire basketball career.

“Being vocal has always been easy for me. Outside of this team, I’ve usually been one of the leaders on the team, one of the best players on my team growing up at different levels of basketball. Being vocal is pretty natural for me,” Caruso said.

“I got the trust of my teammates, they understand what I’m talking about. I say what I need to say and it doesn’t fall on deaf ears. I’m really competitive and if there’s something I think needs to be said, I’m going to do it. I leave no stone unturned to get the job done.”

Now in the NBA Finals, as the Lakers seek to win their first championship since 2010 and No. 17 overall, Caruso has reprised his role as a defensive irritant and glue guy who makes winning plays. For the team to win this series, they need to continue to get timely contributions from him.

And with each step of the way, he’s just soaking it all up and is thrilled to be able to have this opportunity alongside some of the NBA’s best.

“It’s a journey I’ve been on my whole life just to get to this point. It’s really cool, I don’t know how to state it other than that,” Caruso said. “It’s just super cool for me to be able to have this experience. To play meaningful minutes and play well, and be on the court with LeBron in big-time moments.”

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