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NBA AM: Hawks Dilemma, To Rebuild Or Reload

The Atlanta Hawks have an important decision to make – to either rebuild or reload.

Lang Greene

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Over the past decade, the Atlanta Hawks are one of the few teams in the NBA that have maintained a level of remarkable consistency. Now, in today’s “all about the rings culture,” this won’t fit the popular narrative. This also won’t fit the popular mainstream media talking point which often portrays the Hawks as a hapless foil or insignificant player on the national level. But; the fact remains that the Hawks just concluded a season which resulted in their 10th consecutive trip to the playoffs.

Ten. Consecutive. Trips.

This isn’t to say, though, that those trips haven’t resulted in plenty of disappointments along the way. Skeptics will quickly point out only one Eastern Conference Finals appearance during the current streak. Others will point out the numerous embarrassing sweeps the team has endured over the past 10 trips to the playoffs.

However, in a league filled with teams that have been mired in a lifelong dependence on annual lottery ping pong balls, the Hawks’ ability to remain afloat despite multiple coaching changes, front office shakeups and All-Stars leaving should be viewed as a mark of honor if being viewed objectively. With this being said, even the most optimistic Hawks fan or apologist must admit the franchise is entering a pivotal offseason for their program.

Earlier this month, the team shook up their front office by reassigning former general manager Wes Wilcox to another high ranking role within the organization. The Hawks also announced Mike Budenholzer was relieved of his duties as president of basketball operations and would retain his role as head coach.

With the NBA draft and beginning of free agency a little over a month away, the Hawks are barreling toward a pivotal time for the franchise without firm player personnel decision making in place. To be fair, the team was also in this situation before the draft in 2012. They then hired current Pelicans executive Danny Ferry as president of basketball operations.

A hot topic among Hawks fans is whether the franchise should blow up its current core in order to rebuild, or continue retooling on the fly. The current list of reported candidates to replace Budenholzer and Wilcox seem to indicate ownership believes they’re only a few pieces of way from true title contention. Three of the prominent executive candidates that have been rumored to be in the mix all have championship-level pedigrees. Former Detroit Pistons president of basketball operations Joe Dumars won titles as a player and executive for the organization. Current Cleveland Cavaliers general manager David Griffin was at the helm of the team’s title run last season. Lastly, Golden State Warriors executive Travis Schlenk has served as the team’s assistant general manager during a very dominant streak for the organization.

As we’ve stated many times in this space, there are three ways to improve in the NBA – the draft, free agency and the trade market.

The top teams around the league all have a certain level of homegrown talent on the roster. The Warriors, for instance, drafted former league MVP Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green. All three have developed into All-Star level competitors.

While the Hawks have been able to maintain a level of consistency, their recent draft history hasn’t produced players with the same type of trajectory. In the past, the Hawks have been able to develop homegrown draft picks such as Al Horford and Jeff Teague into All-Star level performers. Both of those guys were critical in laying the foundation of the Hawks success you see today.

Point guard Dennis Schroder, drafted back in 2013, represents the best Hawks draft selection since Budenholzer arrived in Atlanta. Players such as Taurean Prince and DeAndre Bembry, to be fair, look promising, but will need a couple more seasons to truly develop and get a better understanding of their ceilings.

This creates a conundrum for the Hawks organization.

While the team waits for Schroder, Prince and Bembry to come into their own and shake off those growing pains, the team is still being expected to compete at the highest level in the Eastern Conference from its fan base. This is a tough space for a franchise to be in because a look around the league shows that a majority of elite teams with legit title aspirations heavily rely on players with six or more years of experience. From a free-agency standpoint, this summer is going to be critical for the Hawks.

All-Star forward Paul Millsap, 32, has lived up to every single cent of his last two contracts with the organization, and it has resulted in multiple All-Star appearances for the veteran. However, Millsap is on the wrong side of 30 and will be seeking to cash in on a contract expected to be valued at over 100 million this summer. Ever since the Ferry-Budenholzer era began, the Hawks have been reluctant to lock in guys on potentially cap crippling deals—especially guys that are aging.

However, failing to re-sign Millsap after losing Horford last summer would signal the beginning of a rebuild. Losing Horford was mitigated by the signing of free agent center Dwight Howard, but losing Millsap would likely signal the end of the team’s playoff streak unless the front office was able to pull a rabbit out of the hat similar to last summer.

The problem with trying to completely rebuild if you’re Atlanta is the lack of lottery picks in the arsenal to do it via the draft. The problem for the Hawks in free agency is the fact that Atlanta, while extremely popular with players as a living destination, hasn’t been known as a hotbed for players.

Over the past five years, All-Stars such as LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh, Dwyane Wade and LaMarcus Aldridge have all been unrestricted free agents at some point and the Hawks haven’t been able to secure a single meeting with any of them.

From a trade market standpoint, the team is at a disadvantage right now, as well. Arguably the team’s two biggest trade assets are headed to free agency—Millsap (unrestricted) and emerging guard Tim Hardaway, Jr.(restricted). Players such as Kent Bazemore and Dwight Howard have seen their respective market values decline after inking lucrative deals last summer.

So while some clamor for the Hawks to completely blow it up and others are content with rebuilding on the fly, it is important to know that, disappointments aside, this is a golden era for Atlanta Hawks basketball. Fan support is high and improving, the playoff appearances keep the team relevant and there is talent on the roster to compete on a nightly basis.

But the question that must be answered over the next few months is what direction ownership believe is best for the franchise. The NBA is a business. Playoff appearances and solid crowd attendance means a positive on return on investment for investors. Blowing it up and heading toward the draft lottery with the “hope’ of one day returning to a place where you already are would net an unfavorable short term hit to the team’s profit margin.

To rebuild or retool has been an ongoing topic for the past five seasons in Atlanta. Ultimately, ownership has to decide whether the team can truly take a few steps forward as currently constructed or whether the team has to take a couple steps back in the interim in order to move forward in the future.

Lang Greene is a senior NBA writer for Basketball Insiders and has covered the NBA for the last 10 seasons

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NBA

NBA Daily: Jaylen Hands Makes Good Showing at the NBA Combine

Jaylen Hands made a good showing at the NBA Combine by displaying his offensive skills and defensive intensity.

Jesse Blancarte

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UCLA has produced a few of the NBA’s top point guards over the last decade or so, including Russell Westbrook and Jrue Holiday. Jrue’s younger brother, Aaron Holiday, has declared for this year’s draft and is projected by several NBA insiders to be selected with a first-round pick (likely in the 20-30 range). But Aaron Holiday isn’t the only UCLA point guard who may end up taking his talents to the NBA this offseason. Jaylen Hands, who is still just 19 years old and finished his freshman season, has also entered his name into this year’s draft.

While Hands has entered his name into the draft and participated in the NBA Combine, he has not hired an agent, which preserves his ability to return to college (Hands has until June 11 to make a final decision). Considering Hands’ young age and raw skill set, he isn’t projected by many insiders to hear his name called on draft night. But he certainly helped his cause in the Combine, showcasing his offensive talents, the muscle he has added to his slight frame since the end of his freshman season and aggressiveness on defense.

Basketball Insiders spoke with Hands at the Combine about his development, going through the pre-draft process, competing against familiar faces and more.

“It’s crazy, it’s crazy because when we were younger, they said the exact thing: ‘You guys are going to see each other forever.’” Hands said when asked about competing against many of the same players over the years and now at the Combine. “And you don’t really believe what they’re saying. But now you go through high school, you’re a senior, All-Star activities and you go to the Combine, you see the same people. It’s crazy.”

Hands has a notable skill set but is a raw prospect that many believe would be better served spending another year in college. While Hands needs to continue filling out his frame, he did register decent measurements at the Combine in relation to a top guard prospect – Trae Young of Oklahoma. Hands weighed in at 1.2 lbs heavier than Young, and outmatched Young in height (with and without shoes), standing reach and wingspan. Ironically, Hands has the smallest hands of all players that participated in the Combine. While these measurements don’t mean that he is currently a comparable prospect to Young, they could address some concerns about his current physical profile and how it may ultimately translate to the NBA.

Hands proved himself to be a confident and aggressive player in his freshman season at UCLA – something that he believes has led to misconceptions about his game.

“I’m not a point guard,” Hands said when asked about what misconceptions people have about his game.

I wouldn’t say it’s common, like it’s the main thing. But I’ve heard that I shoot first or something like that. I just feel like I attack a lot. I think I attack a lot and I’m of size to being a [two guard], so I think some people get it misconstrued. I just think I’m attack first, set my teammates up, get what I get.”

Hands is clearly aware of the common perceptions and current shortcomings in his game, which is why he is working hard to improve his overall skill set and is testing the NBA waters to get feedback from teams.

“Before I came here, just being more steady working on my shot, making good reads out of the pick and roll, finishing.” Hands said when asked about what parts of his game he was working on before coming to the Combine.

Hands was asked to clarify what he believes is his best strength at this point. Hands didn’t hesitate and pointed toward his ability to make plays off the dribble.

“My best strength is getting in the paint. So I get in the paint and make plays,” Hands said.

Hands is also clearly aware of UCLA’s history of producing quality point guards and has a chance to one day develop into a quality guard at the NBA level. However, with Holiday heading to the NBA and no major competition for the starting point guard position at UCLA next season, it may benefit Hands to hold off on turning pro for at least another year.

Whether he stays at UCLA or commits to this year’s draft, there’s no doubt that Hands is going to keep pushing to develop into a quality NBA player.

“I want to be the best player I can in the league,” Hands said. “That’s my goal.”

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Mock Drafts

NBA Daily: 2018 60-Pick NBA Mock Draft – 5/22/18

The final 2018 NBA Draft order is set and Basketball Insiders’ publisher Steve Kyler offers up his latest 60-pick NBA Mock Draft.

Steve Kyler

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Lots of Draft Movement

With the draft order now set for the 2018 NBA Draft, there is some sense of how the draft might play out.

The buzz coming out of the NBA Draft Combine in Chicago is that a number of picks could be had in trade include all three of the top selections. Word is the initial asking price is very high and more of an indication to the San Antonio Spurs that if they do want to part with disgruntled star Kawhi Leonard, they are open for business.

It’s also worth noting that there is a growing sense that both the Sacramento Kings and Atlanta Hawk may be far higher on some of the domestic bigs in the draft more so than euro sensation Luka Dončić. Both teams are expected to take a long look at Dončić, so their views on him could change as we get closer to the draft, but for now, Dončić may go lower.

Here is the latest 60-Pick NBA Mock Draft, reflecting the final draft order and the latest buzz, rumors, and intel from in and around the NBA:

Dates To Know:

The NCAA requires all players wishing to maintain their college eligibility, without penalty, to withdraw from the NBA Draft by 11:59 pm on May 30. That is an NCAA mandated date, not related to anything involving the NBA, and that notice must be delivered in writing.

The NBA’s draft withdrawal date is June 11 by 5:00 pm ET. The NBA’s date allows a prospect to remain NBA draft eligible for future NBA drafts and is not related to any NCAA rule or date. There are ways for college players that did not accept benefits to return to college. However, they may be subject to NCAA penalties.

The 2018 NBA Draft is June 21.

The Pick Swaps:

The Cleveland Cavaliers are owed the Brooklyn Nets’ first-round pick as a result of the Kyrie Irving trade this past summer. The Brooklyn Nets traded several unprotected picks to Boston as part of the Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce trades in 2015.

The Philadelphia 76ers are owed the LA Lakers’ 2018 Draft pick, unprotected, as a result of the 2012 Steve Nash trade with the Suns. The Suns traded that pick to the 76ers as part of the Michael Carter-Williams three-team trade with the Milwaukee in 2015. The 76ers traded that pick to the Boston Celtics as part of the draft pick trade that became Markelle Fultz before the draft; it has 2 through 5 protections. This pick will convey.

The LA Clippers are owed the Detroit Pistons first-round pick in 2018 as a result of the Blake Griffin trade.

The Phoenix Suns are owed the Miami HEAT’s first-round pick as part of the Goran Dragic trade in 2015, it is top-seven protected and would convey to Phoenix based on the final NBA standings.

The Phoenix Suns were owed the Milwaukee Bucks’ first-round pick as part of the Eric Bledsoe trade. The pick would only convey if the Bucks pick landed between the 11th and 16th pick, which based on the final NBA standings did not convey. The Suns will now receive the Bucks 2019 first-round pick assuming it falls between the fourth and 16th pick.

The Atlanta Hawks are owed the Minnesota Timberwolves’ first-round pick as part of the Adreian Payne trade in 2015. The pick was lottery protected and would convey to Atlanta based on the final NBA standings.

The Minnesota Timberwolves are owed the Oklahoma City Thunder’s first-round pick as part of the Jazz/Wolves Ricky Rubio trade this past summer. The Jazz acquired the pick as part of the Thunder’s deal to obtain Enes Kanter in 2015. The pick was lottery protected and would convey based on the final NBA standings.

The Chicago Bulls are owed the New Orleans Pelicans first-round pick as a result of the Nikola Mirotic trade. The pick was top-five protected and based on the final NBA standings would convey

The LA Lakers are owed the Cleveland Cavaliers first-round pick as a result of Jordan Clarkson/Larry Nance Jr. trade. The pick was top-three protected and based on the final NBA standings would convey

The Brooklyn Nets are owed the Toronto Raptors’ first-round pick as part of the DeMarre Carroll salary dump trade this past summer. The pick was lottery protected and based on the final NBA standings would convey

The Atlanta Hawks are owed the Houston Rockets’ first-round pick as part of a three-team deal with the LA Clippers and Denver Nuggets involving Danilo Gallinari and taking back Jamal Crawford and Diamond Stone. The pick was top-three protected and based on the final NBA standings would convey

Check out the Basketball Insiders’ Top 100 NBA Draft Prospects – http://www.basketballinsiders.com/top-100-nba-draft-prospects/

More Twitter: Make sure you are following all of our guys on Twitter to ensure you are getting the very latest from our team: @stevekylerNBA, @LangGreene, @EricPincus, @joelbrigham, @TommyBeer, @MokeHamilton , @jblancartenba, @Ben_Dowsett, @SpinDavies, @JamesB_NBA, @DennisChambers_, @mike_yaffe, @MattJohnNBA, and @Ben__Nadeau .

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NBA Daily: Shamet Comfortable With Steady Self Going Into Draft

With a natural feel for the game, Wichita State guard Landry Shamet has more than enough of a chance to carve his own path of success in the NBA.

Spencer Davies

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No matter what professional field a person wants to work in, there are multiple ways to show why they belong.

A positive attitude is everything, confidence goes a long way and honesty truly is the best policy.

Speaking with Wichita State product Landry Shamet this past week at the NBA Combine in Chicago, it’s clear that he has all three of those boxes checked off.

“It’s been great,” Shamet said of the event. “Just trying to absorb everything, soak everything up. It’s a big learning experience for sure. A lot of knowledge to be attained (at the Combine). With interviews and playing on the court, being coached by NBA guys, it’s been cool so far.”

During his three years with the Shockers, the 6-foot-4, 188-pound guard accomplished quite a few feats, but his junior season was arguably the most spectacular. Not only did Shamet lead his team in multiple ways, but he also topped out in four statistical categories in the American Athletic Conference—the school’s first year there after moving on from the Missouri Valley.

Shamet’s 166 assists (5.2 per game average) were the most in the AAC by far. In addition, his true shooting percentage (65.5) and three-point percentage (44.2) ranked number one among his peers.

From entering the program in 2015 to now, he feels that he’s grown dramatically as a player—but in what areas, specifically?

“I would say being a point guard honestly,” Shamet said. “I was recruited in as a two. But just kinda that leadership role, that accountability. Knowing that you’re gonna get a lot of scrutiny (after) a loss and you’re gonna be responsible for a win. Regardless of how the game goes, it’s your responsibility.”

Much of his development at Wichita State was courtesy of a hands-on approach with Gregg Marshall, one of the most revered head coaches in college basketball. Thanks to his guidance, Shamet feels ready, even in aspects outside of his offensive ability.

“On the defensive end, I feel comfortable with my positioning,” Shamet said. “Obviously, need to get better. You can always get better on the defensive end. That’s one thing I’ve been focusing on. Trying to get more athletic. Just be better defensively. He gave me the groundwork for sure. 100 percent.”

Shamet has kept in touch with Marshall throughout the entire pre-draft process. He was told to “smile and relax” in interviews and to be confident, which he’s certainly followed through with.

A similar message has come from Ron Baker and Fred VanVleet, two former Shockers who have each made their mark at the professional level.

“Just be yourself, you know,” Shamet said of VanVleet’s pointers. “That’s really what it boils down to I think. He’s been great to have him in my corner—a guy like that who’s been through a lot of adversity on his way to the NBA, so I’m gonna listen to him 10 times out of 10.”

VanVleet’s career is already taking off with the Toronto Raptors as a part of their young and hungry bench. But with four more inches of height and a similar feel for the game, Shamet has more than enough of a chance to carve his own path of success in the NBA.

And it won’t require flash or making a daily highlight-reel to do so.

“I’d like to just say versatile,” Shamet said of his game. “Just try to stay solid. I don’t ever try to make spectacular plays all the time. Try to just do what I feel I can do—play multiple positions, both positions, on or off the ball. I’m comfortable at either spot, honestly. Whether it’s facilitating, scoring, whatever the case may be.

“I feel like I have a high IQ as well. Just a cerebral player. Not gonna ‘wow’ you with crossing people up and doing things that a lot of the guys in the limelight do all the time. But I feel like I’m a solid player. Pretty steady across the board.”

However, just because he rarely shows off on the court doesn’t mean he doesn’t have the ability to do it.

“I feel like I’m a little more athletic than I might get credit for,” Shamet said. “I think I’m a better athlete than I get credit for.”

Shamet is projected to go anywhere from the middle-to-late first round of the draft in June. Whoever lands the Kansas City native will be getting a tireless worker who does things the right way and is all about the team.

But for now, he’s soaking in everything he possibly can before that night comes.

“I don’t have all the answers,” Shamet candidly said. “I’m a 21-year-old kid, man I guess. So just trying to learn as much as I can, gain some knowledge, get good feedback—because at the end of the day, I’m not a perfect player. I know that.”

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