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NBA PM: Trade Deadline Winners and Losers

A look at the 2014 NBA trade deadline’s winners and losers … A recap of all of the day’s trades, including a shocking move by the Indiana Pacers

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There was no shortage of movement in the final hours of the 2014 NBA trade deadline, but overall the activity really lacked substance.

That was until the Indiana Pacers unleashed their latest power play in their quest to win the 2014 championship. Already equipped with one of the best teams in the league and a certified championship contender, the Pacers pulled off the biggest move of the deadline to put themselves in the winners category. We take a look at who joins them in that class, along with who didn’t do so well at the deadline.

Winners

Indiana Pacers – By all accounts it looked like the Pacers were going to rest on their laurels, go into the second half of the season with what they already had. They made a big splash a couple of weeks ago by signing Andrew Bynum and they were openly shopping Danny Granger, but they had a really specific criteria of what they were looking for in return. And everything lined up perfectly for them to get just what they wanted from the Philadelphia 76ers in Evan Turner and Lavoy Allen. The Pacers also gave up a second-round pick in the deal.

The Pacers are heading into the summer with lots of uncertainty surrounding their ability to retain Lance Stephenson. By acquiring Turner, who they can make a restricted free agent with a qualifying offer, the Pacers position themselves to not be left with a gaping hole at the shooting guard position in the case of his departure.

In Turner, they also add an effective scorer and playmaker to help solidify their second unit. He has the motivation of playing for a new contract and should continue to play inspired basketball for the Pacers as he was with the 76ers, although his role will change somewhat drastically. Not only did the Pacers liven up what was a pretty underwhelming deadline, they also improved their chances at the championship.

Washington Wizards – The Wizards were hurting at the backup point guard position and had their eyes set on Miller for weeks. After multiple attempts to pry him away from Denver, thanks to the help of the Philadelphia 76ers, they were finally able to land their target in a three-team deal. It only cost them a second-round pick, Eric Maynor and Jan Vesely as well – a small price when you factor in that the Wizards were unlikely to be his top choice had he been waived by the Nuggets as expected after the deadline if they couldn’t find a deal. Miller will provide some much needed stability when Wall needs a rest, and even be able to play with him for stretches. Where he’ll help the most, though, is when he’s running the show with the second unit, where he’ll elevate everyone’s level of play with his ability to create.

Golden State Warriors – The Warriors made no secrets about their desire to improve their second unit in the weeks leading up to the deadline and last night they were able to acquire a piece in Steve Blake who will really help improve their bench. Blake is a steal for the Warriors as he’ll come in and provide three-point shooting, experience and toughness. He’s spent the majority of the time playing off the ball this season, making him a good fit next to Jordan Crawford when they come in for Klay Thompson and Stephen Curry. MarShon Brooks was never in their plans and Kent Bazemore, although a fan favorite, was expendable, especially for a proven veteran like Blake. At least with the Lakers, he’ll have the opportunity to prove himself a bit more than he was able to with the Warriors.

Losers

New York Knicks – The Knicks worked the phone as hard as anyone during the trade deadline, desperately trying to land an upgrade at the point guard position. Ultimately, they were unable to do anything. For a moment it looked like they were going to be able to acquire Jordan Hamilton from the Nuggets in exchange for Beno Udrih, but ultimately the Houston Rockets intervened by giving up Aaron Brooks, who the Nuggets liked more than Udrih, for Hamilton. The Knicks will now play out the final months of Carmelo Anthony’s contract with the same team they’ve had throughout this tumultuous season. Anthony wants to stay, but the trade deadline was another instance where the Knicks gave him reason to consider otherwise.

Los Angeles Lakers – When it looked like Steve Blake was the first shoe to drop in a series of moves to help the Lakers get under the luxury tax threshold and avoid the repeater tax, it was an understandable move. It still is, but the fact that the Lakers didn’t follow it up by actually getting under the tax makes them one of the clear cut losers. Holding onto Pau Gasol was the right move, especially since it doesn’t appear that there was anything significant being offered in exchange for him. He’ll be a valuable chip in potential sign-and-trade moves this offseason, but the Lakers had the opportunity to get under the tax threshold or at least within $2 million of it just by shipping off Jordan Hill to a team with a disabled players exception and they passed on it because they also wanted a second-round pick. When they’re paying the repeater tax, they’ll likely wonder why they bothered holding onto Hill and Kaman in this season that’s already lost.

Phoenix Suns – The Suns had the expiring contract of Emeka Okafor and four first-round picks to shop around for a piece that could help solidify their spot in the playoffs, yet they decided to stand pat at the deadline. First-year GM Ryan McDonough’s every move has been questioned so far and he deserves some credit and respect because up to this point the team has far and away exceeded expectations. This was an opportunity for him to make a splash and instead they stood pat. Okafor’s contract will simply expire now and they’ll likely end up moving at least one of their draft picks on draft night. Have to wonder, why weren’t they willing to give up at least one for Gasol? Not only was he a piece that could help them make some noise in the playoffs this year, he’s a quality pending free agent they actually could have re-signed at a decent rate.

Memphis Grizzlies – At one point it looked like the Grizzlies had a deal in place with the Minnesota Timberwolves that was going to send them Tayshaun Prince and Tony Allen , but it ultimately fell apart prior to the deadline. Not only were the Grizzlies unable to upgrade at small forward like they reportedly wanted to, but they have two players who know that they were almost dealt returning to the team. It’s going to be interesting to see if first-year head coach Dave Joerger can prevent that near trade from becoming an issue post-deadline. The Grizzlies are on the verge of cracking the Western Conference’s top eight, but will have to ride out the rest of the regular season with the squad that put them behind the pack.

Here’s a recap of all of the action from today’s trade deadline:

  • Sacramento Kings trade Marcus Thornton to the Brooklyn Nets for Jason Terry and Reggie Evans.
  • Los Angeles Lakers trade Steve Blake to the Golden State Warriors for Kent Bazemore and MarShon Brooks.
  • Philadelphia 76ers trade Spencer Hawes to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Earl Clark, Henry Sims and two second-round picks.
  • Denver Nuggets trade Andre Miller to the Washington Wizards. Wizards trade Eric Maynor and a second-round pick to the Philadelphia 76ers and Jan Vesely to the Nuggets.
  • Miami HEAT trade Roger Mason Jr. and cash to the Sacramento Kings for a heavily protected second-round pick.
  • Charlotte Bobcats trade Ramon Sessions and Jeff Adrien to the Milwaukee Bucks for Luke Ridnour and Gary Neal.
  • Houston Rockets trade Aaron Brooks to the Denver Nuggets for Jordan Hamilton.
  • San Antonio Spurs trade Nande De Colo to the Toronto Raptors for Austin Daye.
  • Los Angeles Clippers trade Antawn Jamison to the Atlanta Hawks for the draft rights of Cenk Akyol.
  • Indiana Pacers trade Danny Granger to the Philadelphia 76ers for Evan Turner and Lavoy Allen.

Yannis Koutroupis is Basketball Insiders' Managing Site Editor and Senior Writer. He has been covering the NBA and NCAA for seven years.

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Now What? – Washington Wizards

Washington Wizards’ GM Tommy Sheppard acknowledged: “this is not a run-it-back team.” As they work to convince Bradley Beal to stay long-term, Bobby Krivitsky examines their path to being a better-balanced team while assessing the state of the franchise.

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After losing to the Philadelphia 76ers in five games in the first round of the playoffs, the Washington Wizards have to get creative to evolve into a more balanced team better equipped to compete in the postseason.

Washington’s offensive attack is potent. Led by Bradley Beal, who ranked second in points per game, producing 31.3 per contest, the Wizards generated 116.6 per game, the third-most in the league. 

That stems from Washington leading the NBA in pace, averaging 104.67 possessions per contest. Then, there’s the nature of those possessions, which often resulted in Beal or Russell Westbrook scoring in the paint, where the Wizards manufactured 52.8 points per game from, which was the fifth-most league-wide. Those drives often lead to free throws as well. Washington took 26.2 free throws per contest, converting 20.1 of them, both of which led the NBA.

But as lethal as the Wizards’ offense was this season, moving forward, they should grow into a unit that does more damage from beyond the arc. They averaged 29 three-point attempts per game, marginally better than the league-low launched by the San Antonio Spurs (28.4). Thus, it’s not surprising they ranked 28th in threes made per game (10.2), a few ticks better than the 9.9 produced by the Spurs, who again found themselves at the bottom of a long-range category.

As a result of Washington’s struggles from three-point range, they ranked 20th in effective field goal percentage (53.1 percent) and 18th in true shooting percentage (56.9 percent). That’s where the Wizards felt the impact of Thomas Bryant’s absence. He isn’t a high-volume shooter, but in 2019-20, he took two threes per game and knocked down 40.7 percent of them. In the 10 games he played this season before tearing his ACL, he made 42.9 of his 2.1 long-range attempts. Bryant will be nine months removed from his injury when training camp starts, so he may not be ready for the beginning of the 2021-22 campaign. 

Either way, Robin Lopez and Alex Len are free agents this offseason, meaning Washington needs to re-sign at least one of them or acquire another center. However, unlike the Wizards’ search for help on the wings, adding a center who spaces the floor like Bryant isn’t a prerequisite.

One way Washington overcomes its lack of long-range scoring is by forcing and capitalizing on turnovers. The Wizards rank 10th in opponent turnovers per game (14.7), which led to an average of 18 points per contest, the eighth-most in the league. 

An area they couldn’t compensate for this season was their defensive shortcomings. Washington gave up the most points per game (118.5), and Opponents made an average of 43.1 field goals per contest, placing the Wizards 28th in that category. They ranked 20th in defensive rating, yielding 112.3 points per 100 possessions. As a result, they had a -1.6 net rating, which was 22nd in the league.

Despite the Wizards’ ability to generate turnovers, it failed to mask the reality that they provide little resistance defensively. Opponents produced 13.7 second-chance points per game against them, the seventh-most in the league. The Wizards ranked 18th in points allowed in the paint, surrendering 48.2 per game. And their efforts to create turnovers tended to result in them racking up fouls and sending their opposition to the free-throw line. Teams took 25.4 foul shots per contest against Washington, which ranked a tick below the league-high opponents averaged against the Golden State Warriors (25.4).

Speaking of turnovers, the Wizards coughed up the ball an average of 14.4 times per game, which ranked 20th and led to opponents scoring 17.6 points off those mistakes, the fourth-most in the NBA this season.

Those defensive struggles and the Wizards’ imbalance are why they can’t simply run it back next season, relying on internal improvement to turn them into a more formidable playoff opponent than the one that recently got bounced after five games in the first round.

“This is not a run-it-back team,” Wizards’ general manager Tommy Sheppard acknowledged following the conclusion of their season. “We have to get better. So, to do that, you have to run it better. You have to build. You have to improve. And we’re going to do everything possible, look at every option that we can to make that happen.”

However, that won’t be easy. Washington will enter free agency over the cap. The Wizards will have the mid-level and biannual exceptions to help them fortify their roster. The former could be the key to them adding a stout perimeter defender, ideally, one who fits the description of a three-and-D wing. The latter of those exceptions might be how Washington acquires a center to pair with Bryant and Daniel Gafford. 

As for the draft, the Wizards have the 15th pick in the first round, which isn’t ideal, but it’s the price for making the playoffs. Still, at the 2015 draft, they acquired Kelly Oubre Jr., who was the 15th selection that year. Opting to take the best player available is a strategy that should never get knocked, but with Washington prioritizing the present, gravitating towards an NBA-ready wing or at least the prospect they consider the best remaining at that position would align with what’s taking precedence.

The Wizards also have to decide whether to bring back head coach Scott Brooks, who is no longer under contract. During Sheppard’s exit interview, he said Brooks “did a hell of a job keeping this team together through some of the most difficult, dark moments probably in franchise history.” In January, the Wizards dealt with a COVID-19 outbreak that suspended their season for two weeks.

Westbrook strongly expressed support for bringing Brooks back, which isn’t surprising, considering how well the two of them get along, dating back to their time together with the Oklahoma City Thunder. 

“Me personally, I don’t see why Scottie should go anywhere. And not just because we’re close, but he’s done a hell of a job with our team, our program since I’ve been here. …“He’s still the same coach Brooks, and he brings intensity. He brings the effort like he was playing, but he’s a coach. That’s something you can’t teach. That’s something you can’t have. So, if it was up to me, I don’t think he should go anywhere.”

Lastly, there’s the threat Beal asks out this summer; don’t mistake that for a prediction, but he has one year left on his contract plus a player option worth $37.3 million for the 2022-23 season. As loyal as he is, and as enjoyable a season as it was for the Wizards, they got easily dispatched by the Sixers in the first round of the playoffs, and their path to improvement is difficult, especially when it comes to vaulting themselves into title contention. Perhaps Beal, a three-time All-Star, decides it’s in his best interest to join a team better-suited to compete for the Larry O’Brien trophy next season, especially after adding him to its roster. Making that decision now would also allow Washington to get a package of players and picks in return for obliging with his request, rather than risking losing him for nothing next offseason.

Beal loves where he is, and his first choice is to win with the Wizards. But like Shepard said: “this is not a run-it-back team;” they have to improve the roster to help convince Beal there’s no need for him to take his talents elsewhere.

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Now What? – Indiana Pacers

Following a disappointing season, the Indiana Pacers have more questions than answers as of right now. Chad Smith details what changes may be on the horizon for the team this summer as they figure out which direction they are heading.

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Basketball Insiders continues the “Now What” series with a look at the Indiana Pacers. A disappointing 34-38 record earned them a spot in the Play-In Tournament, where they crushed the Charlotte Hornets but were then destroyed by the Washington Wizards. They limped across the finish line, and now face an uncertain offseason that could be filled with changes.

Following a wild roller-coaster season, the Pacers find themselves at a crossroads. Expectations were high for the team coming into this season, with a new head coach and a rejuvenated roster. Early in the season things were rolling along nicely, but the Pacers were ultimately victims of the injury bug amid the condensed season. For just the second time in the last decade, they will be a lottery team heading into the 2021 NBA Draft.

The primary focus for the front office, like last year, will be finding their next coach. The team announced on Wednesday that Nate Bjorkgren would not be returning next season. After taking a chance on the first-year head coach, the tumultuous season ultimately led the organization to look for a coach with more experience.

There are plenty of other riddles to solve, both in the draft and in free agency. There are decisions to be made regarding this roster, and none of them can be considered minor at this point. Indiana is swimming in the river of mediocrity, and that must change.

The future for this team has been cloudy but getting answers to several questions this offseason will help clear things up.

Strengths

For all of the uncertainty surrounding the Pacers, they do have some good things going for them. After jumping at the opportunity to land a young talented player like Caris LeVert, they had to wait on his recovery following treatment for the mass that was found on his kidney. His return to the floor in March was a wonderful sight to see, and the fit alongside his new teammates has been harmonious.

LeVert was thriving as a member of the Pacers, but it was cut short just before the Play-In Tournament began when he was forced to sit out due to health and safety protocols. Despite his absence, LeVert has solidified himself as the guy on this team that can create for others, as well as get his own shot whenever they need it.

When they don’t need to take that route, the Pacers are perfectly fine with running their offense through Domantas Sabonis. The big man had a career year, serving as the engine of the team’s offense. Sabonis averaged career highs in points (20.3), assists (6.7), steals (1.2) and blocks (0.5) this season. He also pulled down 12 rebounds per game and got to the free-throw line more than he ever has during his five-year career.

Just getting their full complement of players back healthy is something this organization can feel good about. With TJ Warren essentially missing the entire season and Myles Turner having his impressive season cut short due to injuries, the Pacers will only improve with them back in the fold. Jeremy Lamb missed half the season, Malcolm Brogdon missed 16 games and Sabonis missed ten due to injuries as well.

Indiana’s offense should be one of the most dynamic in the league next year, with LeVert, Sabonis, and Brogdon leading the way. The other players on this roster will need to play their roles, hit open shots, and defend. If those needs can be addressed this offseason, the Pacers should be back in the playoffs next year.

Weaknesses

The injuries may have done them in towards the end of the season, but what really killed the Pacers was their inability to defend, rebound and close out games. They had the fourth-worst rebounding differential (-4.1) during the season and blew 17 fourth-quarter leads. Those two ingredients are a recipe for disaster.

The biggest question surrounding Indiana’s offseason was answered earlier this week. Kevin Pritchard met with Bjorkgren on Tuesday and decided that it was time to move on. He acknowledged that they took a chance last season and it just didn’t pan out. He also addressed what he is looking for in their next leader.

The real question is how much of the blame for this turbulent season should be on Bjorkgren’s shoulders? He didn’t have Warren, Turner, LeVert, Oladipo, or Lamb for most of the season. He was reluctant to play Aaron Holiday for whatever reason and relied heavily on the defense and availability of Justin Holiday and TJ McConnell. Despite all of this, he still had this team one win away from the playoffs.

Brogdon and Sabonis both thrived in Bjorkgren’s offense. Brogdon averaged a career-high in scoring while the team averaged a franchise record 115.3 points per game. It was a massive leap from the old, slow-tempo offense that they ran under former coach Nate McMillan. In the end, the disconnect between the players and others within the organization was too much to ignore.

Indiana will have several candidates to choose from, including some they met with last summer. The front office will be looking at former player and current Los Angeles Clippers assistant Chauncey Billups, former Portland Trail Blazers coach and Indiana native Terry Stotts, as well as Mike D’Antoni, who was the favorite to get the job last season before joining Steve Nash’s staff in Brooklyn.

Opportunities

Indiana will have an opportunity to grab some high-end talent in the draft this summer. This will be just the second time they will have a lottery pick in the draft in the last ten years. The Pacers likely won’t land the cream of the crop with the 13th or 14th pick, but there is plenty of solid talent throughout this draft class.

One name that has come up frequently in mock drafts is Keon Johnson, who is a relentless wing defender. That has been a void ever since Victor Oladipo suffered his quad injury in January of 2019. Should the Pacers not bring back Doug McDermott, they could look at Corey Kispert from Gonzaga, who is an elite perimeter shooter. Other names to monitor are James Bouknight from UConn and Jared Butler from Baylor. The Pacers typically like to take the best talent available, regardless of position need.

In terms of free agency, the Pacers are already over the salary cap. Despite the lack of money to throw around, Pritchard has a solid reputation for finding bargain deals. There are several solid role players available that could potentially help this team next season. Under-the-radar guys like Dewayne Dedmon, Wayne Ellington and Tony Snell would be able to fill some of the weaknesses that the team had this past season.

The roster is in flux so while there isn’t one obvious position that they need to fill, it is safe to say they will be set at the starting center position with either Sabonis or Turner. Even with Warren coming back, there are questions with their wing players, so it would not be a surprise to see them chase someone like Torrey Craig. He could become a hot name when free agency begins, should the Phoenix Suns keep rolling in the playoffs. Regardless, that is the type of player that Indiana would desperately covet.

The silver lining with all of the Pacers’ injuries is what they found in their absence. Oshae Brissett played 21 games for Indiana this season, and he showed some serious potential. After the regular season, Brissett scored 31 points and pulled down ten rebounds against his former team, the Toronto Raptors. His range was on display as well, as he shot 42.3 percent from three-point range during the regular season.

Brissett was 10-14 overall from the floor in their Play-In Tournament victory over the Hornets, scoring 23 points to lead the way for the Pacers. He signed a three-year contract so the Pacers will have some flexibility at the position going forward.

Threats

Indiana’s only free agents are McConnell, McDermott and JaKarr Sampson. At first glance, there doesn’t seem to be much of a threat if they were not able to retain any of these guys. Both McConnell and McDermott had career seasons and showed their value to other potential suitors this summer. McConnell led the league in steals with 128, which is 20 more than Jimmy Butler, who finished second. The 29-year old also averaged career-high numbers across the board.

McDermott also posted the best statistical numbers of his career, improving in many areas of his game. Known mostly for his perimeter shot, the former Creighton star was a nightmare to chase as he weaved his way through screens and split down the lane for layups. After landing on his fifth team, it seemed as though he found the perfect fit in Indiana, but money always talks.

The Pacers can certainly replace their production should they decide to leave, but the most difficult roster decision has been a long time coming. It is the elephant in the room – Turner or Sabonis?

As Tristan Tucker recently pointed out, this frontcourt pairing has run its course. While Pritchard has reiterated that the two big men could stagger their minutes, it simply has not been working. The two-man lineup of Sabonis and Turner yielded a -2.3 net rating, which was the fourth-worst of the team’s top 15 pairings. The on/off ratings also revealed that the best option going forward is to split up the Turbonis experiment.

Both players have excelled on one side of the ball. Sabonis has fueled Indiana’s offense, posting ten triple-doubles this season. He also recorded 48 double-doubles in just 62 games. Turner was on pace to shatter the record for most blocks in a season before his injury derailed that plan. He still led the league in blocks per game (3.4) for the second time in the last three seasons.

For whatever reason, the numbers have not translated to team success. With both players under contract through at least the next two seasons, the time to trade one of them is now. It is a risky proposition, but one that the organization must make. The big question is which player should Indiana move? Sabonis will likely yield more of a return but he is also the more important piece for this roster as currently constructed.

All of that being said, many teams would love to get their hands on a floor-spacing center that protects the rim. Turner’s name was floated in several trade discussions before the season. One that nearly came to fruition was with the Boston Celtics, which was centered around Gordon Hayward. Many front offices have already set their sights on putting together a package for the 25-year old, with the Los Angeles Lakers high on the list of interested teams.

The last time Indiana drafted a player in the lottery was in 2015 when they selected Turner with the 11th pick. Oddly enough, he might be the one that is dealt to get this team out of mediocrity.

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Now What? – Minnesota Timberwolves

The Timberwolves are still a Western Conference bottom feeder, but Matt John explains why they should be more optimistic now than in past years.

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What’s up fellow basketball junkies? Have you enjoyed these NBA Playoffs? Well, so have we! Now that there will be fewer playoff games, it’s time for another installment of Basketball Insiders’ Now What? series. Over the past few weeks, we’ve looked over what the future holds for teams like Chicago and New Orleans. Today, we turn our attention to the Minnesota Timberwolves.

Coming into this season, the Timberwolves still hadn’t recovered from a previous era of much hype but minimal progress. When it was all over, their present remained mostly helpless. Miraculously, their future on the other hand looked promising. Again. And this time, we may not be left at the altar. With that, let’s begin.

Strengths

At first, when you see that, according to Basketball-Reference, Minnesota had the sixth-lowest offensive rating in the league this year – scoring 109.5 points per 100 possessions – you would think that it’s a bad thing. If you dig a little deeper, you’d see that the offense came along nicely as the season came down the home stretch.

Starting in March, the Timberwolves’ upped that rating to 112.9 points per 100 possessions, good for 13th overall in the league in that span. So what changed during that time? D’Angelo Russell’s return certainly helped, but that didn’t happen until April 5th. Nope, at the center of it was both the rise of Anthony Edwards and the hiring of Chris Finch.

Edwards exploded from March onward. From there until the end of the season, he averaged 23.6 points on 45/34/77 splits. Those are electrifying numbers for any player. The fact that it was a rookie should give the Timberwolves plenty of hope. Minnesota going 16-21 in that time isn’t good. Seeing how they only had 23 wins total, that shows unexpected promise.

And hey, speaking of Russell, once he came back, Minnesota’s offense vaulted even higher. They scored 114.8 points per 100 possessions once D-Lo returned. That didn’t push them higher than 13th among NBA teams, but going 11-11 in that time demonstrated even more progress.

The fact that this all came right around the time when Edwards began to put the league on notice makes it feel like it wasn’t a coincidence. And don’t you dare believe we’re forgetting about one Karl-Anthony Towns. We could talk about his numbers, but the ones he put up are what we expect from him at this point.

The best way to talk about his impact is to bring one final fun fact to the table: Towns, Russell, and Edwards played in only 24 games together. That three-man lineup posted a net rating of plus-4.9. That’s a solid net rating. Not a great one. Among other three-man lineups that played at least 300 minutes together, they didn’t even have the best one.  What should catch your eye is that, when they played together, Minnesota won 13 of those 24 games.

The development was subtle, but the Timberwolves offense progressed enough that fans should be ecstatic for what comes next season.

Weaknesses

Unfortunately, Minnesota’s offensive evolution did not make up for their shoddy defense. According to Basketball-Reference, the Timberwolves allowed 115 points per 100 possessions this past season. That made for the third-lowest defensive rating in the league.

Before you ask, no, it did not improve with time. While the Timberwolves’ new-and-improved offense tantalized, their horrific defense remained. They were held back because of it. It started pretty much at the top. It’s not a good sign when your three most prolific players – Towns, Russell, and Edwards – all make you worse defensively when they’re on the floor.

Minnesota’s defensive rating with Towns:
On the floor: 114.7
Off the floor: 112.8

With Russell:
On the floor: 116.8
Off the floor: 111.9

With Edwards:
On the floor: 115.6
Off the floor: 109.5

In their defense (no pun intended), no one in Minnesota’s rotation made their defense better. Even players typically regarded as apt defenders on this team like Ricky Rubio and Josh Okogie failed to do that. Jarred Vanderbilt was their only player that benefited their defense (that played at least 1000 minutes). Their defense allowed 6.2 fewer points per 100 possessions with him on the floor.

The Timberwolves have a lot of work to do to pick it up defensively. Since they are made up of defensive liabilities mostly, there won’t be any quick fixes. Hypothetically, maybe a Head Coach like a Tom Thibodeau could use his defensive wizardry to solve their defensive shortcomings.

Oh right…

Opportunities

At this point, we already know what to expect from the duo of Towns and Russell. Towns is a valuable commodity. Russell, not so much. However, both are certified bucket getters. While that’s all well and good, their teams have not fared too well with them at the helm for the most part. We knew this time last year that, for Minnesota to become relevant again, they needed a cornerstone-like player. The early returns say that they have that player in Anthony Edwards

Edwards looks like the answer Minnesota’s craved for well over a decade. His vast improvement as a player over time should make everyone giddy about what his potential could do for him and the team. It already paid dividends on one side of the ball. Maybe the defense will do the same. Only at a slower pace.

Even if the defense will need time, the offensive potential doesn’t stem from Edwards alone. When the Timberwolves went on their late-season scoring surge, Malik Beasley suffered a season-ending hamstring injury in early April. The same Beasley who put up career-high scoring numbers (19.6) on 44/40/85 splits wasn’t present when the team was at their peak.

When you factor his return, Edwards’ development, and Towns’ and Russell’s health, the Timberwolves’ offense could be lethal for years to come.

Threats

Six years into his career, Karl-Anthony Towns is already one of the most offensively-skilled bigs in the league. Sadly, all he has to show for it winning-wise is one playoff appearance. Since 2015, it already feels like he’s seen it all. The Tom Thibodeau era failed. The Jimmy Butler trade backfired. Towns’ pairing with Andrew Wiggins amounted to pretty much nothing. Six years after being drafted, we should have seen some modicum of progress from the Timberwolves. The harsh truth is, we haven’t.

Towns has had to take a lot of punches since coming into the league. It’s gotten to the point where you honestly wonder how many more he can stomach as a Timberwolf. Even if Anthony Edwards blossoms into the superstar everyone believes he can be, if positive team results take their sweet time to do the same, how long until Towns justifiably decides he’s fed up with all the losing?

Let’s be real though. Minnesota has done what they can to make him happy. No matter what anyone thinks of D’Angelo Russell as a player, trading for him was smart for Minnesota. It was also concerning. Pairing Towns with his best friend was an effective strategy to appease him for the time being. However, it signified that Minnesota was already worried about Towns’ longevity with the team. It might be for him to play with Russell, but if nothing improves, how long until he asks, “Can’t I play with a winner and my best friend at the same time?”

Edwards’ quick progress and scintillating highlights are what Minnesota desperately needs, but the clock will tick in regards to Towns’ future and by extension, Russell’s if progress either comes slowly or halts entirely.

It’s not perfect, but there’s a lot more optimism (albeit cautious optimism) for Minnesota’s future. That starts and ends with their new golden boy. With Anthony Edwards’ potential, their future might be bright enough to convince Towns and Russell to stay long-term. That would be more certain if they were to take another step forward, which will not be a cakewalk in the Western Conference.

The Timberwolves can rest easy knowing that Edwards might be the franchise player they hoped Andrew Wiggins would be. Even if Towns and Russell leave anyway, Edwards alone looks like a solid foundation. After what the Timberwolves have been through, they couldn’t have asked for anything more.

The headline out of Minneapolis is that there’s hope again for these Timberwolves. We could not say the same last year.

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