Connect with us

NBA

Utah Jazz 2018-19 NBA Season Preview

The Jazz have started to emerge as a legit contender in the West with a great balance of offense and defense. But are they deep enough to be anything more than a playoff team? Basketball Insiders digs into the Utah Jazz in this 2018-19 NBA Season Preview.

Basketball Insiders

Published

on

The Utah Jazz find themselves in a curious position headed into the 2018-19 season. They made some of the fewest notable changes of any team in the association this offseason, essentially bringing back the same band plus the addition of first-round draft pick Grayson Allen. At the same time, an already brutal Western Conference got even tougher over the summer. And yet, most projections and predictions have them at least matching last year’s 48-win total, with many expecting them to exceed this and challenge for home court in the first round of the playoffs.

Some of that is due to expected health improvements, while some is also due to projected internal development and some of the best continuity in the league. There are even projection systems and pundits who give the Jazz a real chance to challenge for the third or even second seed out West. Can the team deliver on some of its highest expectations in recent memory?

FIVE GUYS THINK…

The Utah Jazz didn’t grab any major headlines this offseason but they have plenty of reason to be excited and optimistic as we approach the upcoming season. Utah returns all of its core rotation, which features several players who could take another step forward this season. Rudy Gobert seems to improve each season, though injuries have been an issue in the past. Donovan Mitchell was a breakout star last season and should be even better this season. Dante Exum is still just 23 years old and has plenty of room to keep developing. This team has more continuity in its roster than most teams and a quality coach in Quin Snyder to lead the way. However, the Western Conference is as stacked as ever with Golden State still standing strong at the top of the hill. It’s unlikely that Utah can advance out of the Western Conference playoff race but they will certainly put up a good fight against anyone they are matched up against.

2nd Place – Northwest Division

-Jesse Blancarte

In a league where the elite teams at the top have bent the way we interpret modern basketball, the Utah Jazz are something of a throwback. You can see it in their starting lineup, which succeeds consistently despite their shooting-shy mammoth frontcourt of Rudy Gobert and Derrick Favors. It’s visible in their grinding style of play, one that wears opponents down mentally and physically. Utah’s front office has never wavered in its commitment to this group, as evidenced by a summer where they made virtually no major changes to the roster and will be relying on more of the same to keep them in the upper parts of the West’s playoff conversation.

1st Place – Northwest Division

-Ben Dowsett

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” The Jazz added pretty much nothing to their roster simply because they didn’t have to. Even after losing Gordon Hayward, the Jazz had one of the most resilient seasons in 2017-18. Now that the whole gang is back, plus Grayson Allen, for one more round, the Jazz should expect to take another step forward. Utah now approaches year two in the Donovan Mitchell era, which should bring much optimism given his electric rookie year. The supporting cast he has isn’t very talented, but they all function at a high level together. Because of that, expect more from them. Especially if Dante Exum continues to progress.

2nd Place – Northwest Division

– Matt John

What a fantastic season the Jazz had last year. Having lost Gordon Hayward going into 2017, nearly everybody chalked them up to miss the playoffs. For the first couple of months, it looked that way—until a rookie emerged into a superstar. Donovan Mitchell will try to capitalize on a sensational first season we’ll never forget. Reigning NBA Defensive Player of the Year Rudy Gobert is poised to continue his interior dominance. Ricky Rubio wants to build on a career-year. Joe Ingles will likely continue his ways of being the ultimate teammate and a top three-point shooter. With all of this said, Utah did what they did a year ago with no expectations. The script is flipped this time around. All eyes are on Quin Snyder and company. They’re undoubtedly a top playoff team, but they might fall just short of a Northwest Division title.

2nd Place – Northwest Division

– Spencer Davies

How can you not like what the Jazz have built? They are a tough team defensively, they have a dynamic offensive player in Donovan Mitchell who is just scratching the surface, and their role guys are progressing nicely. Utah is a solid team. The problem is they don’t have the firepower to believe they are truly elite, unless someone we didn’t expect emerges. Maybe that’s Dante Exum, maybe that’s rookie Grayson Allen, maybe it’s Jae Crowder. The problem is you don’t know at this point who the next guy is going to be, if they have that guy at all. Being good is nice, but to matter in the West you have to be great, and it’s hard to see the Jazz as great, especially in the Northwest. The Jazz are going to be a tough out every night and that’s a good thing, but they need one more guy to put them in that top tier and it is just not clear who that guy is yet.

2nd Place – Northwest Division

– Steve Kyler

TOP OF THE LIST

Top Offensive Player: Donovan Mitchell

As a rookie, the questions with Mitchell kept becoming grander and greater in scope as the year went on. Could he crack the rotation? Could he be a spark plug off the bench behind guys like Rodney Hood and Ricky Rubio? Could he start? Could he average 15 points a night?

The answers to all those questions and more proved to be a resounding yes. Mitchell became the first rookie to lead a playoff team in scoring for the year since Carmelo Anthony with the Nuggets over a decade ago, then went toe to toe with Russell Westbrook and Paul George in Utah’s first-round win over the Thunder. He became the first Jazz player, rookie or otherwise, to shoulder a usage load of 29 percent or higher (minimum 500 minutes played) since the great Karl Malone in 2000-01. He’s the Jazz’s answer to the league’s growing emphasis on switching defense, and their go-to when the play breaks down and they need to generate a shot before the clock runs out.

Top Defensive Player: Rudy Gobert

When you’re the league’s reigning Defensive Player of the Year, this category isn’t too tough a call. Gobert is coming off his second straight season leading the NBA in ESPN’s Defensive Real Plus-Minus figure – he’s never finished outside the top-15 in this category since he became a full-time NBA player in his second year. He’s the basis for Utah’s entire defensive strategy, a funneling operation that allows wing defenders to be more aggressive on the perimeter, clog passing lanes and otherwise disrupt things with the knowledge that Gobert is at the rim to clean up mistakes.

Top Playmaker: Ricky Rubio

Rubio averaged by far the fewest assists of his career with the Jazz last year, but that’s a reflection of a scheme, not a player. The Jazz under Quin Snyder emphasize a motion-based system that spreads the playmaking duties around several ball-handlers, and while it took Rubio a few months to get used to it, it eventually clicked and led to a post-All-Star break run that was some of the strongest play of his career. Rubio may not be diming up teammates 10 times a game in Utah, but his effect on the organization and execution of the offense is clear: The Jazz’s assist percentage (the rate of team baskets that drew an assist) dropped from 61.4 percent with him on the floor to 54.8 percent with him on the bench. He could be even more of a force after another full offseason.

Top Clutch Player: Donovan Mitchell

However you define the term “clutch,” Mitchell is clearly that guy for Utah. Using NBA.com’s standard definition – the final five minutes of a game with the score within five points – Mitchell attempted over double the per-minute shots of any other full-season rotation player on the roster. That crazy-high 29 percent usage rate we mentioned earlier? It skyrocketed to 44 percent during these minutes (55 percent in the playoffs!), almost an unfathomable load.

That’s not the only way to think about clutch play, though, at least if you’re liberal about defining it. Consider how reliant the Jazz were on Mitchell to bail them out when the offense stalled, for instance: Donovan attempted more than double the shots in the final four seconds of the shot clock of any other player on the team, per Second Spectrum data. When the Jazz need a bucket, be it in a tight game or just a tight possession, Mitchell is where they turn.

The Unheralded Player: Joe Ingles

As Ingles has gotten a bit of notoriety, including a top-60 finish in the most recent SI Top-100 Players list, this title is at risk of losing its validity to some degree. Still, though, there are plenty of opposing broadcast crews still wondering who the heck this balding Australian guy is as he drops his sixth three-pointer of the night on their team.

Ingles quietly does a little bit of everything for the Jazz. He’s sporting two consecutive finishes in the league’s top five three-point shooters by accuracy, a distinction shared by only Washington’s Otto Porter. Ingles isn’t flashy, but he’s a more than capable pick-and-roll operator with one of the best pass-fakes in the entire league. He’s a jack-of-all-trades defender who spends time on point guards and power forwards alike. And best yet, he’s a grounding presence in a tight Jazz locker room.

Best New Addition: Grayson Allen

Allen wins this one by default – he’s the only actual addition the Jazz made to their 15-man roster who didn’t play for them last year. The front office is incredibly high on Allen, a four-year college prospect who had to adjust his game multiple times at Duke to make room for various talented freshmen. They see him as a light version of Kyle Korver offensively, a guy who can rocket around screens and draw defensive eyes away from guys like Mitchell and Rubio – but who can also put the ball and the floor and run pick-and-roll as a secondary creator. Time will tell if he has the length and lateral speed to defend at a high NBA level, but he’s got sneaky vertical athleticism for his size and already thinks the game really well. It’ll be interesting to see if he can crack consistent rotation minutes for a team that’s deep on the perimeter.

-Ben Dowsett

WHO WE LIKE

1. Quin Snyder

Fresh off a second-place finish in the Coach of the Year vote, Snyder has finally begun to draw his due credit around the league for the job he does in Utah. His staff is consistently among the most detailed and prepared in the league, something opposing coaches will happily confirm for you if you ask them. Snyder’s player development skills are also beginning to get recognition – the hiring of former assistant Igor Kokoskov as head coach for a young roster in Phoenix is just one piece of that. Snyder demands a lot from his players, but he puts just as much into the job. He’s a clear asset in Utah.

2. Derrick Favors

Favors deserves real praise for the way he’s accepted multiple changes in roles since Rudy Gobert’s ascent to among the league’s dominant centers, and he got a bit of a reward this offseason with a nice two-year deal from the Jazz (second year non-guaranteed). The deal is great for both sides – Favors gets a nice bump for a year or two, then can re-enter the market while still in his late 20s. The Jazz, meanwhile, have the ability to get off Favors’ contract in just a year if they can land a big fish on the 2019 free agency market. If not, though, they can simply retain him as a starting power forward and arguably the league’s best backup center. He’s a consistent presence on the floor who serves as an excellent insurance policy in case Gobert struggles with injuries.

3. Dante Exum

Another guy who got rewarded over the offseason was Exum, who’s been plagued by two extremely unfortunate injuries but retains the trust of the Jazz front office regardless. The young Aussie showed flashes of his defensive potential late last year, including some elite-level defense on James Harden and other top ball-handlers. Utah paid a bit of a premium on his three-year deal, but they did so with the assumption that this is still far from a finished product. He projects as a third guard behind Mitchell and Rubio, but has the size to play some three at times and could see a lot more court time if his offensive game becomes just a bit more consistent.

4. The 4s

The Jazz quietly have one of the strongest groups of power forwards in the league, one that includes a great deal of versatility. They’ll start with their twin towers combo of Favors and Gobert, a duo that’s continued to crush most teams even despite the league’s emphasis on spacing. Favors will mostly play backup center after those early first- and third-quarter stints, but Snyder will then have his choice of Jae Crowder or Thabo Sefolosha – the former coming off a strange season where he lacked a lot of his usual preparation after the death of his mother and multiple trades, the latter recovering from an MCL injury while also returning from a drug suspension.

The Jazz have consistently dominated playing these wing types at four next to Gobert, and they may be able to downsize even further and play guys like Joe Ingles or Royce O’Neale there (O’Neale deserved to make this list on his own, but there’s only so much space). And watch out for newcomer Georges Niang, who spent much of last season with the SLC Stars in the G-League. Niang doesn’t jump out of the gym, but he’s a savvy and skilled guy who can really stretch the floor.

5. Dennis Lindsey and Co.

The Jazz’s coaching staff has begun to receive plaudits for the work it does, and the same can be said about the front office. Helmed by GM Dennis Lindsey, Jazz brass has secured a number of big wins over recent years: Trading for Donovan Mitchell, hiring Quin Snyder and moving up in the draft to select Rudy Gobert chief among them.

What really separates them, though, is their work around the margins. Look at a guy like Royce O’Neale, who Lindsey and his group signed as an undrafted 24-year-old free agent a year ago – by the end of the year, he was a vital rotation piece who might be the team’s best overall perimeter defender. Imagine how much a team like Houston could have used O’Neale when their seven-man rotation was running out of steam against the Warriors in the conference finals; that one more capable wing body could have done wonders. The Lindsey track record is filled with those kinds of moves, from Joe Ingles (cut by the Clippers) to guys like Sefolosha and Ekpe Udoh.

-Ben Dowsett

STRENGTHS

The Jazz have a number of strengths, but everything starts with their continuity. Few teams will be as comfortable with each other from the jump as this group, which returns every guy from last year’s end-of-season rotation. Linked to this is the defense, which is obviously a strength due to personnel like Gobert first and foremost, but also adds up to a sum greater than its parts due to this familiarity.

Depth is another clear strength for the Jazz. Snyder ran 11-deep at times last season, and that was with a few injuries and before adding a rookie in Grayson Allen who looks like he could be capable of bench minutes at least. There will be real competition for playing time in Utah, often among guys who could walk into rotation spots on many other teams.

-Ben Dowsett

WEAKNESSES

The Jazz finished almost exactly league average last season for points scored per-possession, so this isn’t necessarily a weakness in a vacuum, but it’s certainly a concern for the heights this team hopes to reach. In particular, Utah has had issues with teams that emphasize a lot of switching in their defenses – since the departure of Gordon Hayward (and even before then, honestly), they’ve been a bit short on guys who can consistently win the one-on-one mismatches you get from those defenses. Mitchell quickly became that guy as a rookie – can he improve his efficiency on these plays a bit? Can others, such as Exum or Alec Burks, help shoulder some of that load?

One area that could help in terms of picking the low-hanging offensive fruit is transition, where the Jazz haven’t been quite aggressive enough in recent seasons. Per Cleaning the Glass, they were the sixth-most efficient team in the league last year on the break, scoring a robust 125.7 points per play – but they ran in transition just 19th-most in the league on a per-possession basis. Running more might lead to a slight decrease in that efficiency number, but we’re still talking about possessions that are far more valuable than the standard halfcourt look. It’s understandable that Snyder wants to control the tempo of the game and grind teams down, and there’s a limit to how much teams can run when you think about conditioning, but it’s still something Utah could prioritize a bit more.

-Ben Dowsett

THE BURNING QUESTION

Is this Jazz core a year away from true title contention, or are they still missing a major piece?

We’re going big-picture with this one. With apologies to Jazz fans everywhere (and the fans of at least 26 other teams, most likely), their chances of winning the title this season are slim to none while this version of the Warriors remains intact. But that doesn’t mean this year is meaningless, even without a freak event like an injury in the Bay.

This is a chance to assess this core against the other elite teams in the league. It’s a chance to see how much more development guys like Mitchell, Exum and even Gobert have in them. If they’re close enough to the Warriors and Rockets of the league by season’s end, Lindsey and his team could reasonably conclude that moderate offseason moves in 2019 (plus more internal development) will be enough to push them into true title contention pending events in Oakland. If not, the front office will have a clearer idea of what they need to do or add to help bridge that gap. There are numerous smaller questions about this team, such as whether they can get home court in the first round and whether they can make the second round for the third year straight, but this is the broadest one in regard to the franchise’s future.

-Ben Dowsett

Advertisement




Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

NBA

NBA Daily: To Tank Or Not To Tank, That’s The Question In Brooklyn

With their season quickly falling apart, the Brooklyn Nets must decide on the best path forward and commit to it, writes Ben Nadeau.

Ben Nadeau

Published

on

The Brooklyn Nets, fresh off three straight seasons of disappointing results, finally looked halfway competent to start the 2018-19 campaign. Fueled by the impending breakout of Caris LeVert, the Nets began the year a very manageable 6-7 — a record that had them in the mix for a postseason berth within a muddied Eastern Conference. With big-time homegrown assets like Spencer Dinwiddie and Joe Harris making strides and youngsters like D’Angelo Russell and Jarrett Allen on the up-and-up, it was officially time to be optimistic, if not downright positive, in Brooklyn once again.

Then disaster struck all at once.

Despite the minor miracle surrounding the brutal, gut-wrenching injury that LeVert suffered on Nov. 12 in Minnesota, his absence has buried the Nets from the inside out. Since then, the Nets have gone 3-10 and now sit only three games back from the ever-so-familiar territory of the conference basement. During this low streak, Brooklyn has blown multiple double-digit leads, gave the win away against Memphis (twice) and suffered a 14-point loss to the dysfunctional Washington Wizards. From playoff contenders to the bottom of the ladder at the snap of a finger, it’s gone from bad to worse very quickly for the Nets.

Well, unless you’ve got your eye on the 2019 NBA Draft, that is.

This is, of course, the first season that the Nets have held their own draft pick since 2013. And, perhaps rightfully so, there are compelling arguments to now release the safety brakes and tank out, especially with LeVert no longer leading the way. Zion Williamson, R.J. Barrett and Cam Reddish represent the crown jewel trio of NBA-ready prospects and adding any of them — let alone the hulking Bol Bol or high-scoring Romeo Langford — would jumpstart the Nets’ rebuild in a way not yet seen. Still, the Nets have said from the start of training camp that they’d try to be competitive because their attempt to develop a winning culture needs, well, wins.

Tired of losing — 69-177 over the last three seasons will do that to a franchise — the Nets have constantly put themselves in a position to win, at least for the first 36 minutes or so. But with so many crucial, organization-altering decisions on the very near horizon, Brooklyn will need to reevaluate their direction if the losses continue to pile up. At what point does incubating culture come at the expense of missing out on an elite prospect? On the other hand, their error-prone defeatism would certainly put a toll on a growing roster, head coach and front office if it continued until April as well.

Aside from outright winning — LeVert’s injury was cruel timing in more ways than one — there appears to be no unanimously great path forward from here.

For example, there’s the internal struggle over Spencer Dinwiddie and D’Angelo Russell. As two of the Nets’ best players, a desire to retain them both is understandable — but unless one is willing to come off the bench for the foreseeable future, it may not be the road the franchise wants to head down. Dinwiddie is eligible for his extension worth $47.5 million on Dec. 8 and the Nets’ biggest success story in Brooklyn remains candid about his desire to either stay or test the free agent market come June. The flipside of this two-headed coin is Russell, a younger, higher-ceiling guard that has struggled to find consistency every night thus far. Russell is the only roster member capable of the 38-point, 8-rebound, 8-assist effort he dropped last month against the Philadelphia 76ers, but also he’s spent many late-game scenarios glued to the bench as well.

Russell, as luck would have it, is a restricted free agent come July and he’ll likely have a long list of suitors himself. If the Nets commit to Dinwiddie, they could end up letting Russell walk for nothing. If the Nets take a wait-and-see approach to Russell, they could obviously lose Dinwiddie and leave that situation empty-handed instead.

(For more on this intriguing dilemma, check out Drew Maresca’s most recent piece here.)

Utilizing them both will have a negative impact on the Nets’ eventual lottery position — unless, naturally, the organization truly believes they can tread water until LeVert’s undetermined return. But the Nets will need to decide if hanging around eighth place is really worth missing out on a blue-chip prospect. Even if Brooklyn won’t commit to one or both (or neither) of their point guards just yet — Dinwiddie is extension-eligible until Jun. 30 — there’s another tweak that could help determine their best-foraged way to the future: The often-maligned youth movement.

There’s a clamor for another youth movement in Brooklyn that grows louder with each defeat, this time for Dzanan Musa, Rodions Kurucs, Theo Pinson and Alan Williams. Frankly, the foursome has been tearing up the G League for the Long Island Nets and the thought-process here is rather simple. Play the prospects and rookies and if they energize an at-times lethargic Nets squad — see Kurucs versus the Knicks — then great. If it doesn’t and the Nets keep falling down the conference ladder, then at least their future assets will have gained valuable experience at the NBA level.

Musa, the No. 29 overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft, has appeared in just seven games so far, most often as the ceremonial white flag in a loss. On Long Island, Musa has averaged 20 points, 6.4 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 1.3 steals per game — but as he’s stuck behind a veteran-laden backcourt rotation, there may not be a true opportunity here without a trade. For Kurucs, his previous exclusion has been harder to quantify. Kurucs was forced into the rotation after preseason injuries to Rondae Hollis-Jefferson and DeMarre Carroll and the 20-year-old Latvian not only held his own, he thrived.

He’s tallied 7.3 points and 3.3 rebounds over 12.3 minutes per game, an athletic forward finding his place through aggressive open court action and a willingness to get dirty. An injury of his own knocked Kurucs back out of the rotation briefly — wherein that time, Hollis-Jefferson and Carroll both returned — but head coach Kenny Atkinson recently admitted that they may need to find more time for him moving forward.

The pair of two-way signees, Wiliams and Pinson, are considerably less urgent since the Nets can shuttle them between teams for up to 45 days before a decision has to be made. In any case, it’s not hard to imagine that both could help the Nets right now if that’s what the team is still aiming for in 2018-19. For argument’s sake, Brooklyn’s front office could be auditioning the likes of Jared Dudley, Kenneth Faried and the aforementioned Carroll — all of whom are expiring contracts — ahead of the trade deadline. Last season, the Nets’ extracted a second-round pick out the Milwaukee Bucks for Tyler Zeller, so that route is sensical, especially for general manager Sean Marks.

However, Faried has barely seen the floor at all, notching only 5.6 minutes over just eight contests so far. As of Friday, the Nets ranked 25th in rebounds per game at 32.7 and Faried, an eight-year veteran, has gobbled up a career average of 8.1 of them along the way but this seemingly perfect union hasn’t come together. Faried would conceivably help the Nets with their rebounding issues and put him front and center for a potential move elsewhere, so its become an overall confusing footnote indeed. Williams, a former NBA center himself, has pulled down 13.9 rebounds in just 25.2 minutes per game for Long Island — he, in all likelihood, is too good for the G League.

Elsewhere, Carroll underwent a career resurgence in Brooklyn in 2017-18 and he’d be worth a valuable return on the trade market if he’s available — but if the Nets still want to reach the postseason, the gritty veteran would almost definitely remain in their plans. Lastly, there’s Hollis-Jefferson, who, like Russell, will venture into restricted free agency this summer too. While the stretchy forward has been solidly part of the Nets’ rebuild, he could be an eventual casualty depending on how the Dinwiddie-Russell conundrum unfolds. Basically, there are difficult puzzles to solve here without any discernable, clear-cut answers.

But when the overarching goal is to compete despite the loss of your best player, the water gets muddied quickly. It’s hard to find time for both the veteran on an expiring contract and the scrappy rookie when those late-game wins turn into shocking losses time and time again.

Stuck between two frames of mind, the franchise has been tossed into a difficult position — to tank or tread water, that is the debate. LeVert’s injury turned a promising season into turmoil, but sooner rather than later, the Nets will need to take stock and determine how to most effectively proceed. Whether that’s the calculating the value of their two electric guards or the puzzling use of those back-of-the-rotation assets, it’ll be a busy winter and spring for the Nets’ front office, full of challenging questions that absolutely require the right answers.

Until then, even if the agonizing defeats continue to rise, the Nets must simply decide what kind of team they want to be.

Continue Reading

NBA

Reaction: Hill To Bucks In Three-Team Trade

There was a lot of moving pieces and parts in this three-way Eastern Conference deal between the Bucks, Cavaliers and Wizards. Spencer Davies looks at its effects.

Spencer Davies

Published

on

The Cleveland Cavaliers have traded George Hill and a 2021 second-round pick to the Milwaukee Bucks in exchange for Matthew Dellavedova, John Henson and two future draft picks, a 2021 first-rounder and 2021 second-rounder.

The Washington Wizards acquired Sam Dekker to make it a three-team deal and subsequently sent Jason Smith, an unprotected 2020 second-round draft pick and cash considerations to the Bucks.

The Cavaliers created as $2.76 million trade exception and the Wizards created a $2.68 million trade exception stemming from the transaction, per Bobby Marks of ESPN.

The Milwaukee picks going to Cleveland are both protected under specific parameters. The Bucks are sending a first-round draft pick that is lottery-protected in 2021, but will likely go to the Phoenix Suns due to the Eric Bledsoe deal last season.

Per reports, chances are the pick will be conveyed to the Cavaliers in 2022, when it is top-10 protected, meaning the Bucks would have to finish in the bottom third of the league standings that year.

If Milwaukee’s first-round draft pick does not convey by 2024, it will send its own 2024 and 2025 second-round draft picks to Cleveland.

For a more detailed look at the protections, here’s an overview:

2021: Top-14 protected
2022: Top-10 protected
2023: Protected 1-10 and 25-30
2024: Top-8 protected

In summation:

MIL gets: George Hill, Jason Smith, removed protections on Bucks 2020 2nd round pick (via Wizards in Jodie Meeks trade with Bucks), Cavaliers 2021 2nd round pick (via Wizards from Jazz), cash considerations from Wizards

CLE gets: Matthew Dellavedova, John Henson, Bucks 2021 1st round pick (protected), Bucks 2021 2nd round pick, Wizards 2022 2nd round pick

WAS gets: Sam Dekker

So let’s look at this deal for all three sides.

Milwaukee Bucks

The Bucks offloaded two contracts they were looking to shed, and they found a partner to do so. It didn’t cost much other than the picks, and those were heavily protected anyways. Plus, if you’re Milwaukee, it’s not about the future anymore. It’s about right now.

George Hill is a veteran with plenty of postseason experience and has plenty left in the tank to offer on the court. Before he went down with a shoulder injury, Hill was shooting the ball extremely well—a career-high 46.2 percent from three—and, when assuming Cleveland’s scoring responsibility, he showed his worth. The Cavaliers loved him as a leader in the locker room and for being the consummate professional that he is. He just didn’t fit the team’s timeline and the writing was on the wall with Colin Sexton’s development.

It’ll be intriguing to see how Bucks head coach Mike Budenholzer decides to use Hill. He’s a versatile guard who can work the pick and roll, as well as play off-ball. Milwaukee has Eric Bledsoe and Malcolm Brogdon working together at the moment, so it’s unlikely he’ll split that pairing. Hill could be primarily a part of the bench unit, but there’s no question Budenholzer will find a way to find playing time for him with the ones.

Jason Smith is a serviceable big who will probably serve as an insurance policy in the event of an injury. The 32-year-old is more of a traditional center, but has proved on a few occasions that he can step up and knock down shots. The Bucks already have guys like Brook Lopez and Thon Maker to play at the five, but if somebody goes down, it’s not bad to have a backup plan.

Cleveland Cavaliers

This is the second trade the Cavaliers have made in the last week. Last Friday, they moved Kyle Korver to the Utah Jazz and landed Alec Burks along with two future second round picks. Now, they’ve executed another one.

It’s well-known that Cleveland is actively searching to take on sizeable contracts that teams want to rid themselves of, with the reason being that those contracts will likely have draft picks attached to them. As an organization looking towards the long-term, asset accumulation mode is in full effect. They’re not done by any means.

Taking a glance at the players the Cavaliers received, they’re quite familiar with one. Matthew Dellavedova—nicknamed “Delly”—is a fan favorite of the city and was a part of the 2016 NBA Championship version of the wine and gold. In his last two seasons with the Bucks, he’s dealt with injuries and he’s been kicked from the rotation. Maybe a return to the franchise that gave him an opportunity will do some good.

The other player in this trade is John Henson, a former lottery pick in 2012 out of North Carolina. As this writer guessed before the season started, Henson was always going to be the odd man out in Milwaukee. The system changed with Budenholzer coming in and the team added two stretch bigs, Ersan Ilyasova and Brook Lopez, to the mix. To the 28-year-old center’s credit, he did a solid job of adjusting.

Regardless, Henson tore a ligament in his left wrist and will possibly be out until after the All-Star break. When he’s on the floor, he is a hustler and a big man that provides second chance opportunities. Henson will use his length to his advantage and get you blocks as well.

Both Dellavedova and Henson are under contract for the next two years, including this season. Whether they’ll be a part of the Cavaliers for more than a short stay we’ll have to wait and see.

Washington Wizards

Just when we thought the trade was complete between Milwaukee and Cleveland, the Wizards decided to jump in and get some help on the wing. They had little use for Jason Smith in trending towards small ball, so they found somebody in Sam Dekker who fits those current needs much more naturally.

Dekker has been hampered with a left ankle sprain since early November. He had started in five of the nine games he played in. What he is best used for is backdoor cuts on the baseline, as Dekker is somewhat of a slashing hybrid between a wing and a big.

His biggest career knock has been an inability to shoot consistently, but on the bright side, Dekker has hit a career-best 38.5 percent of his triples. That is within a small sample size, though (5-for-13). In any case, he’ll help space Washington’s offense more and might actually be able to get some playing time—depending on what head coach Scott Brooks decides to do.

There was a lot of moving pieces and parts in this three-way Eastern Conference deal.

We’ll see how things turn out for everyone as the season progresses.

Continue Reading

NBA

NBA Daily: Looking for the Next Head Coach in Chicago

The Bulls recently fired Fred Hoiberg. Shane Rhodes takes a look at possible candidates to become Chicago’s next head coach

Shane Rhodes

Published

on

The Chicago Bulls have found themselves stuck in the mud over the last three seasons; a 110-136 record can attest to that. However, with Lauri Markkanen ready to take the next step coupled with a solid offseason, 2018-19 was supposed to be a good season for the Bulls.

It hasn’t gone exactly as planned.

After a 5-19 start to forget, Chicago relieved Head Coach Fred Hoiberg of his duties. In his stead, the front office promoted former Assistant Coach Jim Boylen, who the front office has expressed confidence in going forward. But, with the Bulls being where they are in their rebuild, he is by no means a lock to take over permanently.

So, who could be some of the candidates the Bulls consider down the line?

Jim Boylen

The Bulls, as they should, have high hopes for Boylen in his newfound role. Almost anything would be better than the product Chicago has put forth this season.

But let’s be honest; Hoiberg wasn’t the only reason this roster stumbled out of the gate. Injuries to and lackluster performances from the roster have also played a significant role. If Boylen can’t turn things around and win some games now, he may not have a shot at anything long-term.

That being said, if he can get this team to show almost any signs of life he may be the best bet for the job to start next season. It, at the very least, would give him a leg up on the field.

Ettore Messina

Ettore Messina has been connected to nearly every head coaching search over the past year, and for good reason: he has some serious experience under his belt.

A current assistant to Gregg Popovich in San Antonio, Messina also has an extensive resume as a head coach in Europe. Not only is he a four-time champion and two-time Coach of the Year in the EuroLeague, but Messina has won championships in Italy and Russia as well.

The winning pedigree, combined with the knowledge gained from his time with Popovich, should be as enticing to the Bulls as it has been for other teams. If Boylen can’t find a foothold, Messina could be the front-runner for the job come the offseason.

Monty Williams

Another former Spur, now Philadelphia 76er, Monty Williams is another candidate with a solid resume behind him.

Before his time as an assistant on the 76ers coaching staff, Williams spent time as the Vice President of Basketball of Operations in San Antonio. Before that, Williams was the head coach for the New Orleans Pelicans and has spent time on the pine for the Portland Trail Blazers and Oklahoma City Thunder as well.

Dating back to his time in New Orleans, Williams has been known as a players’ coach, which may be the perfect personality fit for this young Chicago roster. And, with so much talent already in-house — Markkanen, Wendell Carter Jr., Kris Dunn and Zach LaVine — there may not be a better place for Williams to land if he truly wants to rejoin the head coaching ranks.

Stan Van Gundy

Stan Van Gundy has made some very questionable moves as an executive. But, as a head coach, the resume is hard to ignore.

During his four-year stint with the Detroit Pistons, Van Gundy managed the team to their only postseason appearance in the last decade. He coached his teams to multiple 50-win seasons during his time with the Miami HEAT and Orlando Magic and should bring a nice change of pace to what Hoiberg had done during his time with the team.

With Gar Forman firmly entrenched as the Bulls’ General Manager, Van Gundy’s spotty history as an executive shouldn’t be an issue as well.

Jay Larrañaga

Jay Larrañaga has been with the Boston Celtics for a long time; he predates head coach Brad Stevens as a member of the coaching staff. To stick around for so long, he must be doing something right, right?

In all seriousness, Larranaga has a solid basketball resume and coaching background; not only is Larrañaga a former player and G-League (then D-League) coach but his father, Jim Larrañaga, is the current head coach at the University of Miami and is a coaching veteran of more than four decades. And, as much as people heap praise Stevens for the job he has done in Boston, Larrañaga has also played a vital role in the development of Celtics’ young core.

The Bulls have a long season ahead of them, but the search for a head coach is one they shouldn’t take lightly. While they have some young talent on the rise, Chicago will need a steady hand to guide them and return the franchise to its winning ways — if they just settle or choose the wrong person for the job, the team could easily find themselves back at square one with an even longer rebuild ahead of them.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

NBA Team Salaries

Advertisement

Insiders On Twitter

NBA On Twitter

Trending Now