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Breakdown of the Current NBA Financial Landscape

Salary cap guru Eric Pincus breaks down the current financial situation for each NBA team.

Eric Pincus

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The NBA’s national television deal helped raise the league’s salary cap to $94.1 million, a historic jump from last year’s $70 million.

Armed with increased spending power, teams invested heavily, topping out with LeBron James, who is earning $31 million as the highest paid player in the NBA.

James’ salary represents 32.9 percent of the salary cap, but with the Cavaliers paying out $129.3 million to players this season, James is just 23.9 percent of the team’s payroll.

For the 2015-16 season, James earned $23 million, an equivalent of 32.8 percent of the salary cap, and 21.5 percent of Cleveland’s payroll.

Teams have limited spending tools. The Cavaliers have creatively amassed the NBA’s highest payroll, but most teams are contracted to pay $90-$110 million this year.

How wisely those resources have been allocated can be the difference between a contender and an also-ran. It can be easy to get caught up in the dollar value of a player’s contract, but looking instead at the percentage of team salary can help put the NBA’s recent inflation into perspective.

By that measure, Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook is the highest paid player this season. The MVP candidate is earning 30.5 percent of Oklahoma City’s payroll.

For now, C.J. McCollum is one of the NBA’s most productive starters at an economic 2.9 percent of the Portland Trail Blazers’ salary. On a recently-signed extension, his new salary will push him closer to 20 percent next season.

Chris Bosh’s unfortunate health situation has a major portion of the Miami HEAT’s salary tied up (23.4 percent) in a player the team won’t clear to play this season. The Philadelphia 76ers have almost a quarter of their salary (23.3 percent) going to injured forward Ben Simmons and waived players (Carl Landry, Tibor Pleiss, etc.).

Meanwhile, the Los Angeles Lakers are paying their starters just 51.3 percent of their total salary, appropriate given how important the bench has been in the team’s surprising start.

The following list details how much teams are paying for their players. The figures are percentages of total payroll.

Atlanta HawksAtlanta Hawks

Salary Total: $99,289,619

Healthy Starters (67.4 percent): Dwight Howard (23.3), Paul Millsap (20.2), Kent Bazemore (15.8), Kyle Korver (5.3), Dennis Schroder (2.7)

Highest Reserve: Tiago Splitter (8.6)

Other Contributors: Kris Humphries (4.0), Thabo Sefolosha (3.9), Malcolm Delaney (2.5), Tim Hardaway Jr. (2.3), Mike Muscala (1.0)

Dead Money (waived players): 0.1

Atlanta Hawks Team Salary

Boston CelticsBoston Celtics

Salary Total: $93,035,160

Healthy Starters (64.2): Al Horford (28.5), Amir Johnson (12.9), Avery Bradley (8.9), Isaiah Thomas (7.1), Jae Crowder (6.8)

Highest Reserve: Tyler Zeller (8.6)

Other Contributors: Jonas Jerebko (5.4), Jaylen Brown (5.1), Marcus Smart (3.8), Kelly Olynyk (3.3), Terry Rozier (2.0), Gerald Green (1.1)

Dead Money: 1.7

Boston Celtics Team Salary

Brooklyn NetsBrooklyn Nets

Salary Total: $76,058.742

Healthy Starters (61.6): Brook Lopez (27.8), Jeremy Lin (15.1), Trevor Booker (12.2), Bojan Bogdanovic (4.7), Rondae Hollis-Jefferson (1.8)

Highest Reserve: Luis Scola (7.2)

Other Contributors: Justin Hamilton (3.9), Randy Foye (3.3), Isaiah Whitehead (1.4), Anthony Bennett (1.3), Sean Kilpatrick (1.3), Joe Harris (1.3), Yogi Ferrell (0.7)

Dead Money: 14.3

Brooklyn Nets Team Salary

Charlotte HornetsCharlotte Hornets

Salary Total: $99,709,773

Healthy Starters (63.6): Nicolas Batum (20.9), Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (13.0), Marvin Williams (12.3), Kemba Walker (12.0), Cody Zeller (5.3)

Highest Reserve: Jeremy Lamb (6.5)

Other Contributors: Spencer Hawes (6.4), Marco Belinelli (6.4), Ramon Sessions (6.0), Roy Hibbert (5.0), Frank Kaminsky (2.7)

Dead Money: 0.1

Charlotte Hornets Team Salary

Chicago BullsChicago Bulls

Salary Total: $97,133,573

Healthy Starters (79.2): Dwyane Wade (23.9), Jimmy Butler (18.1), Rajon Rondo (14.4), Robin Lopez (13.6), Taj Gibson (9.2)

Highest Reserve: Nikola Mirotic (6.0)

Other Contributors: Michael Carter-Williams (3.3), Doug McDermott (2.6), Jerian Grant (1.7), Bobby Portis (1.5), Isaiah Canaan (1.0), Christiano Felicio (1.3)

Dead Money: 0.1

Chicago Bulls Team Salary

Cleveland CavaliersCleveland Cavaliers

Salary Total: $129,294,181

Healthy Starters (75.7): LeBron James (23.9), Kevin Love (16.4), Kyrie Irving (13.6), Tristan Thompson (11.9), J.R. Smith (9.9)

Highest Reserve: Iman Shumpert (7.5)

Other Contributors: Channing Frye (6.0), Mike Dunleavy Jr. (3.7), Richard Jefferson (1.9), Jordan McRae (0.7)

Dead Money: None, although Mo Williams (1.7) is under contract but is functionally retired.

Cleveland Cavaliers Team Salary

Dallas MavericksDallas Mavericks

Salary Total: $110,920.751

Healthy Starters (76.0): Dirk Nowitzki (22.5), Harrison Barnes (19.9), Wesley Matthews (15.5), Andrew Bogut (9.9), Deron Williams (8.1)

Highest Reserve: Dwight Powell (7.6)

Other Contributors: J.J. Barea (3.7), Seth Curry (2.6), Justin Anderson (1.4), Salah Mejri (0.8), Dorian Finney-Smith (0.5)

Dead Money: 2.2

Dallas Mavericks Team Salary

Denver NuggetsDenver Nuggets

Salary Total: $75,242,914

Healthy Starters (30.9): Danilo Gallinari (20.0), Emmanuel Mudiay (3.4), Jusuf Nurkic (2.0), Gary Harris (1.8), Nikola Jokic (1.8)

Note: The Nuggets have recently experimented with different starting lineups.

Highest Reserve: Kenneth Faried (16.1)

Other Contributors: Wilson Chandler (14.9), Jameer Nelson (6.0), Will Barton (4.7), Jamal Murray (4.3), Juancho Hernangomez (2.6)

Dead Money: 1.8

Denver Nuggets Team Salary

Detroit PistonsDetroit Pistons

Salary Total: $107,901,937

Healthy Starters (58.0): Andre Drummond (20.5), Tobias Harris (15.9), Reggie Jackson (13.9), Marcus Morris (4.3), Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (3.4)

Highest Reserve: Jon Leuer (10.2)

Other Contributors: Ish Smith (5.6), Beno Udrih (0.9), Aron Baynes (6.0), Stanley Johnson (2.8)

Dead Money: 5.0

Detroit Pistons Team Salary

Golden State WarriorsGolden State Warriors

Salary Total: $99,638,439

Healthy Starters (73.8): Kevin Durant (26.6), Klay Thompson (16.7), Draymond Green (15.4), Stephen Curry (12.2), Zaza Pachulia (2.9)

Highest Reserve: Andre Iguodala (11.2)

Other Contributors: Shaun Livingston (5.8), Ian Clark (1.0), Patrick McCaw (0.5), David West (1.0)

Dead Money: 1.4

Golden State Warriors Team Salary

Houston RocketsHouston Rockets

Salary Total: $94,830,624

Healthy Starters (70.4): James Harden (28.0), Ryan Anderson (19.8), Eric Gordon (13.1), Trevor Ariza (8.2), Clint Capela (1.4)

Highest Reserve: Corey Brewer (8.0)

Other Contributors: Patrick Beverley (6.3), K.J. McDaniels (3.1), Nene (3.1), Sam Dekker (1.8), Tyler Ennis (1.8)

Dead Money: 1.7

Houston Rockets

Indiana PacersIndiana Pacers

Salary Total: $90,002,004

Healthy Starters (60.5): Paul George (20.3), Thaddeus Young (15.7), Monta Ellis (12.0), Jeff Teague (9.8)

Highest Reserve: Al Jefferson (11.4)

Other Contributors: Rodney Stuckey (7.8), C.J. Miles (5.1), Lavoy Allen (4.4), Aaron Brooks (3.0), Kevin Seraphin (2.0), Glenn Robinson III (1.2)

Dead Money: 1.5

Indiana Pacers Team Salary

Los Angeles Clippers Los Angeles Clippers

Salary Total: $114,740,032

Healthy Starters (64.8): Chris Paul (19.9), DeAndre Jordan (18.4), Blake Griffin (17.6), J.J. Redick (6.4), Luc Mbah a Moute (1.9)

Highest Reserve: Jamal Crawford (11.6)

Other Contributors: Austin Rivers (9.6), Wesley Johnson (4.9), Marreese Speights (1.2), Raymond Felton (0.9), Brandon Bass (0.9)

Dead Money: 1.2

Los Angeles Clippers Team Salary

Los Angeles LakersLos Angeles Lakers

Salary Total: $93,613,079

Healthy Starters (51.3): Luol Deng (19.2), Timofey Mozgov (17.1), Nick Young (5.8), D’Angelo Russell (5.7), Julius Randle (3.5)

Highest Reserve: Jordan Clarkson (13.4)

Other Contributors: Lou Williams (7.5), Tarik Black (6.6), Brandon Ingram (5.6), Larry Nance Jr. (1.3)

Dead Money: 1.3

Los Angeles Lakers Team Salary

Memphis GrizzliesMemphis Grizzlies

Salary Total: $110,288,212

Healthy Starters (66.8): Mike Conley (24.1), Chandler Parsons (20.1), Marc Gasol (19.2), James Ennis (2.6), JaMychal Green (0.9)

Highest Reserve: Zach Randolph (9.4)

Other Contributors: Tony Allen (5.0), Vince Carter (3.9), Andrew Harrison (0.9), Jarell Martin (1.2), Wade Baldwin (1.6)

Dead Money: 1.3

Memphis Grizzlies Team Salary

Miami HEATMiami HEAT

Salary Total: $101,513,503

Healthy Starters (43.7): Hassan Whiteside (21.8), Goran Dragic (15.7), Dion Waiters (2.9), Justise Winslow (2.6), Josh Richardson (0.9)

Highest Reserve: Wayne Ellington (5.9)

Other Contributors: Derrick Williams (4.5), James Johnson (3.9), Luke Babbitt (1.2), Willie Reed (1.0), Rodney McGruder (0.5)

Dead Money: 0.6 plus Chris Bosh (23.4), who is unable to clear a Miami physical.

Miami HEAT Team Salary

Milwaukee BucksMilwaukee Bucks

Salary Total: $98,493,672

Healthy Starters (31.3): John Henson (12.5), Matthew Dellavedova (9.8), Jabari Parker (5.5), Giannis Antetokounmpo (3.0), Tony Snell (2.4)

Highest Reserve: Greg Monroe (17.4)

Other Contributors: Miles Plumlee (12.7), Michael Beasley (1.4), Mirza Teletovic (10.7), Malcolm Brogdon (0.9), Rashad Vaughn (1.8), Jason Terry (1.0)

Dead Money: 1.9 plus Khris Middleton (15.4) who is likely out for the season.

Milwaukee Bucks Team Salary

Minnesota TimberwolvesMinnesota Timberwolves

Salary Total: $81,771,877

Healthy Starters (36.8): Ricky Rubio (16.6), Andrew Wiggins (7.3), Karl-Anthony Towns (7.3), Gorgui Dieng (2.9), Zach LaVine (2.7)

Highest Reserve: Cole Aldrich (9.3)

Other Contributors: Shabazz Muhammad (3.7), Nemanja Bjelica (4.6), Kris Dunn (4.7), Brandon Rush (3.7)

Dead Money: 11.4 plus Nikola Pekovic (14.8) who is out for the season.

Minnesota Timberwolves Team Salary

New Orleans PelicansNew Orleans Pelicans

Salary Total: $99,718,087

Healthy Starters (54.5): Anthony Davis (22.2), Jrue Holiday (11.3), Omer Asik (9.9), E’Twaun Moore (8.1), Dante Cunningham (3.0)

Note: Holiday recently returned from personal time, the Pelicans’ starting lineup is in flux.

Highest Reserve: Solomon Hill (11.3)

Other Contributors: Tyreke Evans (10.2), once healthy, Langston Galloway (5.2), Alexis Ajinca (4.7), Tim Frazier (2.1), Terrence Jones (1.0), Buddy Hield (3.5), Archie Goodwin (0.9)

Dead Money: 2.4

New Orleans Pelicans Team Salary

New York KnicksNew York Knicks

Salary Total: $102,632,073

Healthy Starters (76.4): Carmelo Anthony (23.9), Derrick Rose (20.8), Joakim Noah (16.6), Courtney Lee (11.0), Kristaps Porzingis (4.2)

Highest Reserve: Lance Thomas (6.0)

Other Contributors: Brandon Jennings (4.9), Justin Holiday (1.0), Willy Hernangomez (1.0), Mindaugas Kuzminskas (2.8), Kyle O’Quinn (3.8), Maurice Ndour (0.5)

Dead Money: 1.2

New York Knicks Team Salary

Oklahoma City ThunderOklahoma City Thunder

Salary Total: $86,969,118

Healthy Starters (47.0): Russell Westbrook (30.5), Victor Oladipo (7.5), Steven Adams (3.6), Domantas Sabonis (2.8), Andre Roberson (2.5)

Highest Reserve: Enes Kanter (19.7)

Other Contributors: Jerami Grant (1.1), Alex Abrines (6.9), Joffrey Lauvergne (2.0), Semaj Christon (1.1), Kyle Singler (5.6), Cameron Payne (2.4, injured)

Dead Money: 5.0

Oklahoma City Thunder Team Salary

Orlando MagicOrlando Magic

Salary Total: $106,785,222

Healthy Starters (44.9): Evan Fournier (15.9), Serge Ibaka (11.5), Nikola Vucevic (11.0), Aaron Gordon (4.1), Elfrid Payton (2.4)

Highest Reserve: Bismack Biyombo (15.9)

Other Contributors: Jeff Green (14.0), DJ Augustin (6.8), C.J. Watson (4.7), Mario Hezonja (3.7)

Dead Money: None

Orlando Magic Team Salary

Philadelphia 76ersPhiladelphia 76ers

Salary Total: $77,495,724

Healthy Starters (40.3): Gerald Henderson (11.6), Ersan Ilyasova (10.8), Sergio Rodriguez (10.3), Joel Embiid (6.2), Robert Covington (1.3)

Highest Reserve: Jerryd Bayless (12.2)

Other Contributors: Jahlil Okafor (6.2), Nerlens Noel (5.7, injured), Nik Stauskas (3.9), Dario Saric (3.0), Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot (1.7), Richaun Holmes (1.3), Hollis Thompson (1.3), T.J. McConnell (1.1)

Dead Money: 15.7 plus Ben Simmons (7.6), who may be out for the season.

Philadelphia 76ers Team Salary

Phoenix SunsPhoenix Suns

Salary Total: $81,444,454

Healthy Starters (41.4): Eric Bledsoe (17.2), Tyson Chandler (15.2), Marquese Chriss (3.6), Devin Booker (2.7), T.J. Warren (2.6)

Note: The Suns’ starting lineup is in flux.

Highest Reserve: Brandon Knight (15.5)

Other Contributors: Jared Dudley (12.9), P.J. Tucker (6.5), Alex Len (5.9), Dragan Bender (5.3), Leandro Barbosa (4.9)

Dead Money: 3.5

Phoenix Suns Team Salary

Portland Trail BlazersPortland Trail Blazers

Salary Total: $112,823,450

Healthy Starters (41.3): Damian Lillard (21.6), Mo Harkless (8.0), Al-Farouq Aminu (6.8), C.J. McCollum (2.9), Mason Plumlee (2.1)

Highest Reserve: Allen Crabbe (16.4)

Other Contributors: Evan Turner (14.5), Meyers Leonard (8.2), Festus Ezeli (6.6, injured), Ed Davis (5.9), Noah Vonleh (2.4)

Dead Money: 1.8

Portland Trail Blazers Team Salary

Sacramento KingsSacramento Kings

Salary Total: $96,210,260

Healthy Starters (53.9): DeMarcus Cousins (17.6), Rudy Gay (13.9), Arron Afflalo (13.0), Kosta Koufos (8.4), Ty Lawson (1.0)

Note: The Kings’ starting lineup is in flux.

Highest Reserve: Anthony Tolliver (8.4)

Other Contributors: Garrett Temple (8.3), Matt Barnes (6.4), Darren Collison (5.4), Ben McLemore (4.2), Willie Cauley-Stein (3.7)

Dead Money: 0.8

Sacramento Kings Team Salary

San Antonio SpursSan Antonio Spurs

Salary Total: $108,309,287

Healthy Starters (72.2): LaMarcus Aldridge (19.0), Kawhi Leonard (16.3), Pau Gasol (14.3), Tony Parker (13.3), Danny Green (9.2)

Highest Reserve: Manu Ginobili (12.9)

Other Contributors: Patty Mills (3.3), Dewayne Dedmon (2.7), David Lee (1.4), Kyle Anderson (1.1), Jonathon Simmons (0.8), Nicolas Laprovittola (0.5), Davis Bertans (0.5)

Dead Money: 3.0

San Antonio Spurs Team Salary

Toronto RaptorsToronto Raptors

Salary Total: $106,727,970

Healthy Starters (64.0): DeMar DeRozan (24.9), Jonas Valanciunas (13.5), DeMarre Carroll (13.3), Kyle Lowry (11.2), Pascal Siakam (1.1)

Highest Reserve: Terrence Ross (9.4)

Other Contributors: Cory Joseph (6.9), Patrick Patterson (5.7), Jared Sullinger (5.3, injured), Lucas Nogueira (1.8), Norman Powell (0.8), Jakob Poeltl (2.5)

Dead Money: 0.2

Toronto Raptors Team Salary

Utah JazzUtah Jazz

Salary Total: $80,498,192

Healthy Starters (48.0): Gordon Hayward (20.0), Derrick Favors (13.7), George Hill (9.9), Rudy Gobert (2.6), Rodney Hood (1.7)

Highest Reserve: Joe Johnson (13.7)

Other Contributors: Boris Diaw (8.7), Dante Exum (4.9), Shelvin Mack (2.9), Trey Lyles (2.9), Joe Ingles (2.6)

Dead Money: 0.3 plus Alex Burks (12.6), who is injured.

Utah Jazz Team Salary

Washington WizardsWashington Wizards

Salary Total: 103,285,007

Healthy Starters (62.3): Bradley Beal (21.4), John Wall (16.4), Marcin Gortat (11.6), Markieff Morris (7.2), Otto Porter (6.3)

Highest Reserve: Ian Mahinmi (15.4)

Other Contributors: Andrew Nicholson (5.9), Jason Smith (4.8), Trey Burke (3.3), Tomas Satoransky (2.8), Kelly Oubre (1.9), Marcus Thornton (0.9)

Dead Money: 1.0

Washington Wizards Team Salary

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NBA

Rest Assured, the 1-16 NBA Playoff Format Is Coming… Kinda

Based on Adam Silver’s comments, it’s safe to assume that the NBA will soon reformat the playoffs.

Moke Hamilton

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If there’s one thing Adam Silver has proven in his four years as the NBA’s Commissioner, it’s that he isn’t afraid to do things his way.

And if Silver has his way, the league will eventually figure out how it can implement a system that results in a more balanced playoff system. On Saturday, though, he revealed that it’s probably closer to a reality than many of us realize.

During his annual All-Star media address, Silver admitted that the league will “continue to look at” how they can reformat the playoffs to both ensure a better competitive balance throughout and pave the way for the league’s two best teams to meet up in the NBA Finals, even if both of those two teams happen to be in the same conference.

“You also would like to have a format where your two best teams are ultimately going to meet in the Finals,” the commissioner said on Saturday night.

“You could have a situation where the top two teams in the league are meeting in the conference finals or somewhere else. So we’re going to continue to look at that. It’s still my hope that we’re going to figure out ways.”

Since Silver took over the league, he’s been consistent in implementing dramatic changes to improve the overall quality of the game. Although Silver didn’t take over as the league’s commissioner until 2014, he was instrumental in getting the interested parties to buy into the notion that the “center” designation on the All-Star ballot was obsolete.

As a result, beginning with the 2013 All-Star Game, the Eastern and Western Conference teams have featured three “frontcourt” players, which essentially lumps centers in with forwards and eliminates the requirement that a center appear in the All-Star game. That wasn’t always the case.

From overhauling the league’s scheduling to reducing back-to-back games to implementing draft lottery reform to, this year, eliminating the traditional All-Star format which featured the Eastern Conference versus the Western Conference, it’s become clear that Silver simply “gets it” and isn’t afraid to make revolutionary changes if he deems them to be in the overall best interest of the league.

At this point, everyone realizes that something needs to be done about the league’s current playoff system.

Last season, for example, the Western Conference first round playoff series featured the Houston Rockets and Oklahoma City Thunder squaring off against one another. Only one series—the Los Angeles Clippers versus Utah Jazz—went seven games.

Meanwhile, in the Eastern Conference, the first round series that were contested weren’t exactly compelling.

The Cleveland Cavaliers steamrolled the conference to the tune of a 12-1 run to their third consecutive trip to the NBA Finals. It wasn’t the first time that the public questioned the wisdom behind separating the playoff brackets by conference, but the dominance of the Cavs and LeBron James specifically (who is expected to win the Eastern Conference for the eighth consecutive time this season) has caused renewed scrutiny.

The most common solution offered to this point has been to simply take the 16 best teams across the league, irrespective of conference, and conduct the playoffs as normal.

From afar, this solution seems simple enough, but the obvious concerns are twofold.

First, if the Celtics and Clippers, for example, were pitted against one another in a first round series, the travel would be considerable. Private charter flight or not, traveling is taxing, and the prospect of having to make five cross-country trips over the course of a two-week span would certainly leave the winner of such a series at a competitive disadvantage against the opponents they would face in subsequent rounds, especially if the future opponent enjoyed a playoff series that was contested within close proximity.

Atlanta to New Orleans, for example, is less than a one-hour flight.

Aside from the concerns about geographic proximity, the other obvious issue is competitive balancing of the schedule, which seems to be an easier issue to fix.

Using the Pelicans as an example, of the 82 games they play, 30 are played against the other conference—in this case, the Eastern Conference. The other 52 games would all be played within the conference. If playoff seedings were going to be done on a simple 1-16 basis, the scheduling would have to be realigned in a way to essentially pit all teams against one another evenly. It wouldn’t be fair for a team like the Celtics to be judged on the same standard as the Pelicans if the Celtics faced inferior teams more often.

On Saturday night, Silver revealed that the league’s brass has been thinking about this and is trying to find a solution, and in doing so, he may have tipped his hand.

* * * * * *

As a multinational conglomerate, the NBA values the inclusion of as many markets as possible. Wanting to improve the overall quality of the product, though, there are interests that may not align fully.

What’s obvious with this year’s All-Star game is that the NBA has found a way to balance the two.

Rather than eliminating the conference designations altogether and simply choosing the “best” 24 players to be in the All-Star game, the league still chose All-Stars based on their conference, but then distributed them within the pool to allow for better competition.

That’s exactly what Silver revealed the NBA is considering doing with the playoffs. It makes perfect sense, and it’s probably just a matter of time before it’s implemented.

A report from ESPN notes that the idea that the league is kicking around would essentially do exactly what the league did with the All-Star selections with the playoff teams: choose the best from each conference, then disburse them in a way that allows for competitive balance. 

The proposal would have the league’s teams compete as they normally do and would still feature the top eight teams from each conference getting into the playoffs.

Once the teams are qualified, however, they would be re-seeded on a 1-16 basis and crossmatched, on that basis.

It’s not perfect, but compromises never are. The travel issues would still persist, but the league would accomplish two goals: the less dominant conference wouldn’t be underrepresented and discouraged from competing, but the two best teams would still be on opposite ends of the bracket.

An NBA playoffs that featured 11 or 12 teams from the Western Conference would be a ratings nightmare for the league. Eastern Conference cities are less likely to stay up past midnight during the week to watch playoff games, and less competitive markets would frown at the prospect of having to compete against the other conference for a playoff spot. For many small market teams, the millions of dollars generated from a single playoff game often has a significant impact on the team’s operations, so there would naturally be discord.

This system would at least eliminate that contention.

On the positive side, it would allow for the Rockets and Warriors, for example, to meet in the NBA Finals. In both the NFL and MLB, geography hasn’t been a determining factor on which teams battle for the league’s championship.

Why does it have to be in the NBA?

* * * * * *

With the league having begun regular season play earlier this season, at the All-Star break, most teams have played about 57 games. A lot can change over the final 25 games of the season, but if the seeds were frozen today and the league took the top eight teams from each conference and then crossmatched them, the Los Angeles Clippers would be the team that got the short end o the stick.

Although the Clippers have the 16th best record in the league, they would be the ninth-seeded Western Conference team and would thus be eliminated from postseason contention by the Miami HEAT. The HEAT have the 17th best record in the league but are the eighth-best team in the Eastern Conference, so to preserve the conference weight, the HEAT would win out.

This is what the seedings and matchups would look like…

(1) Houston Rockets versus (16) Miami HEAT

(2) Golden State Warriors versus (15) New Orleans Pelicans

(3) Toronto Raptors versus (14) Philadelphia 76ers

(4) Boston Celtics versus (13) Portland Trail Blazers

(5) Cleveland Cavaliers versus (12) Denver Nuggets

(6) San Antonio Spurs versus (11) Oklahoma City Thunder

(7) Minnesota Timberwolves versus (10) Milwaukee Bucks

(8) Washington Wizards versus (9) Indiana Pacers

Here, the Celtics would face the nightmarish scenario of having to travel to and from Portland for their playoff series, while virtually every other series would feature much more friendly travel (especially the Spurs-Thunder and Raptors-Sixers).

The Cavs would have a very tough road to the Finals, having to beat the Nuggets, Celtics and Rockets if the seeds held. The Celtics would have a similarly tough road, as they’d have to get past the Blazers, Cavs and Rockets.

At the end of the day, the Rockets and Warriors would be aligned in such a way as to avoid one another until the championship, but each of the two would face daunting competition. The Rockets would have to go through the HEAT, Wizards and Celtics, while the Warriors would have to face the Pelicans, Timberwolves and Raptors—again, assuming the seeds held.

It would be a benefit to all observers.

One of the unintended consequences of implementing this system would be to make every single game count. If the Celtics were able to move up to the second seed, for example, their road to the Finals, in theory, could become much much easier, comparatively speaking.

The end result would be less resting of players during the course of the season and certainly less instances in which star players take the final week of the regular season off in other to be fresh for the postseason.

Everyone wins.

No, there’s no perfect solution, but just as the league has found a clever way to serve multiple interests as it relates to the All-Star game’s competitiveness, Silver has revealed that the league is at least considering following suit with the playoffs.

Best bet?

It’s only a matter of time before we see it actually see it happen.

It simply makes too much sense, and if there’s one thing the commissioner has already proven, it’s that he isn’t afraid of changing tradition.

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All Star

NBA All-Star Saturday Recap

Brian Slingluff recaps All-Star Saturday from Los Angeles.

Basketball Insiders

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Basketball Insiders is here to recap an eventful All-Star Saturday that led to three first-time champs in the various skills contests. Let’s get right to it.

Taco Bell Skills Challenge

In Saturday night’s Taco Bell Skills Challenge, the “Bigs” team, boasting 3 All-Stars, set out to claim a third straight title. The competition kicked off with Joel Embiid coming from behind to best Al Horford, and sharpshooter Lauri Markkanen swishing his first 3 point attempt to eliminate Andre Drummond. On the Guard side, Buddy Hield had an early lead before losing out to Spencer Dinwiddie, and Jamal Murray upset hometown favorite Lou Williams.

In the semifinals, Markkanen was able to dispatch Joel Embiid, who struggled with the pass portion of the competition, and Dinwiddie topped Jamal Murray by making his first 3 pointer for the second consecutive round.

In the Final round, Dinwiddie finally missed a 3 pointer, but it did not matter as he finished with a wire to wire victory over Lauri Markkanen. Dinwiddie, competing in front of his friends and family, was able to end the Bigs’ two year win streak in impressive fashion.

JBL Three Point Contest

The event started off with Tobias Harris scoring a solid 18 points. Wayne Ellington was next, sporting the hot new alternate Miami Vice jersey. Ellington started off cold and heated up on his last three racks, ending up with a score of 17. Devin Booker and former three-point champion Klay Thompson tied for a round-high 19 points. Paul George, Bradley Beal, and Kyle Lowry struggled from the start and never found a rhythm, falling short of making the championship round. Defending champion Eric Gordon never got it going, and would not defend the title, scoring only 12 points.

In the Championship round, Tobias Harris was on fire through the first 3 racks, but quickly got cold, scoring 17 points. Devin Booker was next and could not miss, scoring 28 points, leaving Klay Thompson a high number to match. Thompson fell just 3 points short, and Devin Booker was crowned the 2018 JBL Three Point Champion.

Verizon Slam Dunk Contest

The final and most anticipated event of the night started with Donovan Mitchell bringing out a second hoop, bouncing it off the second backboard and finishing with an impressive windmill dunk, scoring a 48. Victor Oladipo followed with a difficult look-away alley oop dunk attempt that he was unable to complete, totaling 31 points from the judges. Dennis Smith Jr. had a nice reverse double pump that got 39 points and Larry Nance Jr., in a throwback Phoenix jersey, payed homage to his father’s cradle dunk, nailing it almost exactly for a score of 44 points.

Oladipo started the next round of dunks by borrowing Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther mask, and scoring 40 points with a tomahawk windmill dunk. Smith Jr. hit a seemingly impossible reverse 360, through the legs, switching hands dunk for a perfect score of 50. Nance Jr. pulled off a Vince Carter level windmill, nearly missing a perfect score. Mitchell jumped over comedian Kevin Hart to advance to the finals against Larry Nance Jr.

In the Finals, Nance started things off with a windmill alley-oop with some help from Larry Nance Sr., garnering a score of 46. Mitchell completed the difficult one handed alley-oop he had attempted in the previous round, scoring a perfect 50. Nance Jr. answered with an incredible double pass off the backboard dunk, scoring yet another 50 points.  Mitchell ended the contest with a Vince Carter tribute dunk, coming out on top by just two points. It capped off an exciting Saturday night, setting things up for the main event on Sunday, Team LeBron versus Team Stephen.

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NBA

David Nwaba and the Road Less Traveled

David Nwaba speaks to Basketball Insiders about his unconventional path to the NBA.

David Yapkowitz

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A player’s path to the NBA usually follows the same formula: A star in high school, a strong college career, and then eventually being selected in the NBA Draft. However, there are times when a player’s path is more unconventional. In the case of David Nwaba, he definitely took the path less traveled.

He attended University High School in West Los Angeles, where he was named All-Western League MVP twice as well as being an all-league selection. He finished his senior year in 2011 putting up 22.0 points per game and 11.5 rebounds per game.

He went to an NCAA Division 2 school, however, Hawaii Pacific University, but never suited up for them as he redshirted his freshman year. He played a year at Santa Monica Community College, where he was the Western State Conference South Division Player of the Year before transferring to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. According to Nwaba, the decision to leave Hawaii Pacific was made with the NBA in mind.

“It was always a dream of mine, it’s also why I left a Division 2 school that I started at,” Nwaba told Basketball Insiders. “I had bigger dreams of playing D1 and potentially the NBA. So that was a dream of mine. I never thought the journey would go like this but it is how it is.”

Behind Nwaba, Cal Poly made their first-ever NCAA appearance in 2014. They won the Big West Tournament as the seventh seed out of eight teams, and then knocked off Dayton for the right to come in as a No. 16 seed against No. 1 seed Wichita State. Cal Poly would go on to lose to Wichita State, but sparking that run to March Madness put Nwaba on the basketball map.

He didn’t get to the NBA right away, though. His first professional experience came with the then Los Angeles D-Fenders, now South Bay Lakers, the Los Angeles Lakers G-League affiliate. He initially began with the Reno Bighorns, the Sacramento Kings affiliate, but his rights were traded to Los Angeles. His strong play in the G-League was what caught the Lakers’ attention, enough to give him a pair of 10-day contracts, and then one for the rest of the season.

“It was a perfect spot to start up my professional career The G-League is a place to develop your game, and I think I developed a lot,” Nwaba told Basketball Insiders. “I learned a lot about the game, and I think it was a good place for me to start just out of college.”

Although he made a strong impression on the Lakers, Nwaba found out that nothing is ever guaranteed in the NBA. Due to a roster crunch when the team signed Kentavious Caldwell-Pope over the summer, the Lakers ended up cutting him. He didn’t stay unemployed for long though. Before he had a chance to hit the open market, the Chicago Bulls claimed him off waivers.

He’s since carved out a role as one of the Bulls most dependable players in the second unit. And just like his path to the league, his role is a bit of an unconventional one as a shooting guard. He’s shooting 51.7 percent from the field, but most of his shots come from in the paint. He only shoots 26.3 percent from three-point range. It’s been effective for him though.

“It’s just bringing energy off the bench and just being that defender,” Nwaba told Basketball Insiders. “For the most part, I just try to be aggressive going to the basket, finishing at the rim, making the right plays, just defending and playing hard.”

The Chicago Bulls got off to a slow start this season. They lost 17 of their first 20 games. In December, they started to pick up their play, winning 11 of their 20 games including a seven-game win streak. However, they’ve now dropped eight of their last 11 games. Despite that, Nwaba does see some encouraging signs. And in the Eastern Conference, he’s not quite ready to count out another run.

“We’re developing every game, just building chemistry amongst each other,” Nwaba told Basketball Insiders. “Who knows, all it takes is just a streak of eight to ten games or something and we’re already back in the playoff race. You never know, anything can turn around. It’s still a long season, a lot of games to be played, and a lot of time to develop our game. We’ve still got a lot of time with each other.”

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